Critic Reviews

44

Metascore

Based on 38 critic reviews provided by Metacritic.com
75
We're the Millers is just good enough to keep you entertained, but not good enough to keep your mind from wandering from time to time. This is an aggressively funny comedy that takes a lot of chances, and connects just often enough.
75
Needless to say, the shapely Aniston pulls it off without a hitch - even if she never actually appears without a stitch. If this gutsy performance leads to better opportunities-a remake of Demi Moore's ill-conceived "Striptease," perhaps - I might sleep better at night.
63
An innocuously smutty road comedy.
50
Get past the comedy and there's something almost weird at the movie's core - a deep cynicism about family and a longing for family, both at the same time.
50
It's half of a good movie, and another half that no one asked for or wanted.
50
We're the Millers is nothing but stems and seeds, with less buzz than a bag of oregano.
50
Though the cast partially eschews the family-friendly timidity that the film defers to in the end, this would-be wild thing remains little more than a rowdy endorsement of the status quo.
50
It's an August dog-day special, in other words: a few easy laughs, one or two flashes of inspiration, and enough sentimentality to ensure that no one actually gets hurt.
40
The “Millers” script - it took four writers to cobble together something that seems so slight - hits too many obvious notes between the moments when Aniston can strut her stuff.
40
Director Rawson Marshall Thurber adequately manages the mechanics demanded here but adds no finesse or grace notes.
38
It aims for that “Hangover” blend of the sick and the sentimental. And it doesn't work.
38
When Jason Sudeikis and Ed Helms appear in the same movie there's a significant threat of clean-cut sameness. Mediocre material makes them like two halves of the same comic actor: Ed Jason Helms-Sudeikis.
38
We're the Millers is a twisted road trip worth avoiding. Not only is it not funny, it's offensive.
38
If there is a breakout role in Millers, it is that of Will Poulter, the 20-year-old English actor who played Lee Carter in 2007's "Son of Rambow." As Kenny Rossmore, the hapless neighbor who ends up playing the teenage son of Ms. Aniston and Mr. Sudeikis during their version of National Lampoon's Mexican Vacation, Mr. Poulter strikes a perfect comedic balance between sweet savant and pop-culture lech.
25
The movie, directed by the formerly promising Rawson Marshall Thurber (the hilarious “Dodgeball” and the awful “The Mysteries of Pittsburgh”), thinks it's subverting the conventions of the sitcom with a revolutionary new idea, which is: Do everything exactly the way a sitcom would, plus lots of swearing and dirty jokes.

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