IMDb > Jiro Dreams of Sushi (2011)
Jiro Dreams of Sushi
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Jiro Dreams of Sushi (2011) More at IMDbPro »

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Jiro Dreams of Sushi -- A thoughtful and elegant meditation on work, family and the art of perfection, chronicling Jiro Ono's life as both an unparalleled success in the culinary world and a loving yet complicated father.
Jiro Dreams of Sushi -- A documentary on 85-year-old sushi master Jiro Ono, his business in the basement of a Tokyo office building, and his relationship with his son and eventual heir, Sukiyabashi.

Overview

User Rating:
7.9/10   23,462 votes »
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Popularity: ?
Up 6% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
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View company contact information for Jiro Dreams of Sushi on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
15 March 2012 (Denmark) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
A documentary on 85-year-old sushi master Jiro Ono, his renowned Tokyo restaurant, and his relationship with his son and eventual heir, Yoshikazu. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
2 wins & 11 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(226 articles)
Netflix Sets February 19 Premiere Date For Documentary Series ‘Cooked’
 (From Tubefilter News. 15 January 2016, 3:03 PM, PST)

Top 50 modern movie documentaries
 (From Den of Geek. 12 November 2015, 3:15 AM, PST)

[Review] Burnt
 (From The Film Stage. 21 October 2015, 12:16 PM, PDT)

User Reviews:
Both fascinating and inspirational, this portrait of a man in pursuit of perfection is a humbling and life-changing experience See more (53 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)
Masuhiro Yamamoto ... Himself
Daisuke Nakazama ... Himself
Hachiro Mizutani ... Himself
Harutaki Takahashi ... Himself
Hiroki Fujita ... Himself
Tsunenori Ida ... Himself
Toichiro Iida ... Himself
Akihiro Oyama ... Himself
Shizuo Oyama ... Himself
Hiroshi Okuda ... Himself
Yukio Watanabe ... Himself
Kazunori Kumakawa ... Himself
Kazuo Fukaya ... Himself
Syozo Someya ... Himself
Hiromichi Honda ... Himself
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Jiro Ono ... Himself
Yoshikazu Ono ... Himself

Directed by
David Gelb 
 
Produced by
Jacob Aronson .... consulting producer
Joey Carey .... executive producer
Ross M. Dinerstein .... executive producer
Kevin Iwashina .... producer
Chris Kelly .... executive producer
Jeffrey C. Norman .... executive producer
Stefan Nowicki .... executive producer
Ed Ojdana .... executive producer
Tom Pellegrini .... producer
Scott Prisand .... co-executive producer
Jeremy Umland .... co-executive producer
Matt Weaver .... executive producer
 
Cinematography by
David Gelb 
 
Film Editing by
Brandon Driscoll-Luttringer 
 
Production Management
Gina Amador .... post-production supervisor
 
Sound Department
Darlene Gorzela .... additional sound
Laura Harley .... post-production sound coordinator
Tim Hoogenakker .... dialogue editor
Tim Hoogenakker .... sound re-recording mixer
Chris Johnston .... foley mixer
Dawn Redmann .... post-production sound coordinator
Anthony Vanchure .... foley artist
Anthony Vanchure .... sound editor
Darren 'Sunny' Warkentin .... supervising sound editor
Robert Weiss .... sound editor
 
Visual Effects by
Peter Sauvey .... visual effects (as Peter Sauvy)
 
Editorial Department
Evans Butterworth .... digital intermediate account executive
Brandon Driscoll-Luttringer .... color correction
David B. Guthrie .... assistant editor (as David Guthrie)
Steve Hernandez .... digital intermediate producer
Eliot Milbourn .... digital intermediate colorist
Mathieu Reid .... color timer
 
Music Department
Jeff Foxworth .... composer: additional music
The Ontic .... composer: additional music
Rye Randa .... composer: additional music
David Rich .... music clearances
Janet Billig Rich .... music clearances
 
Other crew
Christopher Berdine .... title designer
Cole Dabney .... social media & marketing
Elsa Ramo .... financial legal services
 
Thanks
Lon Bender .... special thanks
Steve Drypolcher .... special thanks
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
MPAA:
Rated PG for mild thematic elements and brief smoking
Runtime:
81 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.78 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Professional sushi knives are sharpened asymmetrically, with the larger angle on the right side of the edge for right-handed chefs or the left side for left-handed chefs. The nearly unsharpened left side can be seen in the montage of closeups after the staff breakfast scene.See more »
Quotes:
Jiro Ono:I've never once hated this job. I fell in love with my work and gave my life to it. Even though I'm eighty five years old, I don't feel like retiring. That's how I feel.See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Off To MarketSee more »

FAQ

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31 out of 33 people found the following review useful.
Both fascinating and inspirational, this portrait of a man in pursuit of perfection is a humbling and life-changing experience, 25 July 2012
Author: moviexclusive from Singapore

It is a sad but true fact that modern-day society has tended to place too much emphasis on the pursuit of success defined in tangible and even grandiose forms but not so much on the far more meaningful pursuit of perfection. No wonder then that 'Jiro Dreams of Sushi', a thoughtful and absolutely inspiring portrait of the 85-year-old sushi chef Jiro Ono, comes like a breath of fresh air, demonstrating the superior fulfilment one gets by putting perfection ahead of success- since it is with the former that the latter will inevitably follow.

As is with most of our readers, we had not heard of Jiro Ono before this documentary, but here's just a few facts about him to tantalise you. Jiro is the owner of a 10-seater basement-level restaurant Sukiyabashi Jiro accessible via underpass en route to the Ginza subway station. Yet despite the fact that the restaurant has a fixed-menu, serves only sushi, and will set you back a whopping ¥30,000 (or $$480), you have to make reservations at least one month in advance in order to secure a seat.

And here's the most amazing thing- that humble restaurant has been awarded three Michelin stars, with both celebrity chefs Anthony Bourdain and Joel Robuchon proclaiming that their best sushi experience was at that very establishment. It's a fascinating subject for a documentary, and debut feature helmer David Gelb more than does his subject justice with a thoroughly intriguing look at Jiro's recipe for perfection as well as the dynamic between Jiro and his eldest son cum future heir to the business Yoshikazu.

It's no secret to reveal that dedication, hard work and perseverance are the ingredients to Jiro's success today- and Gelb demonstrates this through interviews with a prominent Japanese food critic Yamamoto Masuhiro, current and former apprentices, and of course Jiro himself. Each of these are informative and insightful, yielding different perspectives on the master – or as the Japanese would call him, 'shokunin', which means artisan – and among the ones you won't forget are his exacting ten-year training regime for staff and his constant and consistent pursuit for betterment.

Yet any portrayal of Jiro cannot be complete without his two sons - the elder Yoshikazu mentioned earlier and his younger son Takashi, who runs the restaurant's only other branch in the upscale Roppongi Hills neighbourhood in Tokyo. Instead of a college education, both sons were trained by their father from young as sushi chefs, and as Jiro himself admits, their tutelage could not have been any much easier than the other kitchen workers who spend hours fanning sheets of nori seaweed over a coal fire or practise making sweet omelette 200 times.

Throughout the movie, Gelb deliberately teases the question of whether the younger Ono, Yoshikazu, is indeed worthy enough to take over the reins from Jiro. It's not easy trying to live up to the expectations of a perfectionist father ("Jiro's ghost will always be there watching," he says with resignation at one point) but the answer as to whether Yoshikazu is good enough, is absolutely gratifying when it comes. Compared to Yoshikazu, less emphasis is paid on Takashi, except to imply that Takashi's methods will never be the same as that of Jiro's.

Interesting to note too that Jiro isn't the only one so passionate about his work- in fact, as Yoshikazu brings us on a tour of the teeming Tsujiki market where the restaurant, like most if not all other sushi joints in Tokyo, gets its catch, it becomes clear that Jiro has been able to keep up such high standards in his food precisely because his suppliers share the same demanding standards over the catch they sell. It's almost a code of practice between the two parties, and even Jiro's rice supplier refuses to sell the same rice he does to Jiro to the folks at the Grand Hyatt because he thinks he might as well not let them have it if they don't know how to cook it.

The attitude displayed by these individuals, including of course Jiro, is truly admirable – and like the people in the film, Gelb's documentary while multi-faceted in its subjects, remains as its titular character singular of purpose in reminding its audiences the reason for Jiro's extraordinary success thus far. Of course, there are the requisite mouth-watering shots of freshly made sushi to tantalise your tastebuds, but what ultimately rings loud and true is the very qualities that has gotten Jiro recognised by the Japanese government as a 'national treasure'.

And as far-fetched as the title may sound, it is actually meant to be taken literally – "in dreams I have grand visions of sushi," says Jiro, the pursuit of which forms the very essence of his being. We dare go as far as to say that watching 'Jiro Dreams of Sushi' is a life-changing experience, one that forces you to reflect and re-evaluate your priorities, to place perfection over success, and to recognise that the pursuit of one's dreams can truly be fulfilling.

- www.moviexclusive.com

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What other food documentaries would you reccomend? smezzy
so I guess it's not true about smoking and sushi chefs desksinagym
Do you like your job? cooldas
Best sushi restaurant by western standards.... jerry4444
Does anyone know when they discuss this during the film lawlor15
How did they know desksinagym
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