Trabalhar Cansa (2011) - News Poster

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Top 100 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2016: #65. Marco Dutra’s Era el Cielo

Era el Cielo

Director: Marco Dutra

Writers: Lucia Puenzo, Caetano Gotardo, Sergio Bizzio

Brazilian director Marco Dutra‘s first feature (review), 2011’s Hard Labor (co-directed by Juliana Rojas) premiered in Un Certain Regard at Cannes and finally reached theatrical release in the Us several months ago courtesy of Kino Lorber. Since then, he directed the solo feature Era el Cielo (When I Was Alive), and will be ready with his third film, It Was Heaven in 2016. Dutra directs from a script co-authored by Hard Labor writer Caetano Gotardo and the team behind Xxy (2007), Sergio Bizzio and Argentinean director Lucia Puenzo. His first Spanish language production concerns “questioning masculinity roles, sexuality, and barriers of intimacy,” in a narrative about a man who comes home to see his wife violated by two strangers. Paralyzed, he doesn’t come to her rescue and she doesn’t realize he’s witnessed the attack. She
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Rt Features, Mundial, Pact For Dutra’s ‘Cielo’ (Exclusive)

Buenos Aires – Brazil’s Rt Features and Mundial, a joint venture of Im Global and Canana, the top Mexican production house, have pacted for Mundial to acquire world sales rights to “Era el Cielo,” written by Lucia Puenzo (“The German Doctor”) and highly-anticipated next feature of Brazilian Marco Dutra.

Deal links Mundial with Rodrigo Teixeira’s Sao Paulo-based Rt Features, one of Latin America’s most exciting – and unusual – film outfits. Producer of Noah Baumbach’s “Francis Ha,” Robert Eggers’ “The Witch” and James Gray’s upcoming “To the Stars,” Rt Features has also driven hard into a new generation of Brazilian directors, melding arthouse concerns with genre and narrative drive. “Cielo” is Mundial’s first deal with Rt Features.

First out of the gate, so one of their leading lights, is Dutra, whose Dezenove-produced debut “Hard Labor,” earned an Un Certain Regard slot, established him immediately as a talent to track.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Hard Labor (Trabalhar Cansa) | Review

There’s a Ghost in Me: Dutra and Rojas Explore the Reductive State of Capitalism

The changing socioeconomic landscape in Brazil has had a direct impact on the burgeoning cinematic landscape as well. The country’s move into a capitalist economy has resulted in significant shifts, whether that is what defines a sense of neighborhood and community in recent offerings from Sergio Bianchi with The Tenants (2009) or Kleber Mendonca Filho’s Neighboring Sounds (2012) or the opportunities afforded members of the working class causing unavoidable fissures in traditional behaviors, like The Second Mother (2015). In Hard Labor, the directorial debut of Marco Dutra and Juliana Rojas, gender and class expectations are bungled in unexpected ways, where social upsets reveal the rotting infrastructure from within. Filled with allegorical instances, the striking debut unfolds with the delirious menace one would expect from a horror film, yet stays invested in the daily banalities of aching social reminders of limitations.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Watch: Getting Back on Your Feet is a Terrifying Ordeal in Trailer for Brazilian Horror 'Hard Labor'

2015 has been an outstanding year for Brazilian cinema in the U.S. with several acclaimed films opening theatrically across all genres. "A Wolf at the Door," "The Second Mother," "The Moving Creatures," "I Touched All Your Stuff," co-productions such as "Trash," and the upcoming animated feature "The Boy and the World," all give us a taste of the the sophisticated and authentic stories being produced in the South American nation. However, the horror genre had not been truly represented among these offers until now.

Marco Dutra and Juliana Rojas' "Hard Labor" was originally released in its home country back in 2011 and played in competition in the Un Certain Regard section of the Cannes Film Festival that year, but is just now getting a theatrical release thanks to the recently launched distribution company Cinema Slate. This unsettling portrait of the social and economic issues that afflict the modern world intelligently uses the horror genre as a means to decisively deliver its bold ideas.

"Hard Labor" opens on October 30, just in time for Halloween, at New York's Cinema Village.

The official synopsis reads: "In 'Hard Labor,' a straight middle-class couple slowly succumbs to the allures of entrepreneurship – and the horrors of an increasingly schizophrenic job market. Although emotionally in sync, Helena (Helena Albergaria) and her white-collar husband Otavio (Marat Descartes), suddenly find themselves at opposite ends of the labor force: just as she gets ready to open a grocery store (and become a business owner), he is fired from a “stable” job. As Otávio goes through a series of humiliating and ego-crushing job interviews (and is forced to re-invent himself for a new job market), Helena jumpstarts her grocery store in a mysterious (and progressively deteriorating) building. Soon enough, her enthusiasm for a better future begins to give way to a dark, pervasive doom – and Otávio’s self-upgrading morphs into an eerie transformation.Beautifully translating the evanescent forces of cyber-age economics into a Grand Guignol of kitchen-sink sensibilities, 'Hard Labor' is unlike any other Brazilian film you’ve seen in the last decade."

Take a look at the official poster below:
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Brazilian Horror! Chilling Thriller Hard Labor to Open in NYC

Acclaimed Latin American shocker to open in NYC this month. Award winning Brazilian domestic horror film Hard Labor (aka Trabalhar Cansa) is set to open theatrically at New York’s Cinema Village on October 30th. The film will then expand its North American screen presence throughout the year. Hard Labor is the feature debut by Brazilian co-directors…

The post Brazilian Horror! Chilling Thriller Hard Labor to Open in NYC appeared first on Shock Till You Drop.
See full article at shocktillyoudrop »

Exclusive Trailer: In Brazilian Drama 'The Moving Creatures' Daily Life Unfolds in Unique Ways

Cinema Slate will handle the New York theatrical release of Caetano Gotardo’s feature debut "The Moving Creatures." The film was written and directed by Caetano Gotardo and features songs by Gotardo and Marco Dutra ("Hard Labor"). It stars Cida Moreira (as Maria Júlia), Andrea Marquee (as Silvia), Fernanda Vianna (as Ana) and Rômulo Braga (as Eduardo).

This is the second film in the ongoing Brazilian Film Series: Year One (following "I Touched All Your Stuff," to be released on August 28), "The Moving Creatures" was an official selection at the Miami International Film Festival and won a Best Actress (Cida Moreira) and Best Film (Fiction) award at Berlin’s Latin American Film Festival (Lakino).

For more info on the film visit Here

Here is the official synopsis:

In Caetano Gotardo’s lyrical omnibus film "The Moving Creatures" (O Que se Move), three very different mothers are confronted, through three very different trials-by-ordeal, with the limits of what a mother “just knows”. With little fanfare (and not a whiff of the blatant “interconnectedness” often de rigeur among multi-story films), the daily rhythms and textures of three families unfold before us. And at the end of each story, all three mothers emerge from their private crucibles with an understanding — though one that can only be expressed in a way that erupts into the film’s very reality.

In the film’s first story, a mother (Maria Júlia, played by famed Brazilian actress, singer and performer Cida Moreira), learns about her son’s most intimate secret maybe a minute too late. On the second tale, an enigmatically afflicted sound engineer (Eduardo, played by Rômulo Braga) skulks through his day of nausea and confusion, while his wife Silvia (Andréa Marquee) muses on the scope of infant wisdom with a friend, as the two gaze at the former’s child. What happens next throws both parents into a state of trauma. The last story follows João (Henrique Schafer) and Ana (Fernanda Vianna), on their preparations to re-encounter their long-lost son.

The film will open on Sept 11 at Cinema Village in NYC and that it will also be available on Fandor.com on the same day. Take a look at the exclusive trailer below.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Cinema Slate, Fandor in Brazilian film pact

  • ScreenDaily
Cinema Slate, Fandor in Brazilian film pact
Cinema Slate, a new distributor focused on Latin American cinema launched by Rodrigo Brandão, has struck a deal with streaming service Fandor to release four films.

The titles are part of Cinema Slate’s Brazilian Film Series: Year One showcasing up-and-coming Brazilian directors and will go out theatrically via the New York-based Cinema Slate day-and-date with digital launches through Fandor.

The promgramme begins on September 11 at New York’s Cinema Village with Cateano Gotardo’s omnibus film The Moving Creatures (O Que Se Move).

The series will be co-presented with New York-based Cinema Tropical, a leading presenter of Latin American cinema in the Us, and sponsored by Brazilian Press, a newspaper servicing the Brazilian community in the East Coast.

October 30 brings the release of Hard Labor (Trabalhar Cansa) co-directed by Marco Dutra and Juliana Rojas.

The third and fourth films in the series set for November and December are Fellipe Barbosa’s semi-autobiographical tale Casa Grande and Eryk Rocha
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Mike Leigh to Receive BAFTA Fellowship

Mike Leigh to Receive BAFTA Fellowship
London — The British Academy of Film and Television Arts will present Mike Leigh with the BAFTA Fellowship, its highest accolade, at the film awards ceremony on Feb. 8 in London.

The annual award is given to an individual in recognition of an outstanding and exceptional contribution to film, television or games.

Those previously honored for their work in film include Charlie Chaplin, Alfred Hitchcock, Steven Spielberg, Sean Connery, Elizabeth Taylor, Stanley Kubrick, Anthony Hopkins, Laurence Olivier, Judi Dench, Vanessa Redgrave, Christopher Lee, Martin Scorsese and Alan Parker. Helen Mirren received the Fellowship at last year’s film awards.

Amanda Berry, chief executive of BAFTA, described Leigh as “one of Britain’s finest filmmakers.” She added: “He is a true innovator, an artist and an exceptional filmmaker.”

Leigh trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, at the Camberwell and Central Schools of Art and at the London Film School, of which he is now the chairman.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Come To My Voice’ Tops Argentina’s Mar del Plata Fest

Mar Del Plata, Argentina – Huseyin Karabey’s “Come to My Voice” topped the 29th Mar del Plata Fest on Saturday night, winning the Golden Astor for best film in International Competition. Karabey accepted the award from Paul Schrader, International Competition president.

Elsewhere, top plaudits in major sections had the virtue of shining a light on titles that threaten, like “Voice,” to be lost in the big festival title surfeit at a festival which, with hiked attendance, classy international guest master classes, federal government backing, stable management and dates pushed back to just before Buenos Aires’ Ventana Sur, has laid the foundations for further growth in the future.

Framed in a bard’s song and set in a Kurdish village, “Voice” tells a Kafkaesque tale of an ageing woman and young granddaughter forced to come up wuth non-existent guns that they can turn into Turkish authorities in the hope of freeing
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Brazil Locals Embrace Sci-Fi and Scary Films

Brazil Locals Embrace Sci-Fi and Scary Films
The surge in Latin America’s genre scene has rubbed off on Brazil.

Traditionally driven by local comedies and crossover movies from big auteurs such as Walter Salles or Fernando Meirelles, Brazilian production is plunging into local sci-fi, horror pics and thrillers and garnering strong international sales and multiple festival plaudits.

One example: Fernando Coimbra’s drama-thriller “A Wolf at the Door,” the first Brazilian pick-up by sales company Mundial — the joint-venture of Im Global and Mexico’s Canana — which has widely sold abroad, including the U.S. (Outsider Pictures), and snagged kudos at Miami, Havana, Rio and San Sebastian festivals.

Cult helmer Rodrigo Aragao’s zombie pic “Black Sea” won honors at December’s Ventana Sur. Also at that fest, filmmakers Juliana Rojas and Marco Dutra, directors of Cannes’ 2011 Un Certain Regard entry “Hard Labor,” unveiled buzz project “Good Manners,” dubbed a Brazilian “Rosemary’s Baby”.

At Cannes, Dezenove
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Devil Brings Up The Past In The First Trailer For Brazilian Horror Quando EU Era Vivo

Brazilian cinema finally seems to be waking up to genre films in 2014. Only a few weeks after the commercial release of Rodrigo Aragão's splatterfest Mar Negro, it's time for one of the most promising talents in Brazilian film to show his new work to local audiences.In his first solo effort after a solid career in short films and a debut feature (Hard Labor) co-directed by Juliana Rojas, Marco Dutra teamed up with producer Rodrigo Teixeira (Frances Ha) to venture into supernatural territory with the psychological thriller Quando Eu Era Vivo ("When I Was Alive" in a literal translation), which opened to great reviews in several cities this Friday. Based on a novel by cult writer Lourenço Mutarelli, the film tells the story of Junior...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Ventana Sur boosts Cannes' LatAm presence

  • ScreenDaily
Ventana Sur boosts Cannes' LatAm presence
The presence of Latin America films in Cannes has grown by 40% since 2009, when Ventana Sur was created by Incaa (Argentina’s film institute) and Marché du Film/Festival de Cannes.

This is one of the achievements of the film market that, now in its 5th edition (Dec 3-6) in Buenos Aires, has become the biggest gathering of its kind for Latin America’s titles.

“Ventana Sur has been instrumental in growing the Latin American presence in Cannes,” said Jérome Paillard, who shares the executive direction of Ventana Sur with Bernardo Bergeret.

Pablo Giorgelli’s Las Acacias and Michael Rowe’s Año Bisiesto, which started their careers in Buenos Aires, won the Cannes Camera d’Or in 2011 and 2010, respectively.”

Bergeret added: “Other examples of films that had international recognition and started here are Paraisos Artificiales (Mexico), El Tunel de los Huesos (Argentina), Jardín de Amapolas (Colombia), De Martes a Martes (Argentina), Solo (Uruguay), Ausente (Argentina), Los insolitos peces gato
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Urban Flies With Vollalobos’ Comedy ‘Feathers’

Urban Flies With Vollalobos’ Comedy ‘Feathers’
Frederic Corvez’s Paris-based Urban Distribution Intl. (Udi) has boardes “Por las plumas” (“All About the Feathers”), one of five projects being presented at a work-in-progress showcase for buzz Latin American titles.

Udi will rep the pic in international markets. The spotlight section — the first hosted by the Cannes Film Market — was organized in partnership with the Bafici Buenos Aires Lab (Bal), which took place in April (see story, page 16).

Costa-Rican first-timer helmer Neto Villalobos’ feel-good comedy “Feathers” turns on a bored security guard’s budding bromance with his rooster. The project won Bal’s Sinsistema post-production prize and Miami’s Encuentros. “Feather”s is produced by Costa Rica-based La Sucia.

Urban Distribution’s Urban Factory, is set to co-produce €2.5 million ($3.2 million) werewolf horror-fantasy, “As boas maneiras” (“Good Manners”), helmed by Marco Dutra and Juliana Rojas, the Brazilians behind Un Certain Regard-preeming “Hard Labor”. Urban Distribution Intl. will handle sales.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

LatinoBuzz: Havana Film Festival New York Closes with Cuban Zombie Comedy Juan of the Dead

Why a Cuban Festival?

I’ve attended the Havana Film Festival New York for a couple years and have heard lots of reactions. People who are at the Quad Cinema (the festival’s main venue) to watch other non-festival films sometimes wander up to the information table, look over a catalogue, and ask things like, “Movies from Cuba, is that legal?” I once heard an old guy mutter “Havana! Why would you support communism?” and storm out of the theater. I guess this is the consequence of a trade embargo that not only stops the flow of money between the U.S. and Cuba but can also inhibit cultural exchange. American Friends of the Ludwig Foundation of Cuba, the organization which produces the festival, is committed to “building cultural bridges between the United States and Cuba.”

The Festival--a Family Affair

The Havana Film Festival New York does exactly that. The 13th annual festival screened 40 films from across Latin America and hosted almost as many filmmakers. Directors, actors, and producers were flown in from Cuba, Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Puerto Rico and Guatemala. The festival’s small scale creates a close-knit community of filmmakers who end up watching and discussing each other’s films at dinners that last into the wee hours of the night. At the Closing Night Awards Ceremony last Friday, Sergio Ramirez, director of Distancia (Distance) (Isa:Producccions Concepcio) said it best, “The beautiful thing about this festival is that you feel like you are with family.”

Closing Night Awards Ceremony--a Guatemalan Sweep

Ramirez, a Guatemalan filmmaker, was the big winner of the night being awarded the Havana Star Prize for both Best Picture and Best Director. Best Screenplay went to Juliana Rojas and Marco Dutra for Trabalhar Cansa (Hard Labor)(Isa:Cinema Do Brazil). The Brazilian thriller was the pair’s first feature and had its world premiere at Cannes. Con mi corazón en Yambo (With My Heart in Yambo), by Maria Fernanda Restrepo won the Havana Star Prize for Best Documentary.

Closing Night Screening--Severed Limbs, Blood Hungry Zombies, and Social Commentary

The absolute highlight of the night was the New York Premiere of the hilarious and campy Cuban zombie film Juan de los Muertos (Juan of the Dead)(Isa:LatinoFusion). As Havana becomes flooded with zombies, the Cuban government declares that the living dead are just dissidents paid by the U.S. to stir things up. Juan, a part-time thief and full-time slacker steps in and starts a zombie-killing service.

Billed as Cuba’s first zombie movie, it’s a Spanish-Cuban co-production with a $3 million budget. It’s probably not appropriate to quote exactly what the director, Alejandro Brugués, said when asked how he managed to put together millions for the film but let’s just say he alluded to sexual favors. Brugués clearly doesn’t take himself or the film too seriously. When a young woman asked his thoughts on the impact his film and other Cuban art has on its society he shrugged his shoulders, “It’s a zombie movie.”

But it’s not just a zombie movie, it’s so much more. Yes, there are severed bodies and gallons upon gallons of splattered blood but the film is able to take the genre much further. He not only injects humor into the film but also makes sharp social commentary about Cuban society.

Media Buzz and Distribution--a Planned Accident

The director’s secret weapon, a media savvy producer, built up a huge buzz landing a New York Times review and eventually theatrical, DVD and digital distribution deals. “There was no specific media strategy,” says Brugués, “but everyone knew about it. There were heads and arms strewn all around. The shoot wasn’t even over and people were asking where they could see the movie.” It’s rare for a Latin American film to land in U.S. theaters but audiences’ love for the zom-com surely helped. Cinetic Media handled North American sales. U.S. theatrical rights were nabbed by Outsider Pictures, with a limited release planned for about 20 cities. Focus World, operated by Focus Features, will release the movie on August 14 via VOD and DVD. Major international sales deals ramped up after its Toronto premiere including Germany, Russia, Spain, UK and Japan.

If You Were a Zombie...

When the film premiered in Cuba at the Festival Internacional de Nuevo Cine Latino in Havana, the lines snaked around the block. Everywhere it’s played extra screenings have been added. And even with worldwide sales Alejandro Brugués stays humble. I asked him what would happen if he was a zombie. “Oh that’s easy. I’m the most useless person in the world. I’m a director and all I know how to do is make films. I would be the first one that would get eaten.”

Vanessa Erazo Bio:

After having spent several years working for various film festivals--such as the International Latino Film Festival - San Francisco Bay Area, the International Contemporary Film Festival of Mexico City (Ficco), the Hola Mexico Film Festival, and the Havana Film Festival New York--in a variety of roles, Vanessa Erazo now acts as the Documentary Programmer at the New York International Latino Film Festival. She has curated films on a wide range of topics such as human rights, autism, sports, adoption and homelessness. She is also a regular film contributor for Remezcla--an online Latino culture guide. Until recently, she served as the Programming Co-chair for the New York chapter of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers. Currently, she works coordinating post-donation care for bone marrow donors at Dkms Americas, the world’s largest donor center. And in her spare time, she obsessively posts on twitter sharing everything she can find on Latin American film with her 2,000+ followers. Vanessa holds a Master’s Degree in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from New York University and a B.A. in Political Science from San Francisco State University.

Vanessa's Links:

New York Latino Ff website: www.nylatinofilm.com

Remezcla website:

Nalip: www.nalip.org

Dkms Americas website: www.GetSwabbed.org

My Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/infocinelandia

I collect links for articles I have written on Tumblr: http://vanessaerazo.tumblr.com/
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

LatinoBuzz: Havana Film Festival New York Closes with Cuban Zombie Comedy Juan of the Dead

Why a Cuban Festival?

I’ve attended the Havana Film Festival New York for a couple years and have heard lots of reactions. People who are at the Quad Cinema (the festival’s main venue) to watch other non-festival films sometimes wander up to the information table, look over a catalogue, and ask things like, “Movies from Cuba, is that legal?” I once heard an old guy mutter “Havana! Why would you support communism?” and storm out of the theater. I guess this is the consequence of a trade embargo that not only stops the flow of money between the U.S. and Cuba but can also inhibit cultural exchange. American Friends of the Ludwig Foundation of Cuba, the organization which produces the festival, is committed to “building cultural bridges between the United States and Cuba.”

The Festival--a Family Affair

The Havana Film Festival New York does exactly that. The 13th annual festival screened 40 films from across Latin America and hosted almost as many filmmakers. Directors, actors, and producers were flown in from Cuba, Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Puerto Rico and Guatemala. The festival’s small scale creates a close-knit community of filmmakers who end up watching and discussing each other’s films at dinners that last into the wee hours of the night. At the Closing Night Awards Ceremony last Friday, Sergio Ramirez, director of Distancia (Distance) (Isa:Producccions Concepcio) said it best, “The beautiful thing about this festival is that you feel like you are with family.”

Closing Night Awards Ceremony--a Guatemalan Sweep

Ramirez, a Guatemalan filmmaker, was the big winner of the night being awarded the Havana Star Prize for both Best Picture and Best Director. Best Screenplay went to Juliana Rojas and Marco Dutra for Trabalhar Cansa (Hard Labor)(Isa:Cinema Do Brazil). The Brazilian thriller was the pair’s first feature and had its world premiere at Cannes. Con mi corazón en Yambo (With My Heart in Yambo), by Maria Fernanda Restrepo won the Havana Star Prize for Best Documentary.

Closing Night Screening--Severed Limbs, Blood Hungry Zombies, and Social Commentary

The absolute highlight of the night was the New York Premiere of the hilarious and campy Cuban zombie film Juan de los Muertos (Juan of the Dead)(Isa:LatinoFusion). As Havana becomes flooded with zombies, the Cuban government declares that the living dead are just dissidents paid by the U.S. to stir things up. Juan, a part-time thief and full-time slacker steps in and starts a zombie-killing service.

Billed as Cuba’s first zombie movie, it’s a Spanish-Cuban co-production with a $3 million budget. It’s probably not appropriate to quote exactly what the director, Alejandro Brugués, said when asked how he managed to put together millions for the film but let’s just say he alluded to sexual favors. Brugués clearly doesn’t take himself or the film too seriously. When a young woman asked his thoughts on the impact his film and other Cuban art has on its society he shrugged his shoulders, “It’s a zombie movie.”

But it’s not just a zombie movie, it’s so much more. Yes, there are severed bodies and gallons upon gallons of splattered blood but the film is able to take the genre much further. He not only injects humor into the film but also makes sharp social commentary about Cuban society.

Media Buzz and Distribution--a Planned Accident

The director’s secret weapon, a media savvy producer, built up a huge buzz landing a New York Times review and eventually theatrical, DVD and digital distribution deals. “There was no specific media strategy,” says Brugués, “but everyone knew about it. There were heads and arms strewn all around. The shoot wasn’t even over and people were asking where they could see the movie.” It’s rare for a Latin American film to land in U.S. theaters but audiences’ love for the zom-com surely helped. Cinetic Media handled North American sales. U.S. theatrical rights were nabbed by Outsider Pictures, with a limited release planned for about 20 cities. Focus World, operated by Focus Features, will release the movie on August 14 via VOD and DVD. Major international sales deals ramped up after its Toronto premiere including Germany, Russia, Spain, UK and Japan.

If You Were a Zombie...

When the film premiered in Cuba at the Festival Internacional de Nuevo Cine Latino in Havana, the lines snaked around the block. Everywhere it’s played extra screenings have been added. And even with worldwide sales Alejandro Brugués stays humble. I asked him what would happen if he was a zombie. “Oh that’s easy. I’m the most useless person in the world. I’m a director and all I know how to do is make films. I would be the first one that would get eaten.”
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

South By Southwest 2012 Lineup Features 65 World Premieres

Sound On Sight will once again be covering the SXSW Film Festival this year, making it our second time attending. 130 feature films will screen at the Austin, Texas fest taking place March 9-17, including 65 World Premieres, 17 North American Premieres and 10 U.S. Premieres. As previously announced, Drew Goddard and Joss Whedon’s The Cabin in the Woods will have the honours of opening the festival, and now they have released the full list of films – and it’s looking pretty amazing. Enjoy!

Narrative Feature Competition

This year’s 8 films were selected from 1,112 submissions. Each film is a World Premiere. Films screening in Narrative Feature Competition are:

Booster

Director/Screenwriter: Matt Ruskin

When Simon’s brother is arrested for armed robbery, he is asked to commit a string of similar crimes in an attempt to get his brother acquitted.

Cast: Nico Stone, Adam DuPaul, Seymour Cassel, Kristin Dougherty, Brian McGrail (World Premiere)

Eden

Director: Megan Griffiths,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

SXSW Announces 2012 Feature Film Lineup

SXSW Announces 2012 Feature Film Lineup
The South by Southwest (SXSW) Film Conference and Festival is thrilled to announce the features lineup for this year's Festival, March 9 - 17, 2012 in Austin, Texas. We are also pleased to reveal the world premiere of Emmett Malloy's documentary Big Easy Express as our Closing Night Film, which follows a train ride unlike any other with Mumford & Sons, Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros and Old Crow Medicine Show. Big Easy Express will screen on Saturday, March 17. The program will also include the world premiere of Columbia Pictures and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures' 21 Jump Street, screening in the Centerpiece slot on Monday, March 12. The 2012 lineup continues the SXSW tradition of celebrating ambitious experimentation with risk takers both in front of and behind the camera, and a deep immersion into cultural touchstones. The Midnighters feature section and the Short Film program will be announced on February 8.

"SXSW has long been a haven for bold
See full article at MovieWeb »

SXSW 2012. Features Lineup

  • MUBI
Iggy Pop and Debbie Harry, shot by Bob Gruen in 1977

Rock 'N' Roll Exposed: The Photography of Bob Gruen

screens as part of 24 Beats per Second

SXSW Film has just announced its features lineup for the 2012 edition, running March 9 through 17. We already knew that the Opening Night Film would be Drew Goddard's The Cabin in the Woods. For its Closing Night Film, the festival will host the world premiere of of Emmett Malloy’s documentary Big Easy Express (more below). The lineup, with descriptions from the festival:

Narrative Feature Competition

Booster

Director/Screenwriter: Matt Ruskin. When Simon’s brother is arrested for armed robbery, he is asked to commit a string of similar crimes in an attempt to get his brother acquitted. Cast: Nico Stone, Adam DuPaul, Seymour Cassel, Kristin Dougherty, Brian McGrail. (World Premiere)

Eden

Director: Megan Griffiths, Screenwriters: Richard B. Phillips, Megan Griffiths, Story by: Richard B. Phillips & Chong Kim.
See full article at MUBI »

SXSW 2012 Line-Up Includes ’21 Jump Street,’ ‘The Raid,’ ‘Casa de mi Padre’ & More

  • The Film Stage
With Sundance 2012 Film Festival over, the next big one on the horizon is South by Southwest, which we’ll be heavily covering. The biggest chunk of the line-up has been announced today, which has some great premieres including 21 Jump Street, Tiff and Sundance hit The Raid, Will Ferrell‘s Casa de mi Padre, the documentary Girl Model (which we liked at Tiff), as well as the next from Broken Lizard, The Babymakers. There are many other promising titles included and you can see them all below. Check back for our coverage for the fest, kicking off March 9th.

Narrative Feature Competition

This year’s 8 films were selected from 1,112 submissions. Each film is a World Premiere. Films screening in Narrative Feature Competition are:

Booster

Director/Screenwriter: Matt Ruskin

When Simon’s brother is arrested for armed robbery, he is asked to commit a string of similar crimes in an attempt to get his brother acquitted.
See full article at The Film Stage »

South By Southwest 2012 Lineup Features World Premiere Of ’21 Jump Street,’ ‘God Bless America,’ ‘The Raid’ and Much More

South By Southwest 2012 Lineup Features World Premiere Of ’21 Jump Street,’ ‘God Bless America,’ ‘The Raid’ and Much More
Attendees of South by Southwest 2012 are in for a treat. 130 feature films will screen at the Austin, Texas festival taking place March 9-17. Among them are 65 World Premieres, 17 North American Premieres and 10 U.S. Premieres. The organization already announced [1] Drew Goddard and Joss Whedon's The Cabin in the Woods would open the festival (the movie is phenomenal [2]) and today the majority of the remaining line up has been revealed. One of the highlights is the unbelievably smart and hilarious 21 Jump Street, directed by Phil Lord & Christopher Miller. Both of those are World Premieres. Other highlights include The Hunter, Killer Joe, The Babymakers, frankie goes boom, God Bless America, The Imposter, The Raid, Bernie and Casa de mi Padre just to name a few. After the jump, read descriptions of all the films that have been announced so far. Before I copy and paste the rest of the list, a few minor notes.
See full article at Slash Film »
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