Only Lovers Left Alive
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

6 items from 2017


The Transfiguration Review [SXSW 2017]

12 March 2017 2:47 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

The Transfiguration is not your average vampire coming-of-age tale (what is, really?). This ain’t Twilight – it’s “realistic,” in the words of main character Milo. Filmmaker Michael O’Shea shoots a portrait piece of urban New York City through the eyes of a blood-sucking teen, who’s also navigating an adolescent interracial relationship. There’s so much going on – gang aversion, racism, early signs of serial killings, suicide, Ptsd – but a young boy’s maturation always remains paramount to story. O’Shea asks a lot of his audience, and in return, bares so much of his film’s morbidly curious soul. It’s hard being a kid in NYC. Even harder when your idol is Nosferatu.

Eric Ruffin stars as Milo, a child who has no guidance after his mother’s decision to exit our world. Brother Lewis (Aaron Moten) spends day and night glued to their living room couch, »

- Matt Donato

Permalink | Report a problem


New Teaser Trailer for Bong Joon-ho’s Okja Hints at the “Animal in All of Us”

28 February 2017 7:13 AM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

"I took nature and science, and I synthesized." Since 2013's Snowpiercer, we've been eagerly awaiting Okja, the next film from Bong Joon-ho, and ahead of its premiere this June on Netflix, the first teaser trailer for the movie has been unveiled.

"From visionary Director Bong Joon Ho, this grand global adventure follows a friendship too big to ignore. Meet Mija, a young girl who risks everything to prevent a powerful, multi-national company from kidnapping her best friend – a massive animal named Okja. Following her across continents, the coming-of-age comedy drama sees Mija’s horizons expand in a way one never would want for one’s children, coming up against the harsh realities of genetically modified food experimentation, globalization, eco-terrorism, and humanity’s obsession with image, brand and self-promotion."

Okja reteams Joon-ho with Snowpiercer co-star Tilda Swinton (Only Lovers Left Alive) and also features Jake Gyllenhaal (Life), Paul Dano (Swiss Army Man »

- Derek Anderson

Permalink | Report a problem


Kneejerk Reactions To The Oscar Nominations And The Final Word On 2017

29 January 2017 11:01 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Even when you live in Los Angeles, as I do, if you’re not in the network of critics groups and press screening and screener DVDs it can be a challenge to keep up with everything you tell yourself you have to see before attempting an informed roundup of the year currently in the rearview mirror. And I also try to not let more than a couple of weeks of the new year go by before checking in, regardless of how many of the year’s big presents I have left to unwrap, though in past years I have not lived well by this dictum—let’s just say that if I’m still posting stuff on the year’s best after even Oscar has thoroughly chewed over the goods, as has happened in the past, well, I’ve overstayed my welcome.

2016 was, in most ways, a disaster of a year, »

- Dennis Cozzalio

Permalink | Report a problem


Remembering John Hurt by Anne-Katrin Titze

28 January 2017 12:38 PM, PST | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Atom Egoyan on John Hurt in Samuel Beckett’s Krapp’s Last Tape: "I had the great privilege to work with this astonishing actor."

Sir John Hurt, who died this morning on January 28, 2017, was given the honor Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 2004. In 2012, he received a BAFTA Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema Award. Hurt won a Best Actor BAFTA for David Lynch's The Elephant Man, produced by Mel Brooks, and a Best Supporting Actor for Alan Parker's Midnight Express, screenplay by Oliver Stone.

When John Hurt was in New York for Bong Joon-ho's Snowpiercer, we also discussed his work with John Huston, Fred Zinnemann, Richard Fleischer, Jim Jarmusch's Only Lovers Left Alive, the triad with Lars von Trier - Dogville - Manderlay - Melancholia, and the genius of Bertolt Brecht.

John Hurt in New York Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

John Hurt is Neville »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

Permalink | Report a problem


NYC Weekend Watch: Spielberg, Rohmer, ‘Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence,’ ‘The Keep’ & More

13 January 2017 8:37 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Three Spielberg pictures screen this weekend, while Rohmer is highlighted with Pauline at the Beach and Full Moon in Paris on Friday.

A Rocky-Creed mini-series run on Friday and Saturday.

The Rules of the Game shows this Sunday.

Japan Society

One of David Bowie‘s greatest performances is on display in Nagisa Oshima‘s Merry Christmas, »

- Nick Newman

Permalink | Report a problem


Rappers and Filmmakers Hamé and Ekoué on How ‘Paris Prestige’ Shows People ‘in Their Complexity’

10 January 2017 12:36 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Starring Reda Kateb, whose “Django” opens Berlin, Slimane Dazi (“Only Lovers Left Alive”) and Mélanie Laurent (“Inglourious Basterds”), “Paris Prestige” marks the awaited feature debut of Mohamed Bourokba and Ekoué Labitey, two of France’s best known rappers who as Hamé and Eboué leapt to wider fame when Hamé was (unsuccessfully) sued for libel by Nicolas Sarkozy in a case that ran for eight years from 2002.

Produced by Hamé and Ekoué, “Paris Prestige” packs prestige partners: Haut et Court, which produced Cannes Palme d’Or winner “The Class” and the French original TV series “The Returned,” co-produces and distributes in France, bowing the film on Feb. 22; Memento Films International, which sold “The Class,” Asghar Farhadi’s films and “Winter Sleep,” another Palme d’Or winner, handles international sales.

Hamé and Ekoué are no rookies. Hamé studied cinema at the Tisch School of the arts at New York University, and with »

- John Hopewell

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

6 items from 2017


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners