Six Western, relatively spoiled English youths visits underdeveloped places overseas where some of the luxury goods or crucial components are produced they take for granted. They not only ... See full summary »
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2010  

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Six Western, relatively spoiled English youths visits underdeveloped places overseas where some of the luxury goods or crucial components are produced they take for granted. They not only visit, but experience the harsh life of Third World laborers often backbreaking, dangerous, poorly paid jobs. Written by KGF Vissers

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1 February 2010 (USA)  »

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This series is a gem!
6 May 2014 | by (Australia) – See all my reviews

A wonderful inside look at how the consumer goods we take for granted are actually produced.

Take six spoiled, entitled Brits and drop them into the garment industry in India to sink or swim. Clearly these people have never lived, or even visited, the developing world. From their shock at the basic living conditions to their umbrage at the working conditions, we see how they cope with being plonked into a developing world factory.

The girl of Indian descent seems to have no knowledge whatsoever of life in her parent's homeland. Everyone is taken aback at the strictness and discipline required of factory workers. Some adapt better than others, as you will see. Despite always having the 'parachute' of returning to their comfortable lives, the participants are visibly changed by what they experience.

This series is notable for introducing the world to the wonderful Stacey Dooley. Currently (as of 2014) the best investigative journalist in the world (IMO) we can see Stacey's inquisitive yet lovely nature shining through. The camera loves Stacey. Curiously, the producers didn't seem to know this before the series aired as Stacey is not even mentioned in the opening sequences.

As someone who has lived for a long time in the developing world I can whole-heartedly recommend this excellent series as compulsory viewing for anyone interested in how other people live. An easy 9/10.


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