8.8/10
7,835
11 user 1 critic
After surviving two bullets to the head, Courier Six traverses the post-apocalyptic Mojave desert in search of the men who wronged him, while making an impact on thousands in the process.

Director:

(as J.E. Sawyer)

Writers:

(lead writer), | 9 more credits »
Reviews
3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Benny (voice)
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Mr. New Vegas (voice)
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Chief Hanlon (voice)
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Narrator (voice)
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Arcade Israel Gannon (voice)
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Victor (voice)
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Marcus (voice)
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Raul Alfonso Tejada (voice)
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Caesar (voice)
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Yes Man (voice)
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Billy Knight (voice)
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Doc Mitchell (voice)
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Big Sal (voice)
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Storyline

As you were delivering a package to the New Vegas strip, a strange man stops you and captures you, only for you to be shot in the head. He leaves you for dead and takes your package. You awaken in a clinic in the town of Goodsprings, where a doctor heals you and helps you get back on your feet. You have to defeat this strange man and have him pay for his crimes and find out what's in the package.. or betray the residents of Goodsprings and other small towns for their money and property... it's all up to you. Written by Samkid101

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

M | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

19 October 2010 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the 2010 expansion "Dead Money", Courier 6 sets off to locate the signal of an invitation for the grand opening of the Sierra Madre Hotel. The expansion was inspired by the novel and 1948 film adaption starring Humphrey Bogart "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre". In the film and book, a group of compatriots set off to find the lost treasure of the Sierra Madre. See more »

Quotes

Robert Edwin House: Success depends on forethought, dispassionate calculation of probabilities, accounting for every stray variable.
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Connections

References The Fifth Element (1997) See more »

Soundtracks

Cobwebs and Rainbows
Music by Dick Walter (as Dick Stephen Walter)
Lyrics by Josh Sawyer (as J.E. Sawyer)
Performed by Josh Sawyer (as J.E. Sawyer)
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
A good game with excessively frustrating glitches.
2 March 2013 | by See all my reviews

For the record, I own the Ultimate Edition for Xbox 360, and have put the game onto my hard drive to try and diminish potential issues.

This review is a latecomer to the scene, as this game has been out for several years at this point. However, I think that I need to bring to light that while this game can be very enjoyable in the way most modern Bethesda games are, the terrible bugs that can randomly occur while playing this game greatly diminish the Fallout experience.

The story of the game is simple enough, and I won't review it this post. In short, it is a competent narrative that is a good enough hook to make the gamer invested in what happens. Side quests that are a staple of Bethesda sandbox games are omnipresent in this game, although I will say that it seems that compared to Fallout 3, this game seems to focus more on combat experience than quest experience. In Fallout 3 huge XP bonuses were gained only for completing quests. The more important the quest, the more XP awarded. In this game that still happens, but now there are bonuses in XP for completing certain combat challenges, such as killing X amount of enemies, popping pills Y amount of times, or drinking and eating Z amount of health. This isn't necessarily a detractor to the game, but it is a change and a focus shift that may bother some gamers.

The combat itself is very similar to previous Fallout games. VATS is still the go-to for combat, but one major improvement in the game was the ability to use iron sights for aiming guns manually. This is a very simple change, but it makes a big difference in combat, because alternating between manual aiming at enemies and using VATS becomes a more plausible option than in Fallout 3. There are several major problems that I personally have had in combat. Several times I have used VATS, only for my character to enter VATS mode for a prolonged period of time without shooting at the specified target. This is a problem because your character is still vulnerable in this mode, and you are rendered completely helpless to whatever enemies are attacking you. Another problem I have had is with the Mysterious Stranger perk. This stranger will show up and do his work, but then VATS mode will continually focus on him while you again helplessly take damage again. I have died at least fifteen times due to these two aforementioned bugs. I have had countless enemies get stuck in rocks or in walls, and have also at one point had to restart from a save because I walked over an uneven slope, and entered continuous and inescapable free fall.

Several other problems I have encountered are random freezing, and I have had several save files corrupt, ruining over 10 hours of game play. I have also occasionally had my screen change colors, often to an unplayable point where my screen was completely bright green.

Suggestions: Save often, and create at least five different save files. This will hopefully prevent losing progress from file corruption. If frame rate slows down, immediately save. Avoid the Mysterious Stranger Perk, and do not use VATS unless completely necessary. These are suggestions that solve the problems I have encountered, there may be more I haven't encountered. Overall it is a good experience, but all of the aforementioned issues have made it frustrating and unfortunately somewhat ruined the game experience for me.


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