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"Leverage" The Studio Job (TV Episode 2010) Poster

(TV Series)

(2010)

Trivia

The song that Eliot (Christian Kane) uses to hook Kirkwood is a song co-written by Christian. It was released later that year (2010) on his band's country album "The House Rules."
When Mitchell Kirkwood ('John Schneider') is meeting with Sophie, his cell phone rings to the tune of "Dixie", - the same sound of the horn on the "General Lee"; the Dodge Charger in his hit TV show, "Dukes of Hazard".
Eliot's alias, Kenneth Crane, bears a close resemblance to the name Christian Kane, the actor's real name. In addition, the fans of Kenneth on the show call themselves "Craniacs". Christian really does sing and record songs, and his fans call themselves "Kaniacs".
Parker seems to be playing a character who spoofs Icelandic singer Bjork. For one thing, Parker wears a dress covered in yellow feathers, with the neck and head of a duck around her neck. Bjork wore a dress resembling a swan at the 73rd Academy Awards on March 25, 2001.
According to the DVD commentary, for the scene where Parker dances through the bar picking pockets for tickets, a ballet dancer was hired to do the same scene. The final edit shows the upper body of Parker, played by Beth Riesgraf, but that inter-cuts with the dancer's legs.
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John Schneider, who played Mitchell Kirkwood, is also a country singer.
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While describing Kirkwood to Nate, Kaye Lynn compares him to the devil and references the Charlie Daniels Band song "The Devil Went Down to Georgia".
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Sophie introduces herself as Virginia Ellington. John Schneider, who plays Mitchell Kirkwood, also starred as Bo Duke in The Dukes of Hazzard. Those two surnames put together make Duke Ellington, a great jazzpianist from the 1920s to '60s.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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