Pacific Rim
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A Note Regarding Spoilers

The following FAQ entries may contain spoilers. Only the biggest ones (if any) will be covered with spoiler tags. Spoiler tags have been used sparingly in order to make the page more readable.

For detailed information about the amounts and types of (a) sex and nudity, (b) violence and gore, (c) profanity, (d) alcohol, drugs, and smoking, and (e) frightening and intense scenes in this movie, consult the IMDb Parents Guide for this movie. The Parents Guide for Pacific Rim can be found here.

No, the director stated in a Comic Con 2012 panel interview that he did not want the robots moving like human beings, so traditional animation was used.

It's explained in the film, and further in the prequel comic, that the neural strain of controlling a 250 foot tall robot is just too much for one person to handle. Each pilot controls one side of the robot, left or right, similar to how humans use their brain hemispheres to control each side of their bodies. For more information, view Guillermo del Toro explaining it here. It could also be because of the intense concentration required to control the Jaegers: if one pilot loses focus, the other pilot can take over for a period of time. For more information, read here. Even though not factual, it also adds a story element of team work to add some complexity to the human factor of the Jaegers and adds some additional story elements regarding the mind melding of two people. After all, much of the core of the story is about humanity working together to overcome a seemingly impossible problem, so this is a good way to illustrate this.

Dropping a nuclear bomb in the middle of a large city would be an absolute last resort, as this would easily cause as much if not more damage than a giant, rampaging monster. Plus the contamination from the fallout would be catastrophic and unpredictable. In the prequel comic, it is explained that the first four kaiju to attack were, in fact, destroyed with nuclear weapons. The fourth kaiju, "Scissure", which attacked Sydney, apparently took several days to lure it out to the sea where it could be safely nuked without decimating and contaminating all of Sydney along with it. It is precisely for this reason that the Jaeger program was developed because, if humanity had to continue to drop nukes every time a kaiju showed up, that would wipe the human race out all on its own. Guillermo del Toro has stated that he does not intend Pacific Rim to be a "realistic" depiction of a giant monster invasion. Rather he intends the film to be a "beautiful poem to giant monsters"; that is, a stylized throwback to the giant monster genre. Also, as explained in the film, conventional weapons caused the kaiju's blood to contaminate the environment, a condition known as "kaiju blue."

This is a little hard to answer for sure, because we don't know the extent of the damage or disrepair that other Jaegers might have suffered. It could be that they always meant or hoped to repair other Jaegers, and that Gipsy Danger was simply the first of hopefully many, but they simply ran out of time, resources and money (remember that the PPDC has their funding cut at the beginning). It could be that Gipsy Danger was simply in the best condition out of the damaged Jaegers that they had, or was the one that they felt they could most reliably repair with what they had. Or it could be that Stacker Pentecost chose Gipsy Danger in particular to repair because he knew that Raleigh was still out there, and thus he always hoped that he could find Raleigh and bring him back to pilot a repaired Gipsy Danger. Some dialogue in the film seems to indicate this being a strong possibility. Gypsy Danger was the only nuclear powered Jaeger left. As such, fuel was easier to acquire to power it. Also, as explained in the film, there were newer generations of jaegers. Striker Eureka, the Australian jaeger, was "the first and last of the class 5 jaegers." Gipsy Danger was a class 3. Pentecost piloted a class 1. Mako was a specialist in Class 3 jaegers, which is why Gipsy was repaired/refitted. Older jaegers simply did not have the parts and/or tech to be repaired. In the film, they also went through great pains to explain that the Chinese and Russian jaegers were undefeated, and thus did not need repairs.

Pacific Rim's live-action elements were shot in 2D and converted, but the extensive CGI shots (including essentially all of the Jaeger v. Kaiju action) were rendered in native 3D and thus were not converted.

There are two possibilities: Chau theorizes that the baby wasn't fully grown before escaping its mother. One of the biggest dangers facing any infant born prematurely is that it's lungs and other organs aren't fully grown and it won't be able to breathe on its own. The other theory, which is more prominently shown in the film, is that it strangled on its own umbilical cord. An umbilical cord wrapped around the throat of an infant, is a serious danger to an infant just coming out of its mother's womb. It's also possible that eating Ron Perlman could have choked an adult kaiju to death.

Because the infant kaiju, not having any teeth, swallowed the character whole. If the infant had actually snapped him up by biting or chewing him, he'd probably be dead.

It was an electromagnetic pulse designed to short out and disable electronics.

No. As explained in the film, the rift was a portal between two dimensions. That it appeared to be going downwards is misleading.

The kaiju started getting bigger and attacking more often. Apparently, the early successes were on Class 1 and 2 kaiju. As stated in the film, the kaiju class system was based on the size and mass of the kaiju. Class 3 and higher kaiju were apparently more powerful than the existing jaeger technology. Also, every kaiju win meant dead jaeger pilots, and they were more difficult to replace than the jaegers. Also, at one point, it did appear that multiple jaegers were used at one time. Raleigh refers to "standard, two jaeger battle formation" during the final battle, but all the fights shown except one only had one jaeger. This more likely refers to a lack of pilots than a lack of jaegers.

Crimson Dynamo and Cherno Alpha (and to some extent during that fight, Striker Eureka,) faced several situations that were totally unknown and therefore surprised. Also, it appears that the kaiju had a lot of experience vs these jaegers and these particular kaiju were designed just to defeat them. This was also the first time any jaegers had fought two kaiju at the same time, which is what caused Cherno Alpha's defeat. The flying kaiju's tail seemed to be designed to destroy the heads of jaegers, which easily killed Crimson Dynamo. However, once these new features were used, the surprise factor was eliminated, and Gipsy Danger was able to anticipate and counter them. Conversely, Gipsy Danger had new features that the kaiju were unaware of, in particular the chain sword, so Gipsy had the element of surprise.

Yes. After the main credits, there is a short scene of Hannibal Chau slicing open the body of the kaiju that swallowed him, popping his head out, and exclaiming "Where is my goddamn shoe!" At the very end of the credits, it also has a special message, dedicating the film to the memory of both Ray Harryhausen (special effects pioneer for classics such as The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms, Jason and the Argonauts, the original Clash of the Titans and many more) and Ishiro Honda (director of the original Godzilla, as well as many of its sequels and other Japanese genre films, many of which inspired Pacific Rim and its source material).

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