8.1/10
11
5 user

Land of Higher Peace (2011)

Land of Higher Peace looks at the daily challenges Ethiopians face through the eyes of a group of well-meaning Americans in the small northern town of Gondar. The film observes the ... See full summary »

Director:

Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Asaye Asnake ...
Himself
Glynn Dalhke ...
Himself
Sara Dalhke ...
Herself
Jason Darden ...
Himself
Frank Jones ...
Himself
Kasey Ray-Stokes
Edit

Storyline

Land of Higher Peace looks at the daily challenges Ethiopians face through the eyes of a group of well-meaning Americans in the small northern town of Gondar. The film observes the concurrent pain and beauty of Ethiopia through the unique perspectives of each member, revealing the impact our lives can have on a global scale. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Seeing is receiving.

Genres:

Documentary

Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

2011 (USA)  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Outstanding content and artistry
15 August 2010 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

While humanitarian organizations such as World Vision and Compassion International produce high-quality informational videos and documentaries about their work in impoverished companies, Mark Stokes' film, "Land of Higher Peace," rivals such productions with its quality and emotional depth.

Throughout the film, the viewer is drawn into the poverty-infested country of Ethiopia without being unfairly manipulated by cheap emotional landmines. One witnesses and experiences the sights and sounds of the orphanage, the market, and the slums as if he were actually traveling along with the team in the film. While the film does an excellent job of capturing the emotions and the experiences of the team, free of coercion, one can hardly watch and NOT be personally drawn in and deeply affected.

As if the brilliant videography and editing weren't enough, the beautiful musical score transports the viewer directly to the soil of Ethiopia with its haunting melodies and instrumentation. Bruce Kiesling's expert production enhances the film with indescribable depth and artistry.

The JamesWorks team is to be commended for such an authentic yet artful rendering of but one tiny story in the epic novel of eradicating poverty and caring for the hurting.


2 of 2 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page