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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

1-20 of 29 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Consider With Reservations: The Stars of Quantity Over Quality Cinema

20 April 2017 12:51 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

The stars of yesterday now are making three films a year you never knew existed until they show up on Netflix.^ Real Movie ^

In my prior life as a script reader, I certainly read a lot of bad scripts, but at times, an even more common occurrence was a script that seemed to do a great many things right, but somehow fell just short of being something you wanted to champion as a movie. As draining as the terrible scripts were, there’s something pure about clear-cut bad. It takes little effort to explain why they’re unfit.

The real challenges were the scripts that had kind of a decent premise, kind of an okay twist or two, and a lead character who wasn’t bad so much as he or she was just… there. The raw materials are there for what Could be a script. They just happen to be assembled in the least compelling way »

- The Bitter Script Reader

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Wes Anderson’s Manly Men

20 April 2017 10:51 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

In search of male desire in a twee world.

Here’s a thesis: with the singular exception of his animated adventure story, Fantastic Mr. Fox, the movies of Wes Anderson are fundamentally about nice, fiery desire. But while a number of his movies explore this through the conventional terrain of the heterosexual relationship and its discontents — The Royal Tenenbaums and Moonrise Kingdom come to mind — others explore more curious expressions of desire, leaving Anderson’s plain and plaintive ladies behind. Shared aesthetic characteristics, from the constantly reprised Cornell boxes to the carefully referenced dead Eastern European novelists, are subject of much ruthless discussion among Anderson acolytes. And, considering Anderson’s diligent cooperation with turning a collection of essays and interviews into a $35 coffee table book, that seems to be the dissection that Anderson embraces. But what are those other, male-centric movies actually about? Most critics, when forced to give something like a serious and meaningful answer, will »

- Andrew Karpan

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The top 25 films (that people have seen more than 5 times)

19 April 2017 1:33 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Simon Brew Apr 20, 2017

What tend to be the highest rated movies, where the criteria is said films have been watched at least five times?

One aside in a recent piece I penned at this site questioned whether films such as The Shawshank Redemption – for some time ranked as the best film of all time by popular vote at the IMDb – were favoured amongst those who’d seen it more than one time. I was questioning whether the films we tend to salute as the greatest – rather than our favourites – are the ones we tend to watch time and time again.

In the same article, for instance, I highlighted Schindler’s List, an excellent film, but not one I see too many people watching on six monthly rotation. That doesn’t make it a lesser film, rather, it’s the kind of movie that I’d imagine most have seen once or twice at best, »

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17 Shocks and Surprises from the 2017 Cannes Lineup, From ‘Twin Peaks’ to Netflix and Vr

13 April 2017 5:04 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

For such a highly anticipated event, the Cannes Film Festival tends to contain a fairly predictable lineup: The Official Selection focuses on established auteurs whose work lands a coveted slot at the flashy gathering on autopilot. That was certainly the case last year, when the 2016 edition opened with a Woody Allen movie and featured new work from the likes of Pedro Almodovar, Nicolas Winding Refn, the Dardennes brothers and Olivier Assayas.

But we live in unpredictable times, and judging by today’s announcement of the Official Selection for Cannes 2017, even the world’s most powerful festival isn’t impervious to change. This year’s Cannes is filled with surprises: television and virtual reality, some intriguing non-fiction selections, and a whole lot of unknown quantities that push the festival in fresh directions.

That’s not to say that there aren’t a few familiar names that stand out. Todd Haynes is »

- Eric Kohn

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Watch: 'In Praise of 16mm' Video Essay Discusses the Grainy Format

12 April 2017 4:21 PM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

Time for some film education and film appreciation in the form of a video essay from "The Royal Ocean Film Society". The video essay is titled "In Praise of 16mm" and it is exactly that - filmmaker/cinephile Andrew Saladino examines the use of 16mm film (as opposed to the standard 35mm or larger 65mm) for making movies. For those wondering how often 16mm gets used, some filmmakers do still use it every so often. Here are some recent films that were shot on 16mm: Carol, Beasts of the Southern Wild, Fruitvale Station, The Squid and the Whale, The Hurt Locker, Moonrise Kingdom, Black Swan, Happy Christmas, Primer, Listen Up Philip, and others. Watch below to learn more about the aesthetic and what makes 16mm "so darn cool." Thanks to our friends at The Film Stage for the tip on this video essay. Original description from Vimeo: "Film nerds like »

- Alex Billington

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Paramount hires former Indian Paintbrush and Miramax executive

6 April 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Peter McPartlin joins major.

Paramount Pictures has named Peter McPartlin as executive vice president, strategic planning and business operations.

McPartlin joins from Us production outfit Indian Paintbrush, which has produced Wes Anderson’s The Darjeeling Limited and Moonrise Kingdom, where he was COO and executive vice president of business and legal affairs.

He has also previously served as vice president of business and legal affairs at Miramax Films.

At Paramount, McPartlin will report to COO Andrew Gumpert, and will have a remit of identifying new business opportunities for the company and evaluating potential investments.

Gumpert commented on the hire: “As an incredibly skilled strategic executive, with a terrific track record for identifying new business opportunities, Peter will be a tremendous asset to the studio. I’m thrilled to have him join me and the team at Paramount to continue to identify and grow opportunities across our divisions.”

McPartlin added: “It’s a very exciting time to join »

- tom.grater@screendaily.com (Tom Grater)

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Paramount hires former Indian Paintbrush and Miramax exec

6 April 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Peter McPartlin joins major.

Paramount Pictures has named Peter McPartlin as executive vice president, strategic planning and business operations.

McPartlin joins from Us production outfit Indian Paintbrush, which has produced Wes Anderson’s The Darjeeling Limited and Moonrise Kingdom, where he was COO and executive vice president of business and legal affairs.

He has also previously served as vice president of business and legal affairs at Miramax Films.

At Paramount, McPartlin will report to COO Andrew Gumpert, and will have a remit of identifying new business opportunities for the company and evaluating potential investments.

Gumpert commented on the hire: “As an incredibly skilled strategic executive, with a terrific track record for identifying new business opportunities, Peter will be a tremendous asset to the studio. I’m thrilled to have him join me and the team at Paramount to continue to identify and grow opportunities across our divisions.”

McPartlin added: “It’s a very exciting time to join »

- tom.grater@screendaily.com (Tom Grater)

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Film History Royalty: Jean-Pierre Léaud as Louis Xiv

31 March 2017 10:52 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The 400 Blows. Courtesy of ShutterstockFor many directors, casting decisions are a crucial part of the writing process. They set the parameters in which the character can develop itself. Fundamentally, a good casting decision can make a character transcend its own scripted ambitions into wonderful, unexpected territories. But bad casting, as we know, can cripple not just a character’s potential but the entire film. It’s hard to talk about casting choices as creative decisions since they are so ingrained within certain creative impulses—the decision of choosing a particular actor over another can be based on mere gut feeling, a hunch, or an intellectual response. But of course, it can also depend (as it often does in large budget films) on an actor’s status, reputation or his or her monetary value. As we get to know actors, we see them typecast or cast against type but sometimes »

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Focus Features Celebrates ‘Brokeback Mountain,’ ‘Lost in Translation’ and More in Retrospective Supercut — Watch

30 March 2017 2:30 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Focus Features has gone through some changes in year since it merged with Universal Pictures, but its credentials as an important distributor over the last 15 years are beyond dispute. The company has released a supercut celebrating the films it’s released since its inception in 2002. Watch below.

Read More: Focus Features Presents ‘The Beguiled,’ ‘Victoria and Abdul,’ ‘Darkest Hour,’ and Its 15th Anniversary

It’s a long list of notable films: “Milk,” “Lost in Translation,” “The Theory of Everything,” “Brokeback Mountain,” “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind,” “Moonrise Kingdom,” “The Place Beyond the Pines,” “Shaun of the Dead,” “Beginners,” “Burn After Reading,” “The Pianist” and many more are all included.

Read More: Annapurna Pictures Supercut Celebrates ‘The Master,’ ‘Spring Breakers’ and More Hits — Watch

Annapurna Pictures released a similar supercut earlier today celebrating its own roster, which includes the likes of “Spring Breakers,” “Her” and “20th Century Women.” Focus, which »

- Michael Nordine

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Focus Features Unveils 2017 Slate: ‘The Beguiled,’ ‘Victoria and Abdul,’ ‘The Book Of Henry,’ More – CinemaCon

29 March 2017 3:20 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

“The reality of the motion picture business is that a film is not truly complete until it plays in a theater,” Peter Kujawski, chairman of Focus Features, said today during the label’s presentation at CinemaCon. It is the shared experience “that makes our human experience better.” Kujawski then introduced a Focus reel that included a host of previous films from the banner including Milk, The Theory Of Everything, Moonrise Kingdom, Lost In Translation, Dallas Buyers Club, C… »

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Trailer Watch: Frances McDormand Takes on the Police in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

27 March 2017 10:02 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, M

“What’s the law on what you can and cannot say on a billboard?” Frances McDormand asks in a newly released Red Band trailer for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.” The Oscar winner plays Mildred, a woman whose daughter was murdered seven months prior. As her question suggests, she’s not looking to put up a typical billboard — she doesn’t want a supersized photo of her late child, or details about a reward. Mildred is planning on using the advertising space to critique the local police, who have yet to find the culprit.

As the film’s official synopsis details, Mildred decides go ahead and make the bold move, “painting three signs leading into her town with a controversial message directed at William Willoughby (Woody Harrelson), the town’s revered chief of police. When his second-in-command Officer Dixon (Sam Rockwell), an immature mother’s boy with a penchant for violence, gets involved, the battle between Mildred and Ebbing’s law enforcement is only exacerbated.”

“It seems to me the police department is too busy torturing black folks to solve actual crimes,” Mildred tells a journalist in the spot. This is not the kind of person who worries about making enemies. The hilarious Nsfw trailer shows Mildred verbally — and physically — attacking those who stand in her way. This seems like an amazing role for McDormand, who can communicate what an insufferable moron she thinks someone is using only her eyes.

McDormand won an Oscar in 1997 for “Fargo.” Her recent credits include “Hail, Caesar!” “Olive Kitteridge,” and “Moonrise Kingdom.”

The “Almost Famous” actress has identified the “main point” of feminism as “equal pay for equal work,” which has yet to be realized in the film world. “I haven’t been given that,” McDormand revealed at a Cannes event in 2015. She admitted that she’s only met her quote once — on “Transformers 3” — and still, it was less than an actor in her league would have made. “I worked very hard for that money, I’m very proud of my work. I’m glad I did that film, and I’m proud that I finally got paid what I was told I was worth by the industry,” she explained. “But that is nothing. That is a tenth of what most males my age, with my experience and my reputation as a film actor, make. We’ve never been paid commensurately, and that has to change,” she emphasized.

Written and directed by Martin McDonagh (“In Bruges,” “Seven Psychopaths”) “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” is expected to hit theaters this year. No word on a specific release date yet.

https://medium.com/media/0a2af74d14cfcc127efde19a6fbbbd1d/href

Trailer Watch: Frances McDormand Takes on the Police in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Netflix is Going to Release ‘Okja’ in Theaters

8 March 2017 7:07 AM, PST | bloody-disgusting.com | See recent Bloody-Disgusting.com news »

Welp, Netflix is beta testing theatrical releases and will do so with Okja, which was filmed last year in Seoul, South Korea. From director Bong Joon Ho (Snowpiercer, The Host, Mother), Okja is produced by Plan B, Lewis Pictures and Kate Street Picture Company, and stars Tilda Swinton (Snowpiercer, Doctor Strange, Hail, Caesar!, Moonrise Kingdom), Jake Gyllenhaal (Donnie Darko, Nightcrawler, Everest) and Paul Dano (Love & Mercy, […] »

- Brad Miska

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Wamg Giveaway – Win the Manchester By The Sea Blu-ray

1 March 2017 5:22 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Academy Award winner Casey Affleck delivers an unforgettable performance in the heartwarming, emotional, and powerful Manchester By The Sea , which arrived on Digital HD February 7 and on Blu-ray Combo Pack (plus DVD and Digital HD), DVD and On Demand February 21 from Lionsgate. The award-winning 2016 Sundance Film Festival Official Entry follows Affleck’s character Lee, as he faces the ghosts of his past when he returns to his New England hometown to take care of his teenage nephew. Academy Award nominee Michelle Williams, Emmy Award winner Kyle Chandler (Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series, “Friday Night Lights,” 2006), Gretchen Mol (3:10 to Yuma), and Lucas Hedges (Moonrise Kingdom) also star in the film, which was written and directed by Academy Award nominee Kenneth Lonergan. Critically acclaimed since its debut, the film was nominated for five Golden Globes, four Screen Actors Guild Awards, and has won the Golden Globe for Best Actor – Drama for Affleck, »

- Tom Stockman

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‘Okja’ Teaser Show’s Netflix’s New “Monster”

28 February 2017 5:49 AM, PST | bloody-disgusting.com | See recent Bloody-Disgusting.com news »

Netflix shared the first teaser trailer for its feature film Okja, which was filmed last year in Seoul, South Korea. From director Bong Joon Ho (Snowpiercer, The Host, Mother), Okja is produced by Plan B, Lewis Pictures and Kate Street Picture Company, and stars Tilda Swinton (Snowpiercer, Doctor Strange, Hail, Caesar!, Moonrise Kingdom), Jake Gyllenhaal (Donnie Darko, Nightcrawler, Everest) and Paul Dano (Love & Mercy, 12 Years a Slave) […] »

- Brad Miska

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Votd: See Even More of Wes Anderson’s Visual Influences & References

23 February 2017 6:00 AM, PST | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Late last summer, we featured a video that took a look at some of the visual influences and references of filmmaker Wes Anderson. The director of The Royal Tenenbaums, Moonrise Kingdom, Grand Budapest Hotel, Fantastic Mr. Fox and more has a unique visual style that is unmistakable. But just like most great filmmakers, he steals […]

The post Votd: See Even More of Wes Anderson’s Visual Influences & References appeared first on /Film. »

- Ethan Anderton

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Blu-ray Review: The Tree Of Wooden Clogs, Far From a Wooden Slog

19 February 2017 9:00 AM, PST | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

"I'm going to find a tree to chop down." That line, perhaps familiar from another film released by Criterion, Moonrise Kingdom, also applies to this new release by the company, respected Italian director Ermanno Olmi's 1978 Palme D'or winner, The Tree of Wooden Clogs. Like Bill Murray in the afore-referenced Wes Anderson fave, Tree also features a despondent father with a literal ax to grind as part of its sprawling ensemble. Except, Olmi's makeshift lumberjack is no laughing matter. He dare not utter of his tree chopping. He has his reasons; reasons which prove impactful and costly. Olmi's The Tree of Wooden Clogs is, like Malick's The New World, one of those rare period films that has built its world so well, it's easy to...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

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BBC Films: who’s in the running for the top job?

14 February 2017 11:00 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Screen considers potential runners and riders.

The BBC is likely to announce its new head of film within the next two weeks, according to sources close to the process.

Scroll down for potential candidates and the original job spec

That timetable should come as a relief to those under consideration for the role and to wider industry who will want to begin building or growing their relationship with the new boss.

The job, which is considered one of the UK’s most prestigious posts, became vacant in autumn 2016 following the departure of long-time chief Christine Langan. BBC Films veteran Joe Oppenheimer has been serving as acting head of film since then.

The incoming head of film is expected to have an annual war chest of around £12m for production, cementing BBC Films’ position as one the three mainstays of public funding in the UK along with the BFI and Film4.

The organisation advertised the position (as ‘director »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Manchester By The Sea Starring Casey Affleck on Blu-ray & DVD February 21st

8 February 2017 8:15 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Academy Award nominee Casey Affleck delivers an unforgettable, Golden Globe-winning performance in the heartwarming, emotional, and powerful Manchester By The Sea , arriving on Digital HD February 7 and on Blu-ray Combo Pack (plus DVD and Digital HD), DVD and On Demand February 21 from Lionsgate. The award-winning 2016 Sundance Film Festival Official Entry follows Affleck’s character Lee, as he faces the ghosts of his past when he returns to his New England hometown to take care of his teenage nephew. Academy Award nominee Michelle Williams, Emmy Award winner Kyle Chandler (Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series, “Friday Night Lights,” 2006), Gretchen Mol (3:10 to Yuma), and Lucas Hedges (Moonrise Kingdom) also star in the film, which was written and directed by Academy Award nominee Kenneth Lonergan. Critically acclaimed since its debut, the film was nominated for five Golden Globes, four Screen Actors Guild Awards, and has won the Golden Globe for Best Actor – Drama for Affleck, »

- Tom Stockman

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Oscars 2017: Why Mahershala Ali Will Beat Jeff Bridges for Supporting Actor

6 February 2017 8:13 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

As the Hollywood guilds lay out their winners, a clear frontrunner has emerged in the Supporting Actor category. We dig into the final five contenders, listed in order of likelihood to win the Oscar:

Mahershala Ali popped out at Telluride and Toronto from Barry Jenkins’ “Moonlight” (A24) ensemble in the beating-heart role of the Cuban-born drug-dealer who nurtures the young boy “Little.” Ali stood out in part because he was better-known than the film’s other actors, enjoying a breakout year as a swath of projects hit screens.

Dauntingly, he shot three of them at the same time. In New York, he was violent New York gangster Cottonmouth on Marvel’s Netflix series “Luke Cage.” In Baltimore, he continued the fourth (and, voluntarily, his last) season of his Emmy-nominated role as Remy Danton, the slick former communications director for Frank Underwood, in “House of Cards.” And in Miami, on three successive weekends, »

- Anne Thompson

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Oscars 2017: Why Mahershala Ali Will Beat Jeff Bridges for Supporting Actor

6 February 2017 8:13 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As the Hollywood guilds lay out their winners, a clear frontrunner has emerged in the Supporting Actor category. We dig into the final five contenders, listed in order of likelihood to win the Oscar:

Mahershala Ali popped out at Telluride and Toronto from Barry Jenkins’ “Moonlight” (A24) ensemble in the beating-heart role of the Cuban-born drug-dealer who nurtures the young boy “Little.” Ali stood out in part because he was better-known than the film’s other actors, enjoying a breakout year as a swath of projects hit screens.

Dauntingly, he shot three of them at the same time. In New York, he was violent New York gangster Cottonmouth on Marvel’s Netflix series “Luke Cage.” In Baltimore, he continued the fourth (and, voluntarily, his last) season of his Emmy-nominated role as Remy Danton, the slick former communications director for Frank Underwood, in “House of Cards.” And in Miami, on three successive weekends, »

- Anne Thompson

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

1-20 of 29 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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