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Snowpiercer (2013)

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Set in a future where a failed climate-change experiment kills all life on the planet except for a lucky few who boarded the Snowpiercer, a train that travels around the globe, where a class system emerges.

Director:

(as Bong Joon Ho)

Writers:

(screenplay) (as Joon Ho Bong), (screenplay) | 4 more credits »
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Popularity
1,056 ( 432)
33 wins & 103 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Namgoong Minsoo (as Song Kang Ho)
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Yona (as Ko Asung)
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Emma Levie ...
Claude
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Fuyu (as Stephen Park)
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Storyline

Set in 2031, the entire world is frozen except for those aboard the Snowpiercer. For 17 years, the world's survivors are on a train hurtling around the globe creating their own economy and class system. Led by Curtis, a group of lower-class citizens living in squalor at the back of the train are determined to get to the front of the train and spread the wealth around. Each section of the train holds new surprises for the group who have to battle their way through. A revolution is underway. Written by Anne Campbell

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

We move forward See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence, language and drug content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

| |  »

Language:

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Release Date:

11 July 2014 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Expresso do Amanhã  »

Box Office

Budget:

$39,200,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$14,842,419 (South Korea) (1 August 2013)

Gross:

$4,563,650 (USA) (31 October 2014)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Bong Joon-ho says he got the idea from a 1970s nuclear-powered submarine. The train and nuclear-powered submarine in the 1970s had a similar average speed of fifty kilometers (thirty-one miles) per hour. See more »

Goofs

During the scene of the shootout across the gap between Curtis and Franco the Elder, the last shots they take at each other are not only stopped by the intended target's window, they actually become stuck said windows. Curtis' firearm is a submachine gun, using pistol cartridges (probably 9mm), while Franco's is an assault rifle, most likely using NATO 5.56 (or .223 civilian version) rifle cartridges. Therefor, Curtis' shot probably wouldn't even have made it across the gap to hit Franco's window (nor during the preceding shots), while Franco's shot would have certainly penetrated Curtis' window and hit him. Pistol cartridges have a very short range and much lower power and velocity in comparison to rifle cartridges. Even further, Franco would have had to be an extremely good shot to gauge the lead needed to accurately target Curtis because of the moving target, and it's doubtful that they had regular target practice sessions on the train, let alone targeting moving objects. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Male Reporter: Good morning. On this day, July 1st, 2014, at this hour, 0600, we are at the first airport in the world...
Female Reporter: The topic of so much controversy over the past seven years has continued development. Protests from environmental groups and a number of developing countries continue. But in accordance with...
Male Reporter: It had been claimed that CW7 is the answer to global warning. And we are witnessing it...
Female Reporter: Leaders argue that global warming can no longer be ignored. Today, 79 countries will begin ...
[...]
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Soundtracks

Midnight the Stars and You
Original Writers: Jimmy Campbell (as James Campbell), Harry M. Woods (as Harry Woods) and Reginald Connelly
Original Publisher: Campbell Connelly and Co Ltd.
Sub Publisher: Music Cube, Inc.
Performed by Ray Noble and His Orchestra
Courtesy of EMI Records Ltd.
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User Reviews

 
Metropolis of the new century
3 November 2013 | by (France) – See all my reviews

No spoilers here !

Remember Metropolis, the great silent film by Fritz Lang, and probably the most revered science-fiction film of all times ? Well, if Snowpiercer is not such an absolute masterpiece, I do believe it's the best reiteration of the same concept that made Lang's film so unique : asking questions about the condition of mankind in a futuristic society, and how it does and does not evolve as compared with current times.

It's good that not all near-blockbuster scale sci-fi movies do not come out of Hollywood anymore. Snowpiercer is based on a long-forgotten 70's French graphic novel. The Korean director got his hands on a bootleg translation in a Seoul bookshop while filming The Host and got totally hooked. The end product is a French-Korean production, in the making of which one of the authors of the original graphic novel got directly involved.

The plot is simple : ecologist freaks have pushed governments to unleash a gas in the atmosphere to control global warming, this proved so effective that the world is now a standalone, snow-covered giant ice cap. The only survivors are all aboard a revolutionary train that goes on and on making loops around the world. It's like Noah's Ark, but including the politics that come with it : first class, second class, workers, fraudsters, the ticket is your fate - for generations. And the consequences are extreme, to such and extent that you can't conceive. Prepare to be shocked at times. Imagine the vertical multistoreyed humanity of Lang's Metropolis, the horizontal way. Some of the tail section fraudsters decide to rebel against their condition and progress to the head car of the train regardless of the risks. Every car they go through bears its grotesque and mind-bending surprises. And tells us more about how this society actually works and what it relies on.

This film has style. Even though it reminds of Gilliam (see 12 monkeys) and Matsumoto (Galaxy Express), there is real personality and originality. CGI is limited to a few breathtaking scenes that really add up to the storyline. Acting is mostly excellent, especially by Ed Harris and John Hurt. But most importantly, this film triggers reflection, soul-searching and debate like true Sci-Fi gems should. Unlike most Hollywood movies, it is not Manichaean : the story and morals are complex and debatable. You heart keeps swinging for scene to scene as you learn more. The ending asks a lot of questions.

All in all, when the end credits start rolling, it's a film you want to rewatch, not because you haven't understood, but because you want to understand more, and experience more.


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