6.1/10
995
16 user 43 critic

Hunky Dory (2011)

Not Rated | | Comedy, Drama, Music | 22 March 2013 (USA)
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In the heat of the summer of 1976, drama teacher Vivienne fights sweltering heat and general teenage apathy to put on an end-of-term version of Shakespeare's The Tempest.

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(screenplay)
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Kristian Gwilliam ...
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Evan (as Tom Harries)
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Dafydd Llyr-Thomas ...
Syd / Member, Cwmtawe Community School Choir
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Headmaster (as Bob Pugh)
Jodi Davis ...
Mandy (as Jodie Davis)
Ryan Hacker ...
Daz
Lewis Coster ...
Davy's Friend
Sam Shervill ...
Davy's Friend
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Storyline

In the heat of the summer of 1976, keen drama teacher Vivienne fights sweltering heat and general teenage apathy to put on an end of year music version of Shakespeare's The Tempest. To engage her students, she uses hits of the time, which will be performed by a fresh young cast led by rising star Aneurin Barnard. Written by Websurfer

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Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Music

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

22 March 2013 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

O Musical de Verão  »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$2,695 (USA) (29 March 2013)

Gross:

$19,041 (USA) (5 May 2013)
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2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Producer Jonathan Finn said Minnie Driver was as much fun on the set as she is in the film. See more »

Goofs

The song Livin' Thing (written by Jeff Lynne, performed by ELO), did not chart in the UK until 13 Nov 1976 and would not have been known during the Summer of 76. See more »

Quotes

Evan: Do you ever feel like an alien? Like sometimes I think I've been stranded on this planet, and that one day they're gonna come and pick me up. Take me back.
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Crazy Credits

All The Car Booters of South Wales (you know who you are) See more »

Connections

References The Incredible Hulk (1978) See more »

Soundtracks

Strange Magic
Written by Jeff Lynne
Performed by Danielle Branch
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User Reviews

 
don't let the critics put you off
8 March 2012 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

People have complained that this film is too formulaic, it's too glossy and sugar-coated and that it's so steeped in saccharine sentimentality that it will make the overpriced, syrupy Coke that you bought from the multiplex foyer seem sour and flat.

While there is definitely truth in the above statement, I think enjoyment of this (and any) film depends on your attitude. If you go into this film expecting to see some gritty socio-political drama focussing on the oppression of Welsh mining classes, you will be sorely disappointed. You will come out complaining about how populist it is, how it's so conventionally structured and emotionally sensationalist etc, etc.

The poster is a lovely snapshot of a group of idyllic young friends having fun in the blistering summer of 1976. It's all orange and glowing. The trailer gives a taste of how packed the film is with poppy love songs of the era, how predictable the premise makes the plot, how familiar the angsty teenage characters are, how petty the conflicts seem in this hazy summer utopia of a bygone Britain and how indulgently reminiscent it is.

It's called Hunky Dory.

The signs are there - everything about the design screams out feel-good mainstream movie. It is unashamedly populist, unashamedly sensational and is obviously going to be as conventional as any piece of popular cinema. There's nothing subtle about the way the film advertises this sense of style.

To know all this, watch the film then criticize it for the glaringly obvious is lazy criticism, at best. Don't go and see the film if you know you're going to suffer an adverse reaction to the sheer amount of light-heartedness going on. That's like going into a screening of Shrek with your arms folded for the entire movie then coming out in a huff saying to your bemused/horrified children "the guy's an ogre but not once did I see a man's skin being peeled off while he was still alive."

For those more willing to accept this film for what it so blatantly is, I'd say it's an easy, feel-good film with and great 70's soundtrack (from the likes of Bowie and ELO) and superb Welsh accents throughout. A coming-of-age film set in a specific place and moment in British history, it shares an obvious affinity to Ricky Gervais and Stephen Mechant's Cemetery Junction as well as Billy Elliot (a couple of the producers made this film too).

There are a lot of characters so the attempt to squeeze in all of their individual stories is overly ambitious, but the cast are great. Minnie Driver is easily lovable and I get the feeling you'll be seeing a lot more of Aneurin Barnard's face in the future. The ending is a little bit vague and they try and remedy this by giving a 'where are they now' sequence during the end credits – which is a bit half-baked (no reference to the recreational activities of the time intended).

Overall, a likable film with some nice messages (namely Karl Marx's sentiment "don't let the b*st*rds grind you down") and a well-polished style that makes for easy watching.

http://ionlyaskedwhatyouthought.blogspot.com/


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