7.8/10
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Schooling the World (2010)

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If you wanted to change an ancient culture in a generation, how would you do it? You would change the way it educates its children. The U.S. Government knew this in the 19th century when it... See full summary »

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Manish Jain
Helena Norberg-Hodge

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If you wanted to change an ancient culture in a generation, how would you do it? You would change the way it educates its children. The U.S. Government knew this in the 19th century when it forced Native American children into government boarding schools. Today, volunteers build schools in traditional societies around the world, convinced that school is the only way to a 'better' life for indigenous children. But is this true? What really happens when we replace a traditional culture's way of learning and understanding the world with our own? SCHOOLING THE WORLD takes a challenging, sometimes funny, ultimately deeply disturbing look at the effects of modern education on the world's last sustainable indigenous cultures. Written by Anonymous

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Schooling the World: The White Man's Last Burden  »

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Really?
11 June 2014 | by (New Zealand) – See all my reviews

There's something to be said for the point being made, that people should be more involved in what their charitable donations support. Of course education programs should be sensitive to the cultures of the countries that they are in.

However, this ridiculous hour long argument with a straw man from the white guilt overcompensation crew is just a straight up disservice to that cause. It almost totally ignores everything good about the myriad of achievements of western society. Just constant shots of L'Oreal billboards interspersed with poor kids that treats western culture like it's the great Satan. It's not the only way to do things, but to say that there is little merit in the education system that (for example) put people on the moon is just bad documentary making.

The reality, if you've ever traveled and taught in developing countries around the world, is that there is demand for a modern education. In fact, the mass rote learning that they display so much is something that you rarely see anymore in modern schooling systems in the developed world. It's ironically the foreigners overseas who are the most put off by the Orwellian rote learned techniques applied in those schools The problems are probably more of a product of poverty. A teacher to student ratio of 1:60 really limits the style of teaching you can employ. That (for example) would of been a really great angle to explore, or just the question "Hey, why do you send your kid there?" or "What would you change about the school that these foreigners made?" but they just had absolutely 0 interest in making this informative.

This documentary ironically taught it's viewers exactly the same way as the education system it sought to disparage. "This is how it is. This is the right way to think. That's it."


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