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Sailplane Grand Prix in the Andes (2010)

The decision to film the FAI 3rd World Sailplane Grand Prix final in Chile was one happy consequence of the global economic downturn. The Vitacura club in Santiago had already demonstrated ... See full summary »

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The decision to film the FAI 3rd World Sailplane Grand Prix final in Chile was one happy consequence of the global economic downturn. The Vitacura club in Santiago had already demonstrated its organisational flair in 2009, and with other nations uncertain about whether or not they could host the 3rd Gliding World Grand Prix, it seemed logical to go with a venue that already had the infrastructure so freshly in place. And, with apologies to the world's other great mountain backdrops, what better place to showcase the pure natural beauty of gliding than the Andean Cordillera? The rest is history: a specialist film crew was assembled by Mario Hytten, and they recorded the glorious ups and downs of Sailplane Grand Prix that you see on the film. And if that's the history, just imagine the future. Written by Nick Parker

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21 August 2010 (Italy)  »

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€250,000 (estimated)
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Trivia

With the dawn of the HD TV era, spectacular images of this spectacular sport are the only way forward. Hence a team was dispatched to Chile to make a promotional film depicting the sheer exhilaration of SGP. The production was directed by Peter Newport, a New Zealander who previously produced "Gladiators of the Sky", without doubt the best film about gliding previously made. Also in the team was Peter Thompson, another Kiwi and a world specialist in aerial filming. He used a stabilized camera which is impervious to the movements and vibrations of the helicopter, thus allowing him to film a glider and a close-up of its cockpit from a distance of one kilometer. The resulting footage includes some of the most beautiful images of gliding ever committed to film. See more »

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