WAYS TO
WATCH:

See all
A documentary on 85-year-old sushi master Jiro Ono, his renowned Tokyo restaurant, and his relationship with his son and eventual heir, Yoshikazu.

Director:

2 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Chef's Table (TV Series 2015)
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.7/10 X  

Chef's Table goes inside the lives and kitchens of six of the world's most renowned international chefs. Each episode focuses on a single chef and their unique look at their lives, talents and passion from their piece of culinary heaven.

Stars: Dan Barber, Massimo Bottura, Bill Buford
Somm (2012)
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Four sommeliers attempt to pass the prestigious Master Sommelier exam, a test with one of the lowest pass rates in the world.

Director: Jason Wise
Stars: Bo Barrett, Shayn Bjornholm, Dave Cauble
Super Size Me (2004)
Documentary | Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

While examining the influence of the fast food industry, Morgan Spurlock personally explores the consequences on his health of a diet of solely McDonald's food for one month.

Director: Morgan Spurlock
Stars: Morgan Spurlock, Daryl Isaacs, Chemeeka Walker
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

A documentary about three unique restaurants and their respective owners.

Director: Joseph Levy
Stars: Grant Achatz, Cindy Breitbach, Mike Breitbach
Documentary | Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

The story of how an eccentric French shop-keeper and amateur film-maker attempted to locate and befriend Banksy, only to have the artist turn the camera back on its owner. The film contains... See full summary »

Director: Banksy
Stars: Banksy, Space Invader, Mr. Brainwash
Blackfish (2013)
Documentary | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

A documentary following the controversial captivity of killer whales, and its dangers for both humans and whales.

Director: Gabriela Cowperthwaite
Stars: Tilikum, Dave Duffus, Samantha Berg
Grizzly Man (2005)
Documentary | Biography
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

A devastating and heartrending take on grizzly bear activists Timothy Treadwell and Amie Huguenard, who were killed in October of 2003 while living among grizzlies in Alaska.

Director: Werner Herzog
Stars: Timothy Treadwell, Amie Huguenard, Werner Herzog
Documentary | Biography
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Paul Liebrandt is one of the most talented and controversial chefs in the food world and the youngest chef to have received 3 stars from the New York Times. He was 24. NY Times food critic,... See full summary »

Director: Sally Rowe
Stars: Heston Blumenthal, Daniel Boulud, Frank Bruni
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

An in-depth look at the inner-workings of the Church of Scientology.

Director: Alex Gibney
Stars: Paul Haggis, Jason Beghe, Spanky Taylor
Documentary | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

Filmmaker Michael Moore explores the roots of America's predilection for gun violence.

Director: Michael Moore
Stars: Michael Moore, Charlton Heston, Marilyn Manson
Food, Inc. (2008)
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

An unflattering look inside America's corporate controlled food industry.

Director: Robert Kenner
Stars: Michael Pollan, Eric Schlosser, Richard Lobb
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

For six months of the year, renowned Spanish chef Ferran Adrià closes his restaurant El Bulli and works with his culinary team to prepare the menu for the next season. An elegant, detailed ... See full summary »

Director: Gereon Wetzel
Stars: Ferran Adrià, Oriol Castro, Eduard Xatruch
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Masuhiro Yamamoto ...
Himself
Daisuke Nakazama ...
Himself
Hachiro Mizutani ...
Himself
Harutaki Takahashi ...
Himself
Hiroki Fujita ...
Himself
Tsunenori Ida ...
Himself
Toichiro Iida ...
Himself
Akihiro Oyama ...
Himself
Shizuo Oyama ...
Himself
Hiroshi Okuda ...
Himself
Yukio Watanabe ...
Himself
Kazunori Kumakawa ...
Himself
Kazuo Fukaya ...
Himself
Syozo Someya ...
Himself
Hiromichi Honda ...
Himself
Edit

Storyline

In the basement of a Tokyo office building, 85 year old sushi master Jiro Ono works tirelessly in his world renowned restaurant, Sukiyabashi Jiro. As his son Yoshikazu faces the pressures of stepping into his father's shoes and taking over the legendary restaurant, Jiro relentlessly pursues his lifelong quest to create the perfect piece of sushi. Written by anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

sushi | master | food | tuna | fish market | See All (22) »

Genres:

Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for mild thematic elements and brief smoking | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

| |  »

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

15 March 2012 (Denmark)  »

Also Known As:

Jiro e l'arte del sushi  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$42,035 (USA) (9 March 2012)

Gross:

$2,550,508 (USA) (17 August 2012)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Yoshikazu's car is an Audi RS 6 quattro, with all wheel drive and a 5.0 liter V10 twin-turbo engine capable of producing 426 kilowatts (579 PS or 571 bhp). See more »

Quotes

Masuhiro Yamamoto: [describing Jiro's dedication and consistency through the years] The difference between Jiro today and Jiro 40 years ago is only that he stopped smoking. Other than that, nothing has changed.
See more »

Crazy Credits

In the Special Thanks section, "The Tsukiji Fish Market" is listed twice. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Orange Is the New Black: WAC Pack (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

Off To Market
Composed and Produced by Rye Randa and Jeff Foxworth aka The Ontic
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Both fascinating and inspirational, this portrait of a man in pursuit of perfection is a humbling and life-changing experience
25 July 2012 | by (Singapore) – See all my reviews

It is a sad but true fact that modern-day society has tended to place too much emphasis on the pursuit of success defined in tangible and even grandiose forms but not so much on the far more meaningful pursuit of perfection. No wonder then that 'Jiro Dreams of Sushi', a thoughtful and absolutely inspiring portrait of the 85-year-old sushi chef Jiro Ono, comes like a breath of fresh air, demonstrating the superior fulfilment one gets by putting perfection ahead of success- since it is with the former that the latter will inevitably follow.

As is with most of our readers, we had not heard of Jiro Ono before this documentary, but here's just a few facts about him to tantalise you. Jiro is the owner of a 10-seater basement-level restaurant Sukiyabashi Jiro accessible via underpass en route to the Ginza subway station. Yet despite the fact that the restaurant has a fixed-menu, serves only sushi, and will set you back a whopping ¥30,000 (or $$480), you have to make reservations at least one month in advance in order to secure a seat.

And here's the most amazing thing- that humble restaurant has been awarded three Michelin stars, with both celebrity chefs Anthony Bourdain and Joel Robuchon proclaiming that their best sushi experience was at that very establishment. It's a fascinating subject for a documentary, and debut feature helmer David Gelb more than does his subject justice with a thoroughly intriguing look at Jiro's recipe for perfection as well as the dynamic between Jiro and his eldest son cum future heir to the business Yoshikazu.

It's no secret to reveal that dedication, hard work and perseverance are the ingredients to Jiro's success today- and Gelb demonstrates this through interviews with a prominent Japanese food critic Yamamoto Masuhiro, current and former apprentices, and of course Jiro himself. Each of these are informative and insightful, yielding different perspectives on the master – or as the Japanese would call him, 'shokunin', which means artisan – and among the ones you won't forget are his exacting ten-year training regime for staff and his constant and consistent pursuit for betterment.

Yet any portrayal of Jiro cannot be complete without his two sons - the elder Yoshikazu mentioned earlier and his younger son Takashi, who runs the restaurant's only other branch in the upscale Roppongi Hills neighbourhood in Tokyo. Instead of a college education, both sons were trained by their father from young as sushi chefs, and as Jiro himself admits, their tutelage could not have been any much easier than the other kitchen workers who spend hours fanning sheets of nori seaweed over a coal fire or practise making sweet omelette 200 times.

Throughout the movie, Gelb deliberately teases the question of whether the younger Ono, Yoshikazu, is indeed worthy enough to take over the reins from Jiro. It's not easy trying to live up to the expectations of a perfectionist father ("Jiro's ghost will always be there watching," he says with resignation at one point) but the answer as to whether Yoshikazu is good enough, is absolutely gratifying when it comes. Compared to Yoshikazu, less emphasis is paid on Takashi, except to imply that Takashi's methods will never be the same as that of Jiro's.

Interesting to note too that Jiro isn't the only one so passionate about his work- in fact, as Yoshikazu brings us on a tour of the teeming Tsujiki market where the restaurant, like most if not all other sushi joints in Tokyo, gets its catch, it becomes clear that Jiro has been able to keep up such high standards in his food precisely because his suppliers share the same demanding standards over the catch they sell. It's almost a code of practice between the two parties, and even Jiro's rice supplier refuses to sell the same rice he does to Jiro to the folks at the Grand Hyatt because he thinks he might as well not let them have it if they don't know how to cook it.

The attitude displayed by these individuals, including of course Jiro, is truly admirable – and like the people in the film, Gelb's documentary while multi-faceted in its subjects, remains as its titular character singular of purpose in reminding its audiences the reason for Jiro's extraordinary success thus far. Of course, there are the requisite mouth-watering shots of freshly made sushi to tantalise your tastebuds, but what ultimately rings loud and true is the very qualities that has gotten Jiro recognised by the Japanese government as a 'national treasure'.

And as far-fetched as the title may sound, it is actually meant to be taken literally – "in dreams I have grand visions of sushi," says Jiro, the pursuit of which forms the very essence of his being. We dare go as far as to say that watching 'Jiro Dreams of Sushi' is a life-changing experience, one that forces you to reflect and re-evaluate your priorities, to place perfection over success, and to recognise that the pursuit of one's dreams can truly be fulfilling.

  • www.moviexclusive.com



31 of 33 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
What other food documentaries would you reccomend? smezzy
so I guess it's not true about smoking and sushi chefs desksinagym
Mizutani also has 3 stars from Michelin Chris_S25
Takashi not in credits? ggrosz
How did they know desksinagym
Do you like your job? cooldas
Discuss Jiro Dreams of Sushi (2011) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page