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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

14 items from 2016


Watch 'Documentary Now' Parody Talking Heads, Maysles in New Trailer

5 hours ago | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Fred Armisen and Bill Hader spoof the Talking Heads, D.A. Pennebaker, the Maysles Brothers and more in the new trailer for Season Two (or "Season 51") of Documentary Now!

The clip opens with host Helen Mirren reintroducing the "long-running" documentary showcase and offers a peak at Hader and Armisen's absurd parodies. Among the highlights are the duo's expertly retro takes on the Maysles' Salesman, in which Hader and Armisen play inept globe salesmen ("It says 'Bermuba' instead of 'Bermuda,'" a young boy points out).

The trailer finds Armisen and Hader »

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Film Review: ‘Kampai! For the Love of Sake’

19 August 2016 5:04 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

As a movie genre, food porn came of age in the 1980s, when art-house curios like “Babette’s Feast” and “Tampopo” left audiences salivating into their popcorn buckets. To this foodie, however, the taste-sensation aspect of those movies tended to be superior to the stories they told. If you asked me whether I’d prefer to watch a mouth-watering documentary about the succulence of Japanese noodle soup or a wild fairy tale about a samurai/cowboy searching for the ultimate noodle-soup recipe (“Tampopo” was that movie, and it had its fans, though I wasn’t among them), the answer is: The documentary, please!

A great many of us were made for the Food Channel era, in which the spectacle of chefs and recipes and kitchen-confidential trade secrets became a theater all its own. That, in fact, is why the food-porn genre ultimately evolved into documentary — impassioned portraits of culinary mania »

- Owen Gleiberman

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‘Chef’s Table’ Emmys 2016: How One Chef’s Ruined Palate Inspired Duncan Thum’s Luscious Score

19 August 2016 11:43 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

A chef’s worst nightmare came true, and not only did composer Duncan Thum set that to music, it earned him his second Emmy nomination, for Original Dramatic Score for Netflix’s “Chef’s Table.”

The story of Chef Grant Achatz, the Chicago wunderkind who is one of the leaders in progressive cuisine, is almost unbelievable in its irony: the chef lost his ability to taste food while undergoing treatment for cancer. That’s not the end of his narrative, but it is part of the reason why Thum settled on Achatz’s episode as the standout for Emmy submission, even though he had scored all six episodes of the series’ second season.

Read More: ‘Chef’s Table’: The Directors’ Secret Recipe for the Best Food Show on TV

“There’s something special about Grant’s story that I just personally related to, because my sister also struggled with cancer, »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Chef’s Table’ vs. ‘Top Chef’ for Emmys as Haute Cuisine Rides High on TV

10 August 2016 1:25 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The signature moment in each episode of Netflix’s Emmy-nominated “Chef’s Table” is no more than a succession of plates. Composer Duncan Thum’s melodramatic strings herald abstractions of texture and color, labeled as if on view at the Met: A rough pile of gray shards and purple flowers spattered with orange liquid (Grant Achatz’s “Graffiti, Carrot Spray Paint, Wild Mushrooms”); a wood husk filled with delicacies in the guise of dirt, twigs, and moss (Dominique Crenn’s “A Walk in the Forest”). Each montage is an expression of the belief that haute cuisine is high art, one shared by the series’ renowned subjects. “There [are] other disciplines that we can draw on for inspiration,” Achatz remarks. “There are no rules. Do whatever you want.”

For a series defined by cuisine that defies convention, however—gold-leafed ants and pillows of nutmeg air, flights of fancy and sleights of hand »

- Matt Brennan

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IFC’s ‘Documentary Now!’: Bill Hader and Fred Armisen Break Down the Docs Spoofed in Season 2

31 July 2016 1:26 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

IFC announced at its press day for the Television Critics Association on Sunday that its spoof series “Documentary Now!” will return for its second season September 14 at 10pm.

The second season continues the series’ winning formula of paying homage to well-known documentary films, but with a Fred Armisen and Bill Hader twist. Each episode, Dame Helen Mirren acts as host to introduce the faux docs.

The six lucky films that get the “Documentary Now!” treatment this season are as follows:

Inspiration: “The War Room

Spoof: “The Bunker” — A 1990s gubernatorial race shot by camcorder is as gloriously low-rent and ethically dubious as can be expected.

Hader plays a campaign manager named Teddy Redbones, who has echoes of Hader’s impersonation of James Carville. “Teddy Redbones is different. He just wants to win,” the actor told the TCA. “He’s this super insane campaign guy. He keeps forgetting [his client’s] name. It doesn »

- Hanh Nguyen

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IFC’s ‘Documentary Now!’: Bill Hader and Fred Armisen Break Down the Docs Spoofed in Season 2

31 July 2016 1:26 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

IFC announced at its press day for the Television Critics Association on Sunday that its spoof series “Documentary Now!” will return for its second season September 14 at 10pm.

The second season continues the series’ winning formula of paying homage to well-known documentary films, but with a Fred Armisen and Bill Hader twist. Each episode, Dame Helen Mirren acts as host to introduce the faux docs.

The six lucky films that get the “Documentary Now!” treatment this season are as follows:

Inspiration: “The War Room

Spoof: “The Bunker” — A 1990s gubernatorial race shot by camcorder is as gloriously low-rent and ethically dubious as can be expected.

Hader plays a campaign manager named Teddy Redbones, who has echoes of Hader’s impersonation of James Carville. “Teddy Redbones is different. He just wants to win,” the actor told the TCA. “He’s this super insane campaign guy. He keeps forgetting [his client’s] name. It doesn »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Documentary Now!’ Clip: Bill Hader and Fred Armisen Parody the Maysles Brothers’ ‘Salesman’ in First Look at Season 2

16 June 2016 4:45 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

 

After sending up the likes of “Grey Gardens” and “The Thin Blue Line” during its successful first season, “Documentary Now!” is set to return later this year. IFC has released the first clip from this next go-round, which features stars Bill Hader and Fred Armisen in a smoke-filled living room as they hawk their wares.

Read More: ‘Documentary Now!’ Stands Out in the Emmys’ Variety Sketch Race

The scene comes from “Globesmen,” a parody of Albert and David Maysles’ “Salesman” — a landmark of vérité nonfiction filmmaking, also known as direct cinema. The black-and-white aesthetic matches that of the 1968 film, which follows door-to-door Bible salesmen, as Hader tries to sell a globe to a family of four but has that attempt derailed by Armisen’s decision to lewdly draw attention to the family’s 13-year-old daughter.

Read More: IFC’s ‘Documentary Now’ Season 2 to Parody Albert Maysles and More

Also returning »

- Michael Nordine

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‘Documentary Now!’ Clip: Bill Hader and Fred Armisen Parody the Maysles Brothers’ ‘Salesman’ in First Look at Season 2

16 June 2016 4:45 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

 

After sending up the likes of “Grey Gardens” and “The Thin Blue Line” during its successful first season, “Documentary Now!” is set to return later this year. IFC has released the first clip from this next go-round, which features stars Bill Hader and Fred Armisen in a smoke-filled living room as they hawk their wares.

Read More: ‘Documentary Now!’ Stands Out in the Emmys’ Variety Sketch Race

The scene comes from “Globesmen,” a parody of Albert and David Maysles’ “Salesman” — a landmark of vérité nonfiction filmmaking, also known as direct cinema. The black-and-white aesthetic matches that of the 1968 film, which follows door-to-door Bible salesmen, as Hader tries to sell a globe to a family of four but has that attempt derailed by Armisen’s decision to lewdly draw attention to the family’s 13-year-old daughter.

Read More: IFC’s ‘Documentary Now’ Season 2 to Parody Albert Maysles and More

Also returning »

- Michael Nordine

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Dominique Crenn on ‘Chef’s Table’: ‘It’s Not About Me Cooking’

13 June 2016 8:45 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

In its second season, Netflix’s “Chef’s Table” visits Dominique Crenn. She’s the only female chef in the U.S. to garner two Michelin stars, for her innovative modernist San Francisco restaurant Atelier Crenn. Created by David Gelb, the director of “Jiro Dreams of Sushi,” the series goes far beyond a typical food show, blending exquisitely photographed dishes with deep conversations about the chefs’ lives and influences. Raised in Brittany, Crenn also presides over a second restaurant, Petit Crenn, and will be cooking at the Desert Trip music festival.

How was this experience different from other TV you had done such as “Iron Chef”?

I didn’t think it was about food, it was about something so much deeper. I spent a lot of time with the director and the team, it was just about getting to know each other. It’s important to bring some transparency of the person who you are. It’s not about me cooking, it’s about me being a human, getting into my emotions, my way of thinking.

What can viewers take away from the episode, even if they never get to your restaurants?

It’s a platform for me to express that you can do whatever you dream to do, you just have to go for it. It’s not about perfection, it’s about evolution. Maybe it can help young women — I hope it can inspire a lot of them.

Why do you provide diners with a poem as part of their meals?

I’m very strong but also very sensitive, very connected to everything that has to do with memory and emotion. It’s a window of who I am. I’ve never been trained as a chef, I was lucky enough to have incredible parents who gave me the chance to look at the world through art and literature and politics — it’s a continuation. We live in a poetic world.

Do chefs these days face too much pressure to become media personalities?

As a chef, you need to understand who you are — you have to use the branding or any other things as a tool to continue what you’re doing. But don’t get too much over your head, the core of who you are is to cook. I’m at Atelier Crenn basically every night, I connect with each of my guests, it’s super-important. It’s such a hard job to do — you have to really make sure you have your head on your shoulders so you don’t get burned.

You’re cooking at Desert Trip – Is it possible to experience good food at a music festival? 

Food and music and poetry — everything comes together. I’ll be having fun, not trying to be too serious. When you think about it it makes sense — food can be a type of song, you feel it in your heart and your tummy. You have to make sure that there is a lot of water. When I think about those kind of events, it’s about bringing different art forms together. Maybe I’ll do something crazy — maybe I’ll do a cocktail!

How are San Francisco and Los Angeles different as restaurant cities?

San Francisco was a special place to be. A lot of things started here: political movements, Alice Waters, spotlighting farmers, wineries. This is a progressive city, with a lot of diversity. San Francisco has people thinking outside of the box, it’s is always at the forefront of new stuff.

Los Angeles is getting a lot of incredible talent and restaurants, and it’s ready for it. L.A. has a different type of lifestyle. I would love to do something in L.A. that would feed what Los Angeles is about. I would love to do Petit Crenn if someone would let me. I love Los Angeles.

 

 

 

»

- Pat Saperstein

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Seth Meyers, Bill Hader, Fred Armisen Laugh Through ‘Documentary Now!’ Season One

15 May 2016 12:52 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

When Seth Meyers, Bill Hader and Fred Armisen were on a panel for their IFC series “Documentary Now!,” it felt like a mini-“Saturday Night Live” reunion as the three easily slipped into bits and had the audience — as well as each other — in stitches. Their discussion was held at the Writers Guild Theater in Beverly Hills on Friday.

On the red carpet before the panel, Meyers told Variety about “Sandy Passage,” an episode he wrote based on “Grey Gardens.” He revealed that it was one of the last ideas they came up with in season one.

“We just knew it would be such a good look and a good entry to the idea of what ‘Documentary Now!’ was,” Meyers said. “Here’s this iconic documentary, here it is with these guys and maybe a move you didn’t see coming. We felt like that was the poster people would look at and say, »

- Diane Gordon

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[Tribeca Review] Bugs

25 April 2016 8:21 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Somewhere between Jiro Dreams of Sushi and Food, Inc., at the intersection of culinary adventure and social justice, Nordic Food Lab’s head chef Ben Reade and lead researcher Josh Evans are on a mission to bring sustainable, delicious and culturally appropriate foods to the planet’s underserved. Examining ratios like the efficiency of protein production the duo’s journey takes them to all over the world from Kenya to Australia with a stop in Japan as they hunt for the most delicious and nutritious bugs and the best ways to prepare them.

Andreas Johnsen’s hugely entertaining Bugs documents this open-ended quest as the pair work in collaboration with the locals to prepare culturally appropriate meals including tacos, maggot cheese gelato, cricket and grasshopper ravioli as well as insect-based coatings and flowers. The team spends its time making its case to the lab’s advisory board that these foods »

- John Fink

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Tribeca ‘16: Art and culture collide with Branson, Pelè and Aoki in Special Screenings, Events and Wip

25 March 2016 12:51 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

The 15th edition of the Tribeca Film Festival will take place from April 13 to April 24 in New York City and will screen two films that are works in progress, and five special screenings and four special events that include live performances by artists including Steve Aoki and Billie Joe Armstrong and special appearances including Sir Richard Branson and Pelè.

Dan Aykroyd (The Heart of the

Ghostbusters) in his Sony Ghost Corps office with pictures of his grandfather and father in the background along and other parapsychologist. Photo credit: Derrick Kunzer (co-producer and cinematographer of

Ghostheads)

Writer/director Brendan Mertens’ work in progress documentary Ghostheads is a special sneak preview into the many faces of the Ghostbusters fandom and its 30-year celebration as one of cinema’s most iconic franchises.  The Wip features interviews with Dan Aykroyd, Ivan Reitman, Sigourney Weaver and Paul Feig.

From left to right: Bill Nye, Director Jason Sussberg, »

- Sacha Hall

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Tribeca Film Festival to Open With Met Museum Documentary ‘The First Monday in May’

22 February 2016 9:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The 2016 Tribeca Film Festival will open with the world premiere screening of “The First Monday in May,” Andrew Rossi’s documentary about the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s attention-grabbing Costume Institute exhibition, “China: Through the Looking Glass.”

Magnolia Pictures’ “First Monday,” which will be the opening-night film of the Tribeca festival’s 15th edition, comes from the director of an earlier documentary about another New York institution, “Page One: Inside the New York Times.” “First Monday” centers on Met curator Andrew Bolton and the creation of the 2015 exhibit about Chinese-inspired Western fashion, as well as on the 2015 Met Gala, co-chaired by Anna Wintour.

“The First Monday in May” will kick off this year’s Tribeca Film Festival April 13. Produced by Fabiola Beracasa Beckman, Sylvana Ward Durrett, and Dawn Ostroff, in association with Relativity Studios, Conde Nast Entertainment, Mediaweaver Entertainment and Sarah Arison Productions, the movie will be released by Magnolia »

- Gordon Cox

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Netflix Sets February 19 Premiere Date For Documentary Series ‘Cooked’

15 January 2016 3:03 PM, PST | Tubefilter.com | See recent Tubefilter News news »

Netflix has another original series on the way sure to make subscribers’ mouths water. The streaming video provider will release the four-part documentary series Cooked on February 19, 2016,

Cooked takes a look at how the four physical elements used in the history of cooking -- earth, fire, water, and air -- have helped humans fulfill their base desire to cook. For example, the food-centric series will show how Aboriginal natives in Western Australia fire-roast monitor lizards, as well as a Benedictine nun and microbiologist from Connecticut who makes traditional French cheese. Cooked’s main message is to encourage viewers to take control of their own health by rediscovering the joys of cooking at home.

The upcoming Netflix docu-series hails from The Botany of Desire and In Defense of Food author Michael Pollan and Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief filmmaker Alex Gibney (both pictured above). Gibney’s Jigsaw Productions produced Cooked alongside Netflix. »

- Bree Brouwer

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

14 items from 2016


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