Midnight's Children (2012) - News Poster

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Darsheel Safary has grown up to be a handsome teenager and set to make a comeback with a love story Quickie

Remember the cute 8-year-old dyslexic boy Ishaan Nandkishore Awasthi aka Darsheel Safary from Aamir Khan's superhit 2007 film Taare Zameen Par? Well the little one has now grown up to be a handsome teenager, and what's more, he will soon be coming on the big screen with his upcoming film Quickie, which is a teenage love story. The movie will be directed by Pradip Atluri and is being produced by producers Tony D'Souza, Amul Vikas Mohan and Nitin Upadhyaya. Taran Adarsh took to Twitter to share the teaser poster of Darsheel's upcoming film and the teenager is very excited to begin his second innings in Bollywood. And after looking at his recent picture, you just can't roll your eyes off his handsome looks. Sporting a spiked hairo and a goatee, Darsheel looked baffled, probably while figuring out a way to deal with the dilemmas of teenage life and understanding love
See full article at FilmiPop »

Beeba Boys: Watch An Exclusive Clip From Deepa Mehta's Gangster Film

Deepa Mehta - the Oscar nominated director of Water and Midnight's Children - takes a turn into very different territory with her upcoming Beeba Boys, an often violent look at crime within the Indian community on Canada's west coast.Deepa Mehta mixes guns, bhangra beats, bespoke suits, cocaine and betrayal in Beeba Boys: an adrenaline-charged Indo-Canadian gang war, and a violent clash of culture and crime. Gang leader Jeet Johar and his young, loyal, and often-brutal crew dress like peacocks, love attention and openly compete with an old-style Indo crime syndicate to take over the Vancouver drug and arms scene. Blood is spilled, hearts are broken and family bonds shattered as the Beeba Boys ("nice boys") do anything "to be seen and to be feared" in...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

UK TV ratings: Doctor Who falls to 3.7 million, as Rugby World Cup dominates with 8.4 million

UK TV ratings round-up - data supplied by Barb

Doctor Who fell to below 4 million viewers on BBC One last night, according to overnight data.

Facing competition from the Rugby World Cup on ITV (8.41 million/38.3%), 'The Witch's Familiar' appealed to an audience of 3.71 million (16.6%) from 7.45pm.

Strictly Come Dancing earlier averaged 7.66 million (39.7%) from 6.15pm.

Later on, The National Lottery: In It to Win It and Casualty were watched by 3.03 million (13.4%) and 3.8 million (17.4%) respectively.

On BBC Two, a Dad's Army repeat entertained 1.6 million (7.3%), and Midnight's Children logged 705k (3.2%) from 8.15pm.

Over on Channel 4, Paddy McGuinness's Celebrity Benchmark began with 546k (2.7%) in the 7pm hour, before Snow White and the Huntsman averaged 912k (4.1%).

Channel 5's Now That's Funny! amused 734k (3.2%) from 8pm, and Football League Tonight continued with 309k (1.4%).
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Colin Brown a Guest Speaker at Tiff

As part of Tiff, New York-based Film Consultant Colin Brown, Managing Partner and Director of International Operations at MADSolutions, has been one of the guest speakers at the 10th anniversary edition of the International Financing Forum (Iff), the annual co-financing event that took place on September 13th.

Moderated by Matt Mueller, editor of Screen International, Colin discussed the art and science of film financing and project packaging in a staged discussion with Lianne Halfon, the celebrated producer who teamed up with actor-director John Malkovich and producer Russell Smith to create Mr. Mudd, the production company behind such films as "Ghost World," "Juno," "The Perks Of Being A Wallflower," "Labor Day" and "Young Adult." The event also has been attended by Film Analyst Alaa Karkouti, CEO of Mad Solutions.

"If cinema is in the business of manufacturing delight, then to what degree can that process be quantified? That is one of the key questions that we be examining at a time when data analytics is finally coming to film financing and project packaging in an attempt to assist - and accelerate - the process by which producers bring their ideas in front of receptive investors and industry gatekeepers," explained Colin. "We want to explore the degree to which technology really can solve some of the Catch 22 situations that producers find with regard to securing cast and financing."

Iff is a two-day event that includes one-on-one meetings, an industry panel discussion, roundtable meetings and producers' networking receptions. Selected international and Canadian producers are brought together with international sales agents, distributors, funders, agents and executive producers to do business in brokered meetings and benefit from exclusive networking opportunities. Now celebrating its 10th year, Iff has introduced hundreds of projects to the international marketplace with over 60 successfully financed to date, including Deepa Mehta's "Midnight's Children," Denis Villineuve's "Incendies," David Michôd's "Animal Kingdom," Ralph Fiennes' directorial debut "Coriolanus" and Haiffa Al-Mansour's "Wadjda," among many others.

In addition to his association with Mad, Colin is currently the Editorial Director of Slated, the pioneering film financing and networking website headquartered in Los Angeles. He also teaches at New York University, at both its renowned film school, the Tisch School of the Arts, and at the SternSchool of Business. He is a faculty board member of Nyu's Cinema Research Institute, an initiative designed to support and mentor innovative new business models for filmmaking.

During his career as a film and business journalist - most notably as the longstanding Editor-in-Chief of Screen International -Colin won numerous awards. As a film critic, he has served on the juries of numerous prestigious film festival juries including the Sundance Film Festival.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

More trouble for turbaned heroes

More trouble for turbaned heroes
Tiger Shroff who's playing a Sikh super-hero in Remo D'Souza's The Flying Jat would have to be extremely cautious about the dos and don'ts. Sikh cultural and religious organizations are up in arms against Prabhu Dheva's Singh Is Bliing for Akshay Kumar's various stunts and antics, all done in a spirit of fun and games. Now in Deepa Mehta's Beeba Boys about a bunch of Punjabi gangsters there are situations involving Sikh characters that are bound to make the moral custodians of the Sikh community extremely unhappy. Says a source, "In Beeba Boys we see a Sikh character using his holy kirpan (knife) to slash and murder a victim. The shot was removed from the trailer. But the scene is very much there in the film. There is bound to be trouble in India for this." Deepa Mehta is no stranger to controversies. Her Fire about a
See full article at BollywoodHungama »

'The D-Train' Cinematographer Giles Nuttgens on Trying to Get the 'Film Look' Digitally

  • Indiewire
'The D-Train' Cinematographer Giles Nuttgens on Trying to Get the 'Film Look' Digitally
[Editor's Note: This post is presented in partnership with Time Warner Cable Movies On Demand in support of Indie Film Month. Today's pick, "The D-Train," is available now On Demand.]  Giles Nuttgens, the British cinematographer best known for his collaborations with Deepa Mehta ("Fire," "Earth," "Water," "Midnight's Children") as well as Scott McGehee and David Siegel ("The Deep End," "Bee Season," "What Maisie Knew") had two indie films out in 2014, both of which debuted at last year's Sundance Film Festival: Stuart Murdoch's musical "God Help the Girl" and Jake Paltrow's dystopian "Young Ones." His latest project couldn't be more different. Written and directed by Jarrad Paul and Andrew Mogel, "The D-Train," which premiered at this year's Sundance Film Festival, is a dark dramedy starring Jack Black and James Marsden. Read More: Jack Black...
See full article at Indiewire »

Tomorrow We Disappear: Watch Amazing Puppetry Skills In Exclusive Clip

A documentary about an artist colony in New Delhi is coming to online platforms tomorrow thanks to distributor Bond 360 Films. Twitch has been given an exclusive clip to share with you from the film. Witness some crazy good puppetry skills from puppeteer Puran Bhatt.Tomorrow We Disappear chronicles the last days of Kathputli, the mysterious hand-built artist colony featured in Salman Rushdie's iconic Midnight's Children. Hidden in the alleyways of New Delhi, a community of magicians, acrobats and puppeteers approach their looming eviction to make way for a modern skyscraper. Bound together by tradition and impending gentrification, this captivating film allows us to experience a culture's magic and wonder before it's gone.  Directed by Jimmy Goldblum and Adam Weber Tomorrow We Disappear will be available on...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Deepa Mehta's Beeba Boys debut in world premiere of poster

Deepa Mehta, one of our country’s most celebrated and well-regarded filmmakers, steps into an entirely new genre in her latest cinematic venture, Beeba Boys. We never would’ve expected the director of Water and Midnight's Children to take up purchase in the crime genre, but we couldn’t be more excited to see Deepa directing well-dressed gunslingers making terrible life choices.

Beeba Boys follows Jeet Johar (Randeep Hooda), a guarded, ruthless gangster within the very real criminal underground populated by second- and third-generation Indian immigants on Canada’s west coast. As Jeet competes with rival gangs for an increasingly shrinking turf, the single father and dutiful son is forced to violently demand respect, ensuring the Beeba Boys’ continued survival in Vancouver.

Deepa Mehta’s Beeba Boys, which hits theatres October 16, also stars Waris Ahluwalia (The Darjeeling Limited, The Grand Budapest Hotel), Paul Gross (this year’s Hyena Road), Sarah Allen,
See full article at Cineplex »

'The D-Train' Cinematographer Giles Nuttgens on Trying to Get the 'Film Look' Digitally

'The D-Train' Cinematographer Giles Nuttgens on Trying to Get the 'Film Look' Digitally
Giles Nuttgens, the British cinematographer best known for his collaborations with Deepa Mehta ("Fire," "Earth," "Water," "Midnight's Children") as well as Scott McGehee and David Siegel ("The Deep End," "Bee Season," "What Maisie Knew") had two indie films out in 2014, both of which debuted at last year's Sundance Film Festival: Stuart Murdoch's musical "God Help the Girl" and Jake Paltrow's dystopian "Young Ones." His latest project couldn't be more different. Written and directed by Jarrad Paul and Andrew Mogel, "The D-Train," which premiered at this year's Sundance Film Festival, is a dark dramedy starring Jack Black and James Marsden. Read More: Jack Black and James Marsden Saved Their 'D-Train' Sex Scene for Last Indiewire talked to Nuttgens late last year about "God Help the Girl" and "Young Ones" and followed up with him again recently to discuss the...
See full article at Indiewire »

Check Out The Teaser For Enakkul Oruvan Featuring Siddharth

Last year Kannada filmmaker Pawan Kumar made a huge splash in the Indian independent feature world by successfully crowdfunding his second feature film, Lucia. The film made a big impression on the international festival circuit, and is commonly recognized as one of the finest Indian films of 2013. Now, the film has been remade in Tamil for an even larger audience as Enakkul Oruvan, starring the now ubiquitous Siddharth (Jigarthanda, Ko, Rang De Basanti, Midnight's Children), the rare Indian film star who moves fluidly between regional cinemas with very little problem.Lucia was the story of an insomniac projectionist who, in his desperation to find rest, comes across a drug guaranteed to help him sleep. However, he very quickly realizes that the effects of the drug...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Randeep Hooda plays gangster Bindy Johal in Deepa Mehtas film

Randeep Hooda plays gangster Bindy Johal in Deepa Mehtas film
The prolific Deepa Mehta has done it again! Made a film that is likely to provoke extreme responses. In the year 2000, Deepa Mehta had started Water in Varanasi which had to be stalled when religious fundamentalists objected to the film. Deepa's Fire and Midnight's Children were also controversial works of art. Now in the film titled Beeba Boys, Deepa has shot the life of the dreaded Indo-Canadian criminal Bindy Johal who was brutally gunned down in 1998. Bindy, a heroic legend among the Indians in Canada, is considered an extremely controversial figure. Hero for some, a sociopath for others, it would be interesting to see how Deepa Mehta has interpreted the character's dark and criminal life. Bindy's band of Punjabi bad boys has also been featured in the film. Randeep Hooda who plays Bindy Johal spent weeks studying Johal's life and crimes and why he was considered a criminal by many
See full article at BollywoodHungama »

Isa of the Day: Abhi Rastogi of 108 Media

Our International Sales Agent (Isa) of the Day coverage is back again for this year's Cannes Film Festival. We will feature successful, upcoming, innovative and trailblazing agents from around the world, and cover the latest trends in sales and distribution. Beyond the numbers and deals, this segment will also share inspirational and unique stories of how these individuals have evolved and paved their way in the industry, and what they envision for the new waves in global cinema.

108 Media is a new sales company out of Toronto. Founder Abhi Rastogi sees it as "a force that opposes the standards of the film industry, redefining boundaries of what is possible and achievable." 108 Media recently acquired the worldwide sales rights for The Insect King by Priscilla Cameron and will begin selling the picture at the Cannes Film Festival. 108 is also excited to bring titles like He Never Died, which stars Henry Rollins as a punk rocker cannibal and Camera Trap, a wildlife thriller about a film crew that pursues local sightings of a rare wildcat in Nepal.

Abhi Rastogi shares some of his history, sales and more about 108's Cannes lineup:

How did you start 108 Media?

I started the company two years ago. We looked at how sales and distribution was done for the last seven or eight years, and we looked at bringing something different to the independent marketplace. And so we've tried to stick to a certain model where you can expect not so regular things.

We are doing theatrical releases in North America. We've released seven films theatrically in the last one and a half years--some of the most high profile films being Midnight's Children, based on Salman Rushdie's book, The We And The I, based on Michel Gondry. We also act as a foreign sales company, so we're very excited to introduce new projects and new voices to the international market.

What's your background?

Prior to this, I was a managing director of a company called Cinesavvy. We produced films like Frankie & Alice, starring Halle Berry; I was an executive producer on the film. Lionsgate released it last month. Prior to that, I was a distribution manager at Cinemavault, which is a Toronto based sales company.

What will 108 bring to Cannes?

We're bringing first footage from the film He Never Died, which stars Henry Rollins as a punk rocker and a cannibal who never died. This was a film that I was introduced to in September. And as a sales agent, you also get involved with packaging a lot; we were able to package the film right after Tiff in record time. We shot the film in November, so we're bringing it to Cannes.

Then we're brining this amazing, stunning chiller that was made in Nepal called Camera Trap, produced by the very high profile Steve Christian of Pinewood Pictures from the UK. It was shot all on location in Nepal last year. It's about a crew that goes to look for a snow leopard and finds something else. What's amazing is that the filmmakers have done a lot of nature related visuals. The film is stunning, visually captivating, and very realistic.

How are sales?

The sales are doing very well, because we're realistic about what the market can bare. We want to bring exciting projects, but at the same time, we are very careful of what we are requesting from our buyers and what's needed on their parts to support these films. It's more about collaboration for us. We tend to do a lot of business with the same buyers.

Some territories are more challenging than others, but that's the nature of our business. Spain is challenging--there are fewer buyers that are chasing after much higher profile content. That's because there are just not enough outlets for independent films to be released there. France has been a bit more challenging because of the home video markets collapsing there.

At the same time, we're doing very well in Asia through our Tokyo office. We tend to sell well across the board, including Germany, the UK and Italy.

More about 108 Media:

Cannes Lineup:

Camera Trap

Honour

Replace

He Never Died

Case of Kyoto, Case of Schuichi

The Time Being

Fugly

Fanie Fourie’s Lobola

Shame The Devil

The Rescuers

Tough Bond

Overview

108 is an agitator – a force that opposes the standards of the film industry, redefining boundaries of what is possible and achievable.

The media industry is not what it used to be, it is untraditional and media is consumed differently, in an ever changing and increasingly diversified forms of delivery and interaction. 108 Media is as unpredictable, leading edge and flexible as today's media demands – we’re targeted, we’re quick to execute, and we give the audience what they want, where they want it, and when they want it!

The Why is the easy part, because it is required of a media company to do so or be left behind like print media. The How is the interesting part. 108 Media measures social, blog and web traffic and consumer patterns to fully understand its consumers' dynamics, location and tendencies, thereby building effective and timely strategies to maximize media exposure and consumption efficiency. Further, 108 Media controls the pipelines of delivery, creating a truly vertically integrated next-generation media company fully capable to producing, marketing, and distributing media to all major Digital VOD, Broadband VOD and Paid Cable platforms.

We cut the old mantras of advertising and media delivery and enable a truly cross-promotional and cross platform digital experience.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Half of a Yellow Sun review – 'Well-intentioned and heartfelt'

This adaptation of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's novel, though often sluggish, is a valuable reminder of Britain's toxic post-imperial legacy

Some of Britain's notable "postcolonial" fiction has translated uneasily into cinema: Monica Ali's Brick Lane and Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children didn't entirely work as movies. Zadie Smith's White Teeth was adapted, with more success, as a television drama. Now comes the film of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's 2006 novel Half of a Yellow Sun, about lives in Nigeria torn apart by the 1960s Biafran war: the attempt to create a secessionist state whose flag showed the top half of a hopeful rising (not setting) sun. Adapted and directed by Biyi Bandele, the film is well intentioned and certainly very well cast: Thandie Newton is the elegant intellectual Olanna and Chiwetel Ejiofor her husband, the conceited, bullish academic Odenigbo. Their tempestuous private lives are made even more tumultuous by the history being made around them.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Half of a Yellow Sun review – 'Well-intentioned and heartfelt'

This adaptation of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's novel, though often sluggish, is a valuable reminder of Britain's toxic post-imperial legacy

Some of Britain's notable "postcolonial" fiction has translated uneasily into cinema: Monica Ali's Brick Lane and Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children didn't entirely work as movies. Zadie Smith's White Teeth was adapted, with more success, as a television drama. Now comes the film of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's 2006 novel Half of a Yellow Sun, about lives in Nigeria torn apart by the 1960s Biafran war: the attempt to create a secessionist state whose flag showed the top half of a hopeful rising (not setting) sun. Adapted and directed by Biyi Bandele, the film is well intentioned and certainly very well cast: Thandie Newton is the elegant intellectual Olanna and Chiwetel Ejiofor her husband, the conceited, bullish academic Odenigbo. Their tempestuous private lives are made even more tumultuous by the history being made around them.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Hanif Kureishi interview: 'Every 10 years you become someone else'

Hanif Kureishi's muse has long been transgression: dazzling early success was followed by a sex-and-drugs phase, family falling-out and a lacerating novel about marital breakdown. Now, with The Last Word, has he finally pinned down who he really is?

The first time I met Hanif Kureishi it was the mid-80s, and we talked about writing fiction for Faber and Faber whose list I was directing. Kureishi came into my office like a rock star and I remember thinking that he did not seem in need of a career move. He was already riding high on the international success of his screenplay, My Beautiful Laundrette.

In fact, Kureishi was cannily pondering his next step. He was on the lookout for a means of self-expression that might sustain a way of life and over which he could have some control. Movies, he said, were chancy, a gold-rush business. There was
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Fresh Meat's Zawe Ashton, Aka Vod, is the coolest thing on TV right now

The plain-speaking, adventurously dressed star of Channel 4's student sitcom is bulldozing through barriers for black women on screen

Television's coolest characters often come with a signature "thing". The Fonz from Happy Days had his leather jacket and his thumbs. Master William from The Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air had his hi-top fade and loud trousers. In the Channel 4 comedy Fresh Meat, Vod has her off-the-wall clothes and that withering gaze that cuts down foolishness at 20 paces. She's easily the coolest character on television at the moment, but when I tell that to the woman who plays her, the response is charmingly modest. "I would really like to keep anyone who says that in my pocket, as I go about my daily life," says Zawe Ashton (the Zawe is pronounced like "Bowie"). "When I hit a low point, I'd just ask, 'What's that you're saying in there? I'm the coolest person on TV?
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Review: Midnight's Children

Midnight's Children is based on a novel by Salman Rushdie, who also narrated, wrote the screenplay and executive produced this film by Deepa Mehta. Canadian director Mehta is known for her emotional elements trilogy (Earth, Fire and Water) depicting the lives of women in her native India. This new film aspires to be epic in scope, and lacks the intimacy and depth of her earlier works.

The movie's title refers to the children who were born at the stroke of midnight on the date of partition in 1947, when Pakistan and India split. Because of their auspicious birthdate, these kids have powers which cannot be understood by others. The story is told by Saleem (played in the last hour by Satya Bhabha, New Girl) -- from the first meeting of his grandparents in 1917 Kashmir through India's 30th anniversary in 1977. 

read more
See full article at Slackerwood »

Cannes film festival 2013: Like Father, Like Son - first look review

Hirokazu Kore-eda's baby-swap film is another good-natured domestic drama set in contemporary Japan, but it lacks the nuance and innovation of his earlier work

Hirokazu Kore-eda has returned to Cannes with another gentle and warm-hearted family drama in that classic Japanese manner that he has been gravitating towards in recent movies like Still Walking (2008) and I Wish (2011). It is a very decent piece of work, although not as distinctive as those two previous movies, not quite as finely observed and frankly a little schematic and formulaic, with life-lessons being learnt by the obvious people. It does however have charm and abundant human sympathy.

Like Father, Like Son is a "baby-swap" drama: go-getting salaryman Ryota (Masaharu Fukuyama) and his sleek wife Midori (Machiko Ono) live in a perfect modern house and have a little 6-year-old boy — their only child — whom they push hard educationally. Then the hospital sends the devastating
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Deepa Mehta To Adapt "Secret Daughter"

Canadian director Deepa Mehta ("Midnight's Children") is set to helm an adaptation of Shilpi Somaya Gowda's novel "Secret Daughter" at Silent Joe Inc. and Mongrel Media.

The story follows two families, one in Mumbai forced to give a baby up for adoption, and another in San Francisco raising a brown-skinned child from another culture.

Mehta is penning the script, while Jody Colero and Hussain Amarshi will produce.

Source: THR
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Which literary novels should daredevil film directors adapt next? | John Dugdale

The same daredevil spirit that has informed many an apparently insane film or TV version over the past decade has seen adaptations of literary novels

When the Cannes film festival starts next week, William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, adapted and directed by James Franco, will be in the lineup. The Spider-Man star is known for mixing bookish projects with acting in blockbusters, but has nevertheless raised eyebrows by selecting a novel with 15 narrators that tells the seemingly uncinegenic story of a southern matriarch's death and burial.

This month will also see Paul Thomas Anderson begin to shoot his version of Thomas Pynchon's Inherent Vice, the first of Pynchon's dauntingly complex works to be filmed; and Steven Soderbergh recently announced plans for a 12-hour TV dramatisation of John Barth's The Sot-Weed Factor ("If it works, it'll be super-cool. And if it doesn't, you won't be able to
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
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