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10 Great Directors Who Should Make Horror Movies — IndieWire Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
10 Great Directors Who Should Make Horror Movies — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What filmmaker would you most like to see try their hand at a horror movie?

Kristy Puchko (@KristyPuchko), Pajiba/Riot Material

I struggled with this question, because a lot of the directors I have adored have worked in horror, be it Tim Burton (“Beetlejuice,” “Edward Scissorhands”), Robert Zemeckis (“Death Becomes Her”), Edgar Wright (“Shawn of the Dead”), Frank Oz (“Little Shop of Horror”), Guillermo del Toro (“Crimson Peak”), Bong-Joon Ho (“The Host”), Jim Jarmusch (“Only Lovers Left Alive”), or Taika Waititi (“What We Do In the Shadows”). Part of what I love about the genre is the way is can be reshaped with vision, color,
See full article at Indiewire »

Your Alternative Halloween Viewing Guide: Hidden Horror Gems to Make Movie Night Frighteningly Fun

Your Alternative Halloween Viewing Guide: Hidden Horror Gems to Make Movie Night Frighteningly Fun
Every Halloween, when you want to check out a horror movie to get your heart racing, or a hilarious scary movie send-up to celebrate the holiday with laughs, everybody seems to cycle back to some of the same old classics.

While the slasher movies we've all come to know and love are classics for a reason (see: Halloween, I Know What You Did Last Summer or Scream), it’s fun to dive a little deeper into the realm of obscure horror, where some of the truly great fright flicks hide in the shadows.

Check out Et’s suggestions for some of the great lesser-known gems of spooky cinema with this year's alternative Halloween viewing guide:

Vampire Movies

Typical Fare: Bram Stoker's Dracula, The Lost Boys, From Dusk Till Dawn

Alternative Option: Let the Right One In

This thoughtful Swedish horror tale, directed by Tomas Alfredson, is an entirely unique take on the well-trod territory of vampire
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Tilda Swinton Reteaming With Jim Jarmusch For New Film

  • The Playlist
When Tilda Swinton works with a director she likes, there’s a good chance she’ll wind up making another movie with them should the opportunity arise. One of the filmmakers on her Rolodex is Jim Jarmusch, with the pair previously collaborating on “Broken Flowers,” “The Limits Of Control,” and “Only Lovers Left Alive.” Now, it looks like she’s gearing up to re-team with the filmmaker once again.

Continue reading Tilda Swinton Reteaming With Jim Jarmusch For New Film at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Anya Taylor-Joy Reteaming With The Witch Director For Nosferatu Remake

After causing quite a stir with his horror film The Witch, which was divisive, to say the least, director Robert Eggers is staying firmly in the genre which put him on the map. That’s because he’s set to remake the classic horror flick Nosferatu. He’s been attached to it for a while now, actually, but it was only recently that he confirmed he’d be doing it as his next project.

“[It’s shocking] to me,” Eggers said. “It feels ugly and blasphemous and egomaniacal and disgusting for a filmmaker in my place to do Nosferatu next. I was really planning on waiting a while, but that’s how fate shook out.”

Unfortunately, there hasn’t been much progress on the pic in a while now, but tonight, we’ve got a pretty big update, as we’re learning that the director will be reteaming with Anya Taylor-Joy after working together on The Witch.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

The 25 Best Documentaries of the 21st Century, from ‘Amy’ to ‘The Act of Killing’

  • Indiewire
The 25 Best Documentaries of the 21st Century, from ‘Amy’ to ‘The Act of Killing’
Non-fiction cinema never stops evolving. From the Actualités of the Lumière brothers to the heavily manipulated ethnographic films of the 1920, from the vérité Americans of the Maysles brothers to the man-on-the-street approach popularized by Michael Moore, documentaries have naturally always been more responsive to their times than any other mode of filmmaking.

Not only do they reveal our world to us, but they shape how we view it, and the early years of the 21st century have proven that to be more true than ever before. On one hand, digital technology has infinitely expanded our range of vision, and some of the modern era’s most essential docs have been shot on consumer-grade equipment like iPhones and GoPro cameras. On the other hand, these tools haven’t just granted us new ways of seeing, they’ve also galvanized our desire to look, which in turn has stoked an unprecedented degree
See full article at Indiewire »

Jim Jarmusch’s Band Sqürl Has a New Record — Listen

  • Indiewire
Jim Jarmusch’s Band Sqürl Has a New Record — Listen
Jim Jarmusch hasn’t shared any news about his next film project, but the writer-director of 2016’s “Paterson” recently released some new original music from his rock band, Sqürl. The group’s fourth mini-album, “Ep #260,” features five songs, only one of which includes vocals – “Gates of Ishtar.” The heavily instrumental music sounds a lot like a film score, which makes sense considering Sqürl first came together to compose the soundtrack for Jarmusch’s 2009 crime-drama “The Limits of Control.” The band’s first name was Bad Rabbit.

Read MorePaul Thomas Anderson’s New Short Film ‘Valentine’ Is an Exquisite Rock Opera

Sqürl’s members include Vampire Weekend sound engineer Shane Stoneback and “Paterson” composer (and film producer) Carter Logan. Jozef van Wissem (with whom Jarmusch has collaborated on two separate records) has also worked with the band. Sqürl’s cover of the Wanda Jackson song “Funnel of Love,” which features singer Madeline Follin of Cults,
See full article at Indiewire »

Locarno: France’s Luxbox Acquires ‘Cocote’ Sales Rights (Exclusive)

Locarno: France’s Luxbox Acquires ‘Cocote’ Sales Rights (Exclusive)
In the run-up to Switzerland’s Locarno Festival, Paris-based sales company Luxbox has acquired world sales rights to “Cocote,” one of this year’s standout titles from the Dominican Republic.

The fiction feature debut of Nelson Carlo de los Santos, whose feature length essay, “Santa Teresa y otras historias,” won Best Latin-American Film at 2015’s Mar del Plata Festival, ”Cocote” stands out from most Dominican productions in its three-way international co-production backing from Dr’s Guasabara Cine, Argentina’s Nabis Filmgroup (“One Sister”) and Germany’s Pandora Film Produktion (“The Other Side of Hope,” “Only Lovers Left Alive”).

Winning this April the Iff Panama’s Primera Mirada, a pix-in-post showcase, “Cocote” featured one month later at the Cannes Film Market in a Panama Goes to Cannes special screening. It will world premiere at Locarno in its Signs of Life section. A sidebar aiming to explore frontier territories in the seventh art, the festival has said,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Richard Linklater Celebrates the Bygone Era of the Video Store

  • Indiewire
Richard Linklater Celebrates the Bygone Era of the Video Store
The following excerpt serves as the forward to the paperback edition of Tom Roston’s book “I Lost It at the Video Store: A Filmmaker’s Oral History of a Vanished Era,” which is now available here. The new edition features more interviews with younger screen stars, including Paul Dano and Zoe Kazan, as well as new era film visionaries such as Tim League and Burnie Burns.

If you’re a film freak much under the age of 40, you likely have no personal memory of the history of film being anywhere other than at your fingertips. Those of us older than that lived through the last era of “cinematic scarcity.” And it was no joke—I remember putting in for vacation time from work just to be sure I could finally see “Mean Streets”—I saw that it was scheduled to show in a month or so for one night
See full article at Indiewire »

9 Outrageous Tilda Swinton Transformations at the Movies

  • Indiewire
9 Outrageous Tilda Swinton Transformations at the Movies
There’s nothing Tilda Swinton can’t do. The 56-year-old actress is currently starring in Bong Joon Ho’s “Okja,” now available to stream on Netflix, which is the latest in a long history of roles that have completely transformed the way we see Swinton on the big screen. The actress shifts her looks and mannerisms from role to role, refusing to give audiences the same performance twice and constantly redefining the limits of her talent. She’s the closest thing we have to a cinematic chameleon.

Read More: ‘Okja’ Includes a Blink-And-You’ll-Miss-It Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama Reference

Okja” is the second Bong movie to completely transform Swinton, following her eye-popping presence as the villain in “Snowpiercer.” The word “unrecognizable” is thrown around a lot when talking about Swinton’s recent work, and for good reason. But what unites her many different performances is an unwavering commitment to her characters,
See full article at Indiewire »

New to Streaming: ‘The Bad Batch,’ ‘Summer Hours,’ ‘Kong: Skull Island,’ ‘Paterson,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Bad Batch (Ana Lily Amirpour)

Ana Lily Amirpour’s second feature shoots for Harmony Korine meets Mad Max and would have nearly almost hit the mark were it not for the gratingly aloof attitude and the swaths of directorial license being taken. The Bad Batch — an ambitious, expansive dystopian sci-fi western which features partying, drugs, and cannibals — might come as music to the ears of diehard fans of films like Spring Breakers and Gummo (a kid doesn’t quite eat spaghetti in a bathtub, but a kid does eat spaghetti after being in a bathtub). However, beneath its dazzlingly hip surface the script and characters leave much to be desired. It’s like taking a trip to Burning Man: a pseudo-spiritual, uniquely punky experience perhaps, but one that’s full of annoying rich kids and ultimately emotionally shallow. – Rory O. (full review)

Where to Stream: Amazon, iTunes

Kong: Skull Island (Jordan Vogt-Roberts)

Though it may not feel fully inspired so much as competently pre-visualized, Kong: Skull Island fits snugly into the growing canon of reboots that exist within ever-expanding movie universes. That’s a first sentence to a positive review that perhaps reads a bit more cynically than intended. Directed by Jordan Vogt-Roberts and written by a bunch of dudes (Dan Gilroy and Max Borenstein and Derek Connolly with a story credited to John Gatins), this umpteenth version of the King Kong story pulls from every available pop-culture source in building a fun creature feature. Much of the credit goes to the breathtaking effects and brisk pace, which distract from some lofty line readings and silly plot devices. – Dan M. (full review)

Where to Stream: Amazon, iTunes, Google

Le Trou (Jacques Becker)

One of the greatest prison escape dramas of all-time, Jacques Becker’s recently-restored Le Trou is a masterclass in tension. By putting us both in the physical and psychological headspace of our protagonists, it’s an enveloping experience as we see a number of close calls, leading up to one of the most unforgettable endings in cinema. – Jordan r.

Where to Stream: Mubi (free 30-day trial)

Moana (John Musker and Ron Clements)

It’s time for another Disney Princess movie, and you know how it goes. Disney knows too, and wants you to know that it knows. When the title character of Moana (Auli’i Cravalho) denies that she’s a princess, claiming that she’s merely the daughter of her island’s chief and the next chieftain, her adventuring partner Maui (Dwayne Johnson) asserts, “Same difference,” and that, “You wear a dress and have an animal sidekick. You’re a princess.” But Disney is doing its best to make the culture rethink cinematic fantasy princesses, countering the stereotypes of helpless femininity (which the studio largely put in place) with a new roster of highly capable action heroines. And Moana is, as they call it, a good role model. And the movie around her is fine. – Dan S. (full review)

Where to Stream: Netflix

Nobody Speak: Trials of the Free Press (Brian Knappenberger)

Nobody Speak: Trials of the Free Press uses a salacious story and website as the launching pad to discuss where we currently are, so much so that I imagine director Brian Knappenberger — who uses footage from President Trump’s infamous press conference only a few days before the film’s Sundance premiere — may wish to stay on the story. Gawker, a site spun out of Gizmodo, was founded to share the types of stories mainstream news outlets would often shy away from, including celebrity sex tapes, outings, drug use, and allegations that have swirled but not picked up traction. They’ve featured Rob Ford smoking crack, Bill Cosby’s multiple accusers, Hillary Clinton’s emails, Tom Cruise’s prominent role in Scientology, and the one that brought them down: the infamous Hulk Hogan sex tape recorded for private use by Hogan pal and infamous Tampa shock jock Bubba the Love Sponge Clem, best known nationally for his stint on Howard Stern’s satellite channel. Bubba’s antics will no doubt some day be the subject of a documentary of their own, from his role in both the Hogan affair to his odd appearance in the David Petraeus saga. – John F. (full review)

Where to Stream: Netflix

Paterson (Jim Jarmusch)

Jim Jarmusch proved he was back in a major way with Only Lovers Left Alive a few years ago, and the streak continues with Paterson, a calm, introspective drama with such positive views on marriage and creativity that I was left floored. In following the cyclical life of Adam Driver‘s Paterson, a bus driver in Paterson, New Jersey, who also has dreams of being a poet, Jarmusch superbly shows that one’s own life experience — however seemingly insubstantial — is the only requirement to produce something beautiful. Moreso than any other film in 2016, this is the kind of world I want to live in. – Jordan R.

Where to Stream: Amazon Prime

Star Trek Beyond (Justin Lin)

After the pleasant fluff of its kick-off installment and the frog march of unpleasantness that was Into Darkness, the rebooted Star Trek film series finally hits a fun median between big-budget bombast and classic Trek bigheartedness with Star Trek Beyond. Does the franchise’s full descent into action, with only the barest lip service paid to big ideas, cause Gene Roddenberry’s ashes to spin in their space capsule? Probably, but in the barren desert of summer 2016 blockbusters, this is a lovely oasis. – Dan S. (full review)

Where to Stream: Amazon Prime

Summer Hours (Olivier Assayas)

Perhaps a point of contention on New York Times’ top 25 films of the 21st century list, Olivier AssayasSummer Hours is a commendable top 10 pick. Led by Juliette Binoche, Charles Berling, Jérémie Renier, and Kyle Eastwood, this drama follows a family reuniting following the death of their mother. Like the best of Assayas’ films, it’s an impeccably-crafted, subtly-moving experience, one that wades in the ideas of the value of what we hold on to and a graceful reflection on the passage of time. – Jordan R.

Where to Stream: FilmStruck

Wilson (Craig Johnson)

The world of Daniel Clowes is one without manners, glamour, and tact, but it is also one of uncomfortable truth, as scathing as it might be. One may have never verbally conveyed the discourteous musings of his characters to the extent to which it is their everyday vernacular, but we’ve all had similar thoughts when life isn’t going our way. The latest adaptation of his work comes with Wilson, directed by Craig Johnson (The Skeleton Twins), featuring a role Woody Harrelson is clearly having the time of his life with. Despite his commitment to a lack of civility, there’s a darker film lying in the cynical heart of Wilson, one that gets squandered by its mawkish aesthetic and lack of interest in exploring these characters beyond their crudeness. – Jordan R. (full review)

Where to Stream: Amazon, iTunes, Google

The Zookeeper’s Wife (Niki Caro)

The Zookeeper’s Wife begins with those five famous words that hold the power to either become a film’s dependency (and therefore downfall) or its empowering catalyst, laying the foundation to convey a poignant tale: “Based on a true story.” Fortunately, The Zookeeper’s Wife sticks with the latter, and the true tale being told is one for the ages. Niki Caro‘s drama follows a couple who hide Jews in their zoo and use it as a point of passage and escape during the Nazi takeover of Warsaw. The narrative is a simple one, allowing The Zookeeper’s Wife to shine in its performances, imagery, and storytelling, which it pristinely accomplishes. – Chelsey G. (full review)

Where to Stream: Amazon, iTunes, Google

Also New to Streaming

Amazon

Night School (review)

FilmStruck

Rodeo and The Moment of Truth

Who Are You, Polly Maggoo? and Quadrophenia

An Actor’s Revenge

Her Brother

Conflagration

The Woman in Question

The Importance of Being Earnest

Mubi (free 30-day trial)

Paris Frills

The Train to Moscow: A Journey to Utopia

Lost in Lebanon

Being 14

Molly’s Theory of Relativity

Le Moulin

Netflix

The Stanford Prison Experiment (review)

Discover more titles that are now available to stream.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Paterson,’ ‘Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,’ ‘Three,’ and More

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Paterson (Jim Jarmusch)

Jim Jarmusch proved he was back in a major way with Only Lovers Left Alive a few years ago, and the streak continues with Paterson, a calm, introspective drama with such positive views on marriage and creativity that I was left floored. In following the cyclical life of Adam Driver‘s Paterson, a bus driver in Paterson, New Jersey, who also has dreams of being a poet, Jarmusch superbly shows that one’s own life
See full article at The Film Stage »

New to Streaming: ‘Paterson,’ ‘Julieta,’ ‘Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Evolution (Lucile Hadžihalilovic)

Near the beginning of Evolution, there’s a shot that hangs underwater, showing a seemingly harmonious aquatic eco-system that’s glimpsed just long enough to create the sense of something that, while somewhat familiar, is distinctly outside the human world. This fleeting image though shows the promise of the film Evolution could’ve been. – Ethan V. (full review)

Where to Stream: Netflix

Fire at Sea and
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Transfiguration Review [SXSW 2017]

The Transfiguration is not your average vampire coming-of-age tale (what is, really?). This ain’t Twilight – it’s “realistic,” in the words of main character Milo. Filmmaker Michael O’Shea shoots a portrait piece of urban New York City through the eyes of a blood-sucking teen, who’s also navigating an adolescent interracial relationship. There’s so much going on – gang aversion, racism, early signs of serial killings, suicide, Ptsd – but a young boy’s maturation always remains paramount to story. O’Shea asks a lot of his audience, and in return, bares so much of his film’s morbidly curious soul. It’s hard being a kid in NYC. Even harder when your idol is Nosferatu.

Eric Ruffin stars as Milo, a child who has no guidance after his mother’s decision to exit our world. Brother Lewis (Aaron Moten) spends day and night glued to their living room couch,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

New Teaser Trailer for Bong Joon-ho’s Okja Hints at the “Animal in All of Us”

  • DailyDead
"I took nature and science, and I synthesized." Since 2013's Snowpiercer, we've been eagerly awaiting Okja, the next film from Bong Joon-ho, and ahead of its premiere this June on Netflix, the first teaser trailer for the movie has been unveiled.

"From visionary Director Bong Joon Ho, this grand global adventure follows a friendship too big to ignore. Meet Mija, a young girl who risks everything to prevent a powerful, multi-national company from kidnapping her best friend – a massive animal named Okja. Following her across continents, the coming-of-age comedy drama sees Mija’s horizons expand in a way one never would want for one’s children, coming up against the harsh realities of genetically modified food experimentation, globalization, eco-terrorism, and humanity’s obsession with image, brand and self-promotion."

Okja reteams Joon-ho with Snowpiercer co-star Tilda Swinton (Only Lovers Left Alive) and also features Jake Gyllenhaal (Life), Paul Dano (Swiss Army Man
See full article at DailyDead »

Kneejerk Reactions To The Oscar Nominations And The Final Word On 2017

Even when you live in Los Angeles, as I do, if you’re not in the network of critics groups and press screening and screener DVDs it can be a challenge to keep up with everything you tell yourself you have to see before attempting an informed roundup of the year currently in the rearview mirror. And I also try to not let more than a couple of weeks of the new year go by before checking in, regardless of how many of the year’s big presents I have left to unwrap, though in past years I have not lived well by this dictum—let’s just say that if I’m still posting stuff on the year’s best after even Oscar has thoroughly chewed over the goods, as has happened in the past, well, I’ve overstayed my welcome.

2016 was, in most ways, a disaster of a year,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Remembering John Hurt by Anne-Katrin Titze

Atom Egoyan on John Hurt in Samuel Beckett’s Krapp’s Last Tape: "I had the great privilege to work with this astonishing actor."

Sir John Hurt, who died this morning on January 28, 2017, was given the honor Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 2004. In 2012, he received a BAFTA Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema Award. Hurt won a Best Actor BAFTA for David Lynch's The Elephant Man, produced by Mel Brooks, and a Best Supporting Actor for Alan Parker's Midnight Express, screenplay by Oliver Stone.

When John Hurt was in New York for Bong Joon-ho's Snowpiercer, we also discussed his work with John Huston, Fred Zinnemann, Richard Fleischer, Jim Jarmusch's Only Lovers Left Alive, the triad with Lars von Trier - Dogville - Manderlay - Melancholia, and the genius of Bertolt Brecht.

John Hurt in New York Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

John Hurt is Neville
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

NYC Weekend Watch: Spielberg, Rohmer, ‘Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence,’ ‘The Keep’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Three Spielberg pictures screen this weekend, while Rohmer is highlighted with Pauline at the Beach and Full Moon in Paris on Friday.

A Rocky-Creed mini-series run on Friday and Saturday.

The Rules of the Game shows this Sunday.

Japan Society

One of David Bowie‘s greatest performances is on display in Nagisa Oshima‘s Merry Christmas,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Rappers and Filmmakers Hamé and Ekoué on How ‘Paris Prestige’ Shows People ‘in Their Complexity’

Rappers and Filmmakers Hamé and Ekoué on How ‘Paris Prestige’ Shows People ‘in Their Complexity’
Starring Reda Kateb, whose “Django” opens Berlin, Slimane Dazi (“Only Lovers Left Alive”) and Mélanie Laurent (“Inglourious Basterds”), “Paris Prestige” marks the awaited feature debut of Mohamed Bourokba and Ekoué Labitey, two of France’s best known rappers who as Hamé and Eboué leapt to wider fame when Hamé was (unsuccessfully) sued for libel by Nicolas Sarkozy in a case that ran for eight years from 2002.

Produced by Hamé and Ekoué, “Paris Prestige” packs prestige partners: Haut et Court, which produced Cannes Palme d’Or winner “The Class” and the French original TV series “The Returned,” co-produces and distributes in France, bowing the film on Feb. 22; Memento Films International, which sold “The Class,” Asghar Farhadi’s films and “Winter Sleep,” another Palme d’Or winner, handles international sales.

Hamé and Ekoué are no rookies. Hamé studied cinema at the Tisch School of the arts at New York University, and with
See full article at Variety - Film News »

In memoriam: the film stars and directors we lost in 2016

In memoriam: the film stars and directors we lost in 2016
We pay tribute to the film stars and directors from around the world who sadly passed away in 2016.Hector BabencoArgentine-born Brazilian director Hector Babenco died on July 13 at 70-years-old.He found international success with Brazilian slum drama Pixote (1981), going on to make Kiss Of

We pay tribute to the film stars and directors from around the world who sadly passed away in 2016.

Hector Babenco

Argentine-born Brazilian director Hector Babenco died on July 13 at 70-years-old.

He found international success with Brazilian slum drama Pixote (1981), going on to make Kiss Of The Spider Woman (1985), for which he earned a best director Oscar nominee and William Hurt earned an Oscar win for best actor.

Babenco went on to direct Meryl Streep and Jack Nicholson in Ironweed (1987) and Tom Berenger and John Lithgow in At Play In The Fields Of The Lord (1991).

After undergoing cancer treatment in the 1990s, he returned to the director’s chair for films including Brazilian prison
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Navigating Through Bermuda: A Conversation with Jim Jarmusch

  • MUBI
Jim Jarmusch. Photo courtesy of the Lisbon Estoril Film Festival.This interview took place on an auspicious morning after the U.S. elections. The setting was placid: an oceanside terrace in the small casino town of Estoril, twenty minutes outside of Lisbon, where Jim Jarmusch was attending Paulo Branco’s Lisbon Estoril Film Festival. Despite the harrowing mood, the subject was focused and insightful, talking about his working method, collaborators, and the poetic influences and resonances for his latest film, Paterson, which opens in North America this week.Notebook: I wanted to start by talking about technical matters.Jim Jarmusch: Sure.Notebook: I’m curious…do you use a shot list?Jarmusch: No. Because, say, we go to the location, and it’s 4pm, and we’re shooting the next day at 9am… and now the light is coming from a different place, and maybe it rained overnight, and everything’s different.
See full article at MUBI »
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