Arthur Payne, recently out of prison, meets a stranger on a train and explains his situation. A few days later another stranger makes a curious proposition. Arthur should participate in a ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Maurice Denham ...
Theo Gaunt
...
Insp. Jackson
Maria Corvin ...
Nicole Romain
Brian Peck ...
Arthur Payne
Anthony Bate ...
Ray Underwood
John Arnatt ...
Supt. Ross
Manning Wilson ...
Sgt. Bates
Pamela Greer ...
Sally
Eric Dodson ...
Walker
Reginald Barratt ...
'Pop' Medwin
Billy Milton ...
Simpson
Harry Littlewood ...
Ticket Collector
Morgan Latimer ...
Mrs. Gaunt
David Browning ...
Clarke
Roy Patrick ...
Policeman
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Storyline

Arthur Payne, recently out of prison, meets a stranger on a train and explains his situation. A few days later another stranger makes a curious proposition. Arthur should participate in a fake robbery and remove some imitation jewelry from the stranger's own safe.

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Drama

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1963 (UK)  »

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1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of a series of second feature films based on Edgar Wallace novels, released between 1960 and 1965 in British cinemas. The films were later sold to American TV and screened there as The Edgar Wallace Mystery Theatre (1960). See more »

Goofs

The character played by Pamela Greer is credited as "Sally" but is introduced as "Pamela Shaw". See more »

Connections

Edited into The Edgar Wallace Mystery Theatre: The Set Up (1963) See more »

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User Reviews

 
A frame-up and a blackmail set up make for a top entry in this series
23 November 2016 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

"The Set Up" (1963) is one of the better entries in the British "Edgar Wallace" series from the early sixties, which means it's very good indeed, inasmuch as the typical entry is good.

The one and only IMDb review so far, done in 2013 by Robin Moss, has it exactly right that this film has good acting and "sharp" photography. Those two properties occur in all the films in the "Edgar Wallace Mystery Theatre" that I've seen, which is quite a few. I often do not know the names and faces, but it doesn't matter. The photography is post-noir (60s noir). It's not flashy like some 70s photography. It's not as shadowed as earlier noir, but it still has some interesting contrast at times. The key thing is that it maintains a rather high degree of intensity in the interiors. It's not with a lot of closeups as we'd see on a television series. Rather, people confront one another in fuller body shots and movement. The sets are well-produced. The attire and grooming are clean mostly, as befits the early 60s. This is before jeans and sloppiness and stubble came in. The music is cued to the action in classic style. It is not influenced by 70s funk or electronic instrumentation.

I recognized Maurice Denham in this episode. At the outset, he does a good deed for a recently-released prisoner (Brian Peck). One must in this case beware of balding middle-aged men who have mistresses and wish to remove their wives from the picture. But such men had also better beware of themselves being set up for blackmail.


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