6.2/10
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251 user 288 critic

This Is 40 (2012)

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2:31 | Trailer

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Pete and Debbie are both about to turn 40, their kids hate each other, both of their businesses are failing, they're on the verge of losing their house, and their relationship is threatening to fall apart.

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1,572 ( 558)
2 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Graham Parker
Tom Freund ...
Graham Parker Solo Band
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Older Pregnant Parent
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School Playdate Parent
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School Playmate Child

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Storyline

Pete (Paul Rudd) and Debbie (Leslie Mann) are turning 40. But instead of celebrating, they're mired in a mid-life crisis with unruly kids, debt and unhappiness mounding. Pete's record label is failing and Debbie is unable to come to terms with her aging body. As Pete's 40th birthday party arrives, Pete and Debbie are going to have to rely on family, friends, employees, fitness trainers, aging rockers and ultimately each other to come to terms with life at age 40. Written by napierslogs

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Sort-of Sequel to 'Knocked Up'

Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sexual content, crude humor, pervasive language and some drug material | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

21 December 2012 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

This Is Forty  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$35,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$11,579,175 (USA) (21 December 2012)

Gross:

$67,523,385 (USA) (22 February 2013)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The song Charlotte plays on the keyboard near the beginning of the movie is the theme song to The Office (US) (2005) See more »

Goofs

Pete's mother could have very likely considered an abortion in 1972. Roe v Wade passed in 1973, but that is when abortion became legal. They were already being performed illegally before that. See more »

Quotes

Sadie: I don't make fun of your stupid Mad Men!
Pete: First of all, I don't get worked up over Mad Men.
Sadie: That's because Mad Men sucks!
Pete: What Don Draper has gone through beats whatever Jack is running from on some fucking island.
Sadie: A bunch of people smoking in an office, it's stupid!
See more »

Crazy Credits

After the main credits roll, there's an extended alternate take of Catherine ad-libbing insults during the conversation with the Julie, Pete, and Debbie. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Tonight Show with Jay Leno: Episode #21.52 (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

What Do I Know
Written by Elle King (as Tanner Schneider)
Performed by Elle King
Produced by Lyle Workman and Jonathan Karp
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
No plot--but very funny consistently: "humor porn"
23 December 2012 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

First off--this is well worth seeing, it is consistently funny--and at times keel-over funny. However if you're looking for a meaningful plot that gets neatly wrapped up, that's not gonna happen. Like porn, the plot was just there as an excuse for the many 'money shots'--the consistently funny gags about typical 40ish couple's lives.

Rudd's character is suffering a struggling business (and also maybe a little of 'struggling business'--if you know what I mean). Mann's character has a business also, that is suffering. Their kids are dealing with various modern-kid issues--Facebook bullies, trying to devour entire seasons of "Lost" in a matter of days, etc. The parents fight, the kids fight, Rudd & Mann each have issues with their own parents--one with abandonment issues, the other with what might be the polar opposite of abandonment.

And the gags and issues that arise, I can tell you, are all based in reality--it's a good composite of the issues that this demographic actually faces--only depicted with the cinematic equivalent of the "Photoshop saturation slider" cranked to 11.

A special mention for Leslie Mann and Judd Apatow's kids--they actually can act, and they were excellent in this film. They belonged in the film--not 'becuase their daddy is the producer'--but because they added big-time in both the many comedy scenes they were in, but also in the movie's scattered drama moments. Very adorable kids, who blended into this movie effortlessly and definitely added to its charm.

So that's the plot, and in the end, it leaves you with hope that things will get better, but never really pounds that point down and gift-wraps a sappy, happy ending, but it doesn't need to--the plot is just a vehicle to tow all of the gags with.

And the gags, mini-skits, etc, are very funny, and very consistent--me, my wife, and most of the theater were laughing through the bulk of the film (Stay for the ending credits--the blooper reel with Melissa McCarthy may be one of the funniest of the entire movie).

So that's it--I give it a 8--well worth seeing in the theater, and when it comes out on DVD, I'll definitely rent it and see it again.


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