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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

1-20 of 23 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Exclusive: Unlike Michael Phelps, Ryan Lochte Will Not Be Swimming With Sharks for Nat Geo Wild's SharkFest

6 July 2017 6:40 AM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Jeah?!

Who needs Discovery Channel’s annual Shark Week when you can watch Nat Geo Wild’s SharkFest? Well, that's Ryan Lochte's thinking, anyway.

The Olympic swimmer -- who is not Michael Phelps and is not going to be racing a great white shark on Discovery -- is dutifully promoting that other channel’s week-long shark-themed programming. In fact, that’s all the silver-haired athlete-turned-Dancing With the Stars competitor-turned-dad competitor is doing…

In an exclusive look at Nat Geo Wild’s new promo, Lochte begrudgingly embraces the “second best” stature that the channel has accepted for its own shark week, which it says is filled “with first-rate premieres.”

“Besides, No. 1 is a state of mind. Right, Ryan?” the narrator asks in the clip.

NatGeo

While Lochte is, sadly, not going to be facing off against any underwater predators in the imagined Lochte vs. Shark, SharkFest does promise to be a week full of thrills thanks »

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Rachel Weisz on the Importance of Secrets, Her Dream Job, and ‘My Cousin Rachel’

8 June 2017 5:10 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Characters like the one that gives its title to My Cousin Rachel are usually played with broad strokes, either to elicit extreme sympathy, or total disdain, and yet what Rachel Weisz does in Roger Michell’s adaptation of the Daphne du Maurier novel is unlike either of those, it’s a performance so layered that it would unfair to say it lies even in between. We are supposed to mistrust Rachel from the moment we first hear her name, after all she is the stranger who has seduced Philip’s (Sam Claflin) saintly cousin, made him renounce his bachelorhood, and abandon his beloved England. Not only that, but according to some suspicions, she might have even been behind his untimely death, meaning there is nothing left for Philip to do but seek revenge.

And yet upon meeting Rachel, Philip discovers something quite unexpected, rather than a severe gorgon, he finds her to be quite sensitive, »

- Jose Solís

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Annecy: ‘Chandasma,’ ‘Dom Fadrique’ Set for Mifa Pitches

30 May 2017 9:42 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Child soldiers, broken families, breast cancer, British imperialism: the subjects of the six animated feature projects selected for this year’s Annecy International Animated Film Market (Mifa) underscore the fact that animation made outside the U.S. these days is anything but escapist entertainment.

One of Annecy’s key market sections, its pitching sessions are also often a first sign of new talent hailing now from almost any part of the world. This year, two features from the ever-building world cinema animation scene, Colombia’s “Chandasma”and Portugal’s “Dom Fadrique,” figure among six movie projects to be pitched to buyers, sales agents and potential co-producers in the animated feature project section, at Mifa, which runs parallel to France’s Annecy Animation Festival, the world’s biggest annual animation meet.

Set up at Colombia’s Timbo Studio, whose credits include ”Tropical Virus,” Chandasma” centers on Renata, a girl forced to »

- Emilio Mayorga

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‘Paris Can Wait,’ Eleanor Coppola’s French Valentine, Leads Arthouse Box Office Openers

14 May 2017 10:24 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As specialized distributors head to Cannes, Eleanor Coppola’s French valentine “Paris Can Wait” (Sony Pictures Classics) scored with arthouse moviegoers. It’s only the fourth 2017 limited release to break the increasingly rare $20,000 per-theater-average mark.

These days, movies with older audience appeal are sustaining the market — and will likely form the core demo for similar available new films at Cannes. Eleanor Coppola (“Apocalypse Now” documentary “Heart of Darkness”) makes her narrative film debut at 81 with her semi-autobiographical first screenplay, starring Diane Lane as the wife of a self-involved film producer (Alec Baldwin).

New York also saw a handful of other small but still promising initial results, led by Cate Blanchett stunt-theater piece “Manifesto” (Film Rise), Israeli marriage story “The Wedding Plan” (Roadside Attractions) and “Stefan Zweig: Farewell to Europe” (First Run).

Netflix’s timely Tribeca documentary “Get Me Roger Stone,” an eye-opening portrait of Donald Trump’s flamboyant dark knight, »

- Tom Brueggemann

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Rumble Fish,’ ‘Tampopo,’ ‘Kaili Blues,’ ‘La La Land,’ and More

25 April 2017 5:23 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Anatahan (Josef von Sternberg)

Josef von Sternberg called Anatahan his best film. Borne from more than a decade’s worth of frustration with the studio system, it was, as the last picture he completed, his stamp on his time as a director. Even then, when released in 1953, it was only released in a butchered format, and, as it often goes in such cases, was subsequently abandoned by popular consciousness. But a few times each year, cinephiles (at least »

- The Film Stage

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Music Box Films Co-Founder Edward Arentz Leaves Company

18 April 2017 10:03 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Edward Arentz, the managing director of Music Box Films, is leaving the art-house distribution company he co-founded with William Schopf nine years ago.

Arentz oversaw acquisition, marketing, and distribution at the boutique distribution label, which released nearly 100 titles in this period, including seven Academy Award nominees.

Music Box’s first success came with 2008’s “Tell No One,” based on Harlan Coben’s bestseller. Its other major titles include the original Swedish version of “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo,” starring Noomi Rapace; Terence Davies’ “The Deep Blue Sea,” starring Rachel Weisz and Tom Hiddleston; Pawel Pawlikowski’s Oscar winner “Ida”; the Sundance audience award-winning documentary “Meru” from 2015; and the recent double Oscar  nominee “A Man Called Ove.”

Arentz said, “It’s been a wonderful run with Music Box. We’ve had great success identifying and championing highly accomplished yet undervalued films, returned significant overages to our licensors, and I had »

- Dave McNary

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Music Box Films Co-Founder Edward Arentz Steps Down

18 April 2017 9:08 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Music Box Films managing director Edward Arentz is leaving the company he co-founded with William Schopf in 2007. Arentz oversaw acquisition, marketing and distribution at the arthouse distributor, which has released nearly 100 titles and earned seven Academy Award nominations. One of the company’s most recent hits, the Swedish comedy “A Man Called Ove,” was the highest-grossing foreign-language movie of the year, taking in $3.3. million, and earned an Oscar nomination for Best Foreign Language Film.

Read More: How ‘A Man Called Ove’ Became a Sleeper For the Best Foreign Film Oscar

Some of the company’s other standout titles include 2008’s “Tell No One,” based on Harlen Coben’s bestseller; the original Swedish version of “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo,” starring Noomi Rapace; Terence Davies’s “The Deep Blue Sea,” starring Rachel Weisz and Tom Hiddleston; Pawel Pawlikowski’s Foreign Language Oscar-winning “Ida,” and the Sundance Audience Award-winning documentary “Meru. »

- Graham Winfrey

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Donnie Darko,’ ‘Split,’ ‘Ali,’ and More

18 April 2017 5:22 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Donnie Darko (Richard Kelly)

Last year marked the 15-year anniversary of Richard Kelly’s debut cult curio, Donnie Darko. While the film’s cult-status has elevated it into its own separate canon alongside other 21st-century indie-cult hits, Kelly’s two other films — the positively delirious and daring Southland Tales and the labyrinthine sci-fi period piece The Box — prove that he is a director deserving of much greater consideration. Sadly it’s been about eight years since a new »

- The Film Stage

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‘The Lost City of Z’ and ‘Norman’ Ride Specialty Box Office Surge

16 April 2017 10:32 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The slow specialty box office is picking up. “The Lost City of Z” (Bleecker Street) opened just below the numbers posted last week by “Colossal” (Neon) and “Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer” (Sony Pictures Classics) also opened to over $20,000. And “Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary” (Abramorama) showed strong initial single-theater results, with Emily Dickinson story “A Quiet Passion” (Music Box) also showing some interest.

After a promising start, “Colossal” expanded quickly, showing strength among wider audiences, along with “Gifted” (Fox Searchlight) and “Their Finest” (Stx). And holocaust drama “The Zookeeper’s Wife” (Focus) passed the $10 million mark in only its third weekend.

Festival favorite “Maudie,” a Canadian-Irish coproduction set in a small Nova Scotia town, opened in four Canadian theaters ahead of its June stateside release from Sony Classics Pictures, with a three day total of around $60,000. It stars Sally Hawkins and »

- Tom Brueggemann

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'A Quiet Passion' Review: Cynthia Nixon Shines as Emily Dickinson

12 April 2017 12:34 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

The Furious 8 crowd is advised to run for the hills. Terence Davies is a poet of cinema, of images, sounds and rhythms that define a life. Davies films move at a pace demanded by the material, not fidgety audiences. His remarkable debut features – 1988's Distant Voices, Still Lives and 1992's The Long Day Closes – are drawn from his own growing up experiences as the youngest of 10 children in a working-class Catholic family in Liverpool. To deal with an abusive father, he escaped into music and movies.

Just one reason that »

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Toni Erdmann,’ ‘Daughters of the Dust,’ Jacques Demy, and More

11 April 2017 6:21 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Daughters of the Dust (Julie Dash)

At the dawn of the 20th century, a multi-generational family in the Gullah community on the Sea Islands off of South Carolina – former West African slaves who adopted many of their ancestors’ Yoruba traditions – struggle to maintain their cultural heritage and folklore while contemplating a migration to the mainland, even further from their roots. Cohen Media Group is proud to present the 25th anniversary restoration of director Julie Dash’s landmark film Daughters of the Dust. »

- The Film Stage

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Feeling as others do, part 3 by Anne-Katrin Titze

5 April 2017 6:20 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Cynthia Nixon shines as Emily Dickinson in A Quiet Passion Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

A Film Comment Presents selection at last year's New York Film Festival and a highlight of this year's Glasgow Film Festival, A Quiet Passion directed by Terence Davies looks at questions of the soul, family, war, creativity and how to be true to yourself - all in stunningly beautiful images shot by Florian Hoffmeister (The Deep Blue Sea) and with costumes by Catherine Marchand. Cynthia Nixon is a wonderful, knowing, doubting, twinkling Emily Dickinson. Jennifer Ehle as her sister Vinnie, her perfect match in loving banter and bitter argument. When their brother Austin (Duncan Duff) marries Susan Gilbert (Jodhi May) he gives them another sister. The female bonding comes across as effortless and their wit has lightning speed. Keith Carradine, as the patriarch Edward, rounds out the family dynamics.

Emily Dickinson (Cynthia Nixon) on disliking the role »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Paterson,’ ‘Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,’ ‘Three,’ and More

4 April 2017 7:36 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Paterson (Jim Jarmusch)

Jim Jarmusch proved he was back in a major way with Only Lovers Left Alive a few years ago, and the streak continues with Paterson, a calm, introspective drama with such positive views on marriage and creativity that I was left floored. In following the cyclical life of Adam Driver‘s Paterson, a bus driver in Paterson, New Jersey, who also has dreams of being a poet, Jarmusch superbly shows that one’s own life »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Silence,’ ‘Blow-Up,’ ’20th Century Women,’ and More

28 March 2017 9:01 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

20th Century Women (Mike Mills)

That emotional profundity most directors try to build to across an entire film? Mike Mills achieves it in every scene of 20th Century Women. There’s such a debilitating warmness to both the vibrant aesthetic and construction of its dynamic characters as Mills quickly soothes one into his story that you’re all the more caught off-guard as the flurry of emotional wallops are presented. Without ever hitting a tonal misstep, Mills’ latest »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Elle,’ ‘The Lovers on the Bridge,’ ‘Fences,’ and More

14 March 2017 10:23 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Elle (Paul Verhoeven)

Paul Verhoeven’s latest treatise on high / low art isn’t going to appeal to everyone, and, as this awards season has shown, it’s already deeply offended some. But its messiness and blurred moral provocations are key to its power as a piece of cinematic trickery. A masterful character study, Elle dresses up a pulpy morality play with an austere European arthouse sheen, then sends its powerfully passive lead through a minefield of ethical conundrums, »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Jackie,’ ’45 Years,’ ‘One More Time With Feeling,’ and More

7 March 2017 7:20 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

45 Years (Andrew Haigh)

Andrew Haigh’s third feature as a director, 45 Years, is an excellent companion piece to its 2011 predecessor, Weekend. The latter examined the inception of a potential relationship between two men over the course of a weekend, whereas its successor considers the opposite extreme. Again sticking to a tight timeframe, the film chronicles the six days leading up to a couple’s 45th wedding anniversary. Though highly accomplished, Weekend nevertheless suffered from a tendency towards commenting »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Before’ Trilogy, ‘Moonlight,’ ‘Kate Plays Christine,’ ‘Allied,’ and More

28 February 2017 6:12 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Allied (Robert Zemeckis)

That thing we can’t take for granted: a film whose many parts – period piece, war picture, blood-spattered actioner, deception-fueled espionage thriller, sexy romance, and, at certain turns, comedy – can gracefully move in conjunction and separate from each other, just as its labyrinthine-but-not-quite plot jumps from one setpiece to the next with little trouble in maintaining a consistency of overall pleasure. Another late-career triumph for Robert Zemeckis, and one of the year’s few truly great American movies. »

- The Film Stage

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Cynthia Nixon Gets Poetic As Emily Dickinson In New Trailer For Terence Davies’ ‘A Quiet Passion’

23 February 2017 8:58 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Terence Davies‘ upcoming biopic “A Quiet Passion” has a new UK trailer, bringing viewers a taste of the drama that follows the story of famed American poet Emily Dickinson played by Cynthia Nixon of “Sex and the City” fame.

The drama takes us into the life of Dickinson, with Davies delivering his third straight woman-led drama, following 2011’s “The Deep Blue Sea” and 2015’s “Sunset Song.” Here’s the official synopsis:

The story of 19th century American poet Emily Dickinson is brought to vivid life, in a remarkably sensitive biopic by director Terence Davies, exploring her early days as a young schoolgirl, through to her later years as a recluse.

Continue reading Cynthia Nixon Gets Poetic As Emily Dickinson In New Trailer For Terence Davies’ ‘A Quiet Passion’ at The Playlist. »

- Jay Hunter

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Manchester by the Sea,’ ‘Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown,’ and More

21 February 2017 7:44 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Fireworks Wednesday (Asghar Farhadi)

After a festival tour back in 2006, Asghar Farhadi’s Fireworks Wednesday was theatrically re-released by the newly established Grasshopper Films, and now it’s arriving on DVD. The drama is another precisely calibrated, culturally specific demonstration of Farhadi’s skills in constructing empathy machines. Further in line with the director’s filmography, this story has a nesting-doll structure that combines ingrained social hierarchies, domestic drama, and a tragic intersection of misunderstandings. And while it »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Arrival,’ ‘The Edge of Seventeen,’ ‘The Tree of Wooden Clogs’ & More

14 February 2017 6:50 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Arrival (Denis Villeneuve)

Within the alien subgenre, there lies another. Therein, knowledge is treasure and the fifth dimension is love. The major rule: once the mystery and the chills have subsided, the revelations are enlightening and the welcomes warm. Thankfully, Denis Villeneuve‘s Arrival is more worthwhile than that. The film juggles a bit of world-building with meaty, compelling characters while trying to make linguistics look cool. No easy task, but the film does so in a breeze »

- The Film Stage

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

1-20 of 23 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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