Inez, Major Kingston's daughter, while riding to the ranch house, meets Mexican Bill as he is just chasing an Indian off the land. The poor fellow was at the river drinking water when ... See full summary »
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Storyline

Inez, Major Kingston's daughter, while riding to the ranch house, meets Mexican Bill as he is just chasing an Indian off the land. The poor fellow was at the river drinking water when Mexican Bill kicked him into the stream. Enraged, Inez takes her riding crop and beats Bill unmercifully. He turns towards her, but is soon given a dose of his own medicine by Yorel, Inez's lover. Mexican Bill swears revenge. He speedily rides to Major Kingston's house and tells him of the cowboy's love affair with Inez. When Yorel appears with Inez, Major Kingston shows him the door, with instructions never to approach his girl again. Yorel puts his horse away and then returns to the old man to tell him of his love for Inez. At this moment Mexican Bill raises the window and fires a shot at the old man, who drops to the floor. Mexican Bill rides to the ranch house and gives the alarm, saying that Yorel killed Major Kingston. The Indian, who was a witness of the incident, tries to tell the truth, but is ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Western

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

22 July 1909 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Released as a split reel along with Hiring a Girl (1909). See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Impossible not to have an interesting film
2 December 2014 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A Lubin Wild West picture, which has abuse of an Indian, the love of a girl and a cowboy, the ordering of the cowboy away, the attempted killing of the father of the girl by Mexican Bill, who had been handsomely chastised by the girl's cowboy lover, and finally a straightening out of the mix up which ends in Mexican Bill being presented with a necktie that is permanent, the exoneration of the cowboy lover and the marriage of the major's daughter to the cowboy. With these elements it would be impossible not to have an interesting film, and that is exactly what has been produced. The wild rush of the West is in it and there are plenty of dramatic situations which call for considerable self control to keep one's nerves steady. And there is applause when the affair is finished and everybody gets his deserts. - The Moving Picture World, July 31, 1909


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page