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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

1-20 of 46 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Cannes Review: ‘Redoubtable’ Offers a Playful Pastiche on the Re-Radicalization of Jean-Luc Godard

19 hours ago | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

It’s more Pastiche du Godard than Histoire(s) du Godard in Michel Hazanavicius’ Redoubtable and that’s not a bad thing. The director’s slight but surprisingly playful account of nouvelle vague maestro Jean-Luc Godard’s marriage to actress Anne Wiazemsky and his re-radicalization in the late 1960s has the potential to infuriate the more devout of Godard followers but there is plenty of good-hearted goading and creative homage to savor for the less pedantic fan.

Honing in on a tumultuous time for Godard and his adoptive France, Hazanavicius charts the relationship between him and Wiazemsky from beginning — on the set of his 1967 film La Chinoise — to end, taking in the 1968 protests and subsequent student movement (“I like the movement, not the students,” he later exclaims) as well as Godard’s own abstract departures from his previous filmmaking methods. It marks a welcome return for the director (Michel that »

- Rory O'Connor

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Dhanush starting new film The Extraordinary Journey of the Fakir!

22 May 2017 8:33 AM, PDT | Bollyspice | See recent Bollyspice news »

A truly International collaboration, The Extraordinary Journey Of The Fakir, directed by Ken Scott and starring Indian actor Dhanush, rolled in Mumbai this week. The Extraordinary Journey Of The Fakir is produced by Brio Films, Vamonos Films, M! Capital Ventures, Little Red Car Films, Impact Films, Aurora Global Media Capital, Scope Pictures, TF1 Studio and Aleph Motion Pictures.

The film is based on “The Extraordinary Journey of the Fakir who got trapped in an Ikea wardrobe” by Romain Puertolas. The screen play of the film is by Puertolas and Luc Bossi (Brio films) and has a conglomeration of production houses from 3 different continents. The shooting has commenced earlier this month and is expected to be shot in Mumbai (India), Brussels (Belgium), Rome (Italy) and Paris (France).

Starring the inimitable Dhanush in the titular role of the Fakir, the film, as the name suggests, marks an extraordinary journey in the life »

- Stacey Yount

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Cannes 2017: The Redoutable review: Dir: Michel Hazanavicius (2017)

22 May 2017 8:08 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

The Redoutable review: Following a festival low with The Search back in 2014, Michel Hazanavicius returns for another pop at Cannes with a film based on French film god Jean-Luc Godard.

The Redoutable review by Paul Heath at the 2017 Festival de Cannes.

The Redoutable review

It has been six years since Michel Hazanavicius wowed the international film community with his Best Picture Oscar-winning silent movie The Artist back in 2011. With work on Les infidèles, a feature containing a series of short movies dropping the following year, and then war drama The Search arriving in 2014, the French director returns to the world of motion picture-themed narrative with this comedy-drama focusing on famed auteur Jean-Luc Godard in the time period of his second marriage 17-year old actress Anne Wiazemsky.

Related: The Square review (Cannes 2017)

The year is 1968 and French filmmaker Godard (Louis Garrel) is at the peak of his career, both Breathless and »

- Paul Heath

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2017 Cannes Critics’ Panel Day 5: Michel Hazanavicius Jump Cuts to Redoubtable

21 May 2017 2:55 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

The first week ends with the return of Michel Hazanavicius and his latest project, Redoubtable. He gave us the Oss films, Cannes invited The Artist and The Search, and this biopic on the original enfant terrible sees Louis Garrel as Jean-Luc Godard who falls in love with actress Anne Wiazemsky (Stacy Martin) while shooting a movie.

Continue reading »

- Eric Lavallée

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‘Redoubtable’: How Michel Hazanavicius and His Cast Found the Human in Often ‘Ridiculous’ Jean-Luc Godard — Cannes

21 May 2017 11:14 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

With his “Redoubtable,” Oscar-winning “The Artist” writer-director Michel Hazanavicius delivers another homage to period cinema, this time channeling Jean-Luc Godard’s moviemaking techniques as he portrays the cinema god during his late ’60s transition from groundbreaking film iconoclast to actual radical revolutionary. (Read Eric Kohn’s review here.)

American buyers are already sniffing around the feature film, one that could play well for older cinephiles who love Godard, an admittedly narrow niche.

French star Louis Garrel, who also appears in Arnaud Desplechin’s festival opener “Ismael’s Ghosts,” is superb as Godard and could land an acting prize. At the beginning, we get a glimpse of the director audiences are clearly expecting to see: confident, playful, and adoring his 19-year-old leading lady Anne Wiazemsky (Stacy Martin), gazing straight at her (and us) as the camera tracks by during the filming of “La Chinoise.”

Read More: The 2017 IndieWire Cannes Bible: Every Review, »

- Anne Thompson

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‘Redoubtable’: How Michel Hazanavicius and His Cast Found the Human in Often ‘Ridiculous’ Jean-Luc Godard — Cannes

21 May 2017 11:14 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

With his “Redoubtable,” Oscar-winning “The Artist” writer-director Michel Hazanavicius delivers another homage to period cinema, this time channeling Jean-Luc Godard’s moviemaking techniques as he portrays the cinema god during his late ’60s transition from groundbreaking film iconoclast to actual radical revolutionary. (Read Eric Kohn’s review here.)

American buyers are already sniffing around the feature film, one that could play well for older cinephiles who love Godard, an admittedly narrow niche.

French star Louis Garrel, who also appears in Arnaud Desplechin’s festival opener “Ismael’s Ghosts,” is superb as Godard and could land an acting prize. At the beginning, we get a glimpse of the director audiences are clearly expecting to see: confident, playful, and adoring his 19-year-old leading lady Anne Wiazemsky (Stacy Martin), gazing straight at her (and us) as the camera tracks by during the filming of “La Chinoise.”

Read More: The 2017 IndieWire Cannes Bible: Every Review, »

- Anne Thompson

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Michel Hazanavicius’ Jean-Luc Godard Pic ‘Redoubtable’ Is A Harmless, Mostly Charming Comedy For Film Geeks [Cannes Review]

21 May 2017 7:49 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Michel Hazanavicius (director of the breezy Best Picture Oscar winner “The Artist”) returns to Cannes and takes on legendary French New Wave film icon Jean-Luc Godard in his latest film, “Redoubtable” — bold move, especially after his previous film, “The Search,” bombed badly at the festival, and didn’t even earn a stateside release. But Godard worshipers and Hazanavicius skeptics should keep a couple of things in mind before sharpening their pitchforks.

Continue reading Michel HazanaviciusJean-Luc Godard Pic ‘Redoubtable’ Is A Harmless, Mostly Charming Comedy For Film Geeks [Cannes Review] at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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‘Redoubtable’ Cannes Review: Can a Sketch Comedy About Jean-Luc Godard Really Work?

20 May 2017 5:11 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Michel Hazanavicius rode a wave of Cannes acclaim to Oscar glory with 2011’s silent charmer “The Artist,” but his 2014 stab at the middlebrow “The Search” played to middling reviews and remains as of yet unreleased stateside. He need not fear a similar fate for latest film, the ultra-referential Jean-Luc Godard relationship dramedy “Redoubtable.” Because at least some knowledge of the cranky French New Wave auteur is essential for enjoyment here, the film probably won’t find “The Artist”-level success. But it might be the filmmaker’s most ambitious work to date, and that’s got to count for something. »

- Wrap Staff

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'Redoubtable': Film Review | Cannes 2017

20 May 2017 5:01 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

It feels both trivializing and audacious to treat the political radicalization and marriage breakup of Jean-Luc Godard as something verging on a buoyant comedy, but that’s what Michel Hazanavicius has done in Redoubtable. Returning to the well of cinema for inspiration after the deadly detour into modern European conflict with The Search, the man behind The Artist takes a knowing if rather breezy approach to the major turning point in a brilliant, and still active, artist’s life. Although the film manages some disarming insights into the man’s complex makeup and difficult behavior, a service enhanced by Louis Garrel’s very good »

- Todd McCarthy

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Cannes Film Review: ‘Redoubtable’

20 May 2017 4:29 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

When it was announced that the Cannes Film Festival would show “Redoubtable,” a biographical drama about Jean-Luc Godard written and directed by Michel Hazanavicius (“The Artist”), and that the movie would focus on the relationship between Godard and his second wife, the actress Anne Wiazemsky (it’s based on her roman à clef), the interest of almost every cinephile heading into Cannes was piqued — though for reasons that crept into the realm of guilty pleasure. Godard himself wasted no time giving the movie his seal of approval by declaring it “a stupid idea.” And whether or not it was Hazanavicius’ intent to tweak the legendary New Wave director, one of the film’s central attractions was how flippant and impish and downright gossipy it sounded. A biopic! About Jean-Luc Godard’s love life! Given the holy pedestal on which a lot of people still place Godard, what could be less… »

- Owen Gleiberman

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‘Redoubtable’ Review: Jean-Luc Godard Is Reborn as Louis Garrel In Michel Hazanavicius’ Charming Romance — Cannes 2017

20 May 2017 2:00 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As a filmmaker, Jean-Luc Godard is a brilliant enigma whose work offers more questions than answers. “Redoubtable” solves that challenge with an outside source: Adapted from actress-turned-author Anne Wiazemsky’s 2015 memoir, “Un An Apres” (“One Year Later”), this surprisingly endearing tragicomedy recounts her short-lived marriage to Godard and the moment in which the feisty filmmaker soured into the angry, outspoken political radical that became his post-’60s persona.

Written and directed by Michel Hazanavicius (“The Artist”), the movie toys with Godard’s own early filmmaking style in a wry effort to salute his legacy and demystify its evolution. Light and inoffensive, it trades the intellectual rigor of Godard’s work for fluffy sentiments, but never gets crass. Above all else, it succeeds at transforming cinephile trivia into a genuine crowdpleaser.

A welcome rebound after Hazanvicius’ misbegotten remake “The Search,” the new movie is a return to the colorful period details »

- Eric Kohn

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Cannes Theater Evacuated Due to Security Scare

20 May 2017 11:51 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

An errant bag left near the Debussy Theatre at the Cannes Film Festival caused a security scare Saturday resulting in an evacuation shortly before a 7:30 p.m. press screening of Michel Hazanavicius’s “Redoubtable.” The screening was delayed for roughly 20 minutes before the threat was cleared and press were invited back in.

Read More: Cannes 2017: 9 Hot Acquisition Titles That Will Have Buyers Chasing Foreign Films

While press were lined up waiting to enter, the staff of the theater were evacuated and security officials told members of the press to clear out. Cannes Press Attache Christine Aime told the crowd that an unidentified bag was being investigated. Some members of the press were convinced the screening was canceled and left.

All the people in the Debussy theatre came running out as security checked the errant bag inside. pic.twitter.com/tgnEVf9elY

— Anne Thompson (@akstanwyck) May 20, 2017

Cannes festival director »

- Graham Winfrey

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Cannes Theater Evacuated Amid Security Scare

20 May 2017 10:50 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

A Cannes cinema in the Palais was evacuated Saturday evening amid a security scare.

The city's Debussy cinema was cleared around 7:15 p.m. before the 7:30 p.m. press screening of Redoubtable, the latest film from Michel Hazanavicius, the director of The Artist. The comedy romance stars Louis Garrel, Stacy Martin, Berenice Bejo and Gregory Gadebois.

Security officials told the press that it was due to a suspicious bag in the theater. A security guard and a cop told THR that it was a bag left at the entrance to the Palais. The security staff called a bomb expert to check it out, and »

- Alex Ritman,Patrick Brzeski,Scott Roxborough

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‘Artist’ Director Michel Hazanavicius on His Return to Cannes With ‘Redoubtable’ About Jean-Luc Godard

18 May 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

After “The Artist” and “The Search,” French director Michel Hazanavicius is back at the Cannes Film Festival with “Redoubtable,” a comedy-laced romantic film chronicling the tumultuous relationship between iconic French director Jean-Luc Godard and Anne Wiazemsky, his wife from 1967-79, set against the backdrop of May 1968 riots in France.

The film, which toplines Louis Garrel (“Saint Laurent”), Stacy Martin (“Nymphomaniac: Vol. I”), Berenice Bejo (“The Past”) and Gregory Gadebois (“Angel & Tony”), is produced by Hazanavicius’ newly launched Paris-based production banner Les Compagnons du Cinema. StudioCanal will release the movie in France on Sept. 13 while Wild Bunch will be shopping the film in Cannes.

Rolling off a pair of successful spy comedies, “Oss 117: Lost in Rio” and “Oss 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies,” Hazanavicius broke through on the international scene with “The Artist,” a crowd-pleasing silent film, shot in black-and-white, about a struggling 1920s Hollywood star. The movie earned Jean Dujardin, »

- Elsa Keslassy

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'Redoubtable': Why Michel Hazanavicius Made a Movie About Jean-Luc Godard's Failed Marriage

18 May 2017 9:25 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

The last time Michel Hazanavicius directed an ode to cinema — the 2011 black-and-white silent film The Artist — he won five Oscars including best picture and director. With his latest film, Redoubtable, the French writer-director has upped the ante by tackling cinematic god Jean-Luc Godard.

Based on the book Un an après by Godard’s second wife, Anne Wiazemsky, the film kicks off in 1967, when the New Wave pioneer was shooting La Chinoise in Paris with the German actress, 20 years his junior. That film’s reception sparked an existential crisis for Godard, a somewhat relatable predicament for Hazanavicius. After »

- Tatiana Siegel

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Cannes 2017: 9 Hot Acquisition Titles That Will Have Buyers Chasing Foreign Films

16 May 2017 12:04 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

If you’re a buyer, the Cannes Film Festival isn’t where you go to catch a break. Including festival sidebars like Critics’ Week and Director’s Fortnight, there are more than 75 films at Cannes from all over the world — but when it comes to English-language movies, most are already spoken for.

Read More: The Cannes Film Festival Buyers Guide: Who’s Buying the Movies You’ll Watch

Netflix took the rights to Noah Baumbach’s family drama “The Meyerowitz Stories,” while Amazon has both Todd Haynes’ “Wonderstruck” and Sofia Coppola’s “The Beguiled.” A24 has never bought a completed film at Cannes, but the company is launching four titles at the fest, including Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” and the Safdie brothers’ “Good Time.”

What’s left are mainly foreign-language films from some of the most respected indie auteurs in world. Most of these filmmakers are »

- Graham Winfrey

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Variety Critics Share Their Cannes Cinematic Wish Lists

16 May 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Variety‘s chief film critics Peter Debruge and Owen Gleiberman look ahead at the Cannes festival lineup and tell us what they really want to see when the festival kicks off May 17.

Peter Debruge’s Picks

The Beguiled

It’s not like the world was asking for a remake of the 1971 Clint Eastwood classic, based on the Thomas Cullinan novel about a wounded Union soldier who bewitches an entire boarding school of lonely Confederate ladies — although now that it exists, consider me intrigued. Certainly, we can expect Sofia Coppola to repair the gender balance, which is the most backwards thing about director Don Siegel’s otherwise intoxicating testosterone-fueled fantasy.

The Florida Project

It’s about time Cannes took note of one of America’s most exciting indie voices, inviting “Tangerine” director Sean Baker into the fold. Apart from a general fascination with strange contemporary subcultures, and a capacity to translate »

- Peter Debruge and Owen Gleiberman

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Cannes 2017 Lineup is High On Auteur Intrigue, Low on Safe Awards Bets

13 May 2017 11:46 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ask just about any critic heading to next week’s Cannes Film Festival for their thoughts on the lineup and you’ll get much the same verdict: On paper, at least, it’s one of the tastiest in years. Usually we speak of Cannes programmes being “front-loaded” or “back-loaded” in terms of major auteur works; this year, it’s simply loaded.

The first two days of this year’s fest alone see premieres from Todd Haynes (“Wonderstruck”), Andrei Zvyagintsev (“Loveless”), Arnaud Desplechin (“Ismael’s Ghosts”) and Claire Denis (“Black Glasses”). The last two days, by which point the crowds usually thin out, have Lynne Ramsay (“You Were Never Really Here”) and Roman Polanski (“Based on a True Story”), not to mention David Lynch’s feverishly awaited “Twin Peaks” reboot.

In between is an all-you-can-eat cinephile’s buffet boasting new works from Michael Haneke (“Happy End”), Sofia Coppola (“The Beguiled”), Noah Baumbach »

- Guy Lodge

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Cannes 2017: watch trailers for the Official Selection films

13 May 2017 3:00 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Take a closer look at the films from the 70th Cannes Film Festival.

This page will be updated with trailers are they are released…

CompetitionLe Redoutable, Michel Hazanavicius

The Artist director tackles Jean-Luc Godard in this new film, following the French New Wave director as he falls in love with 17-year-old actress Anne Wiazemsky.

Watch on mobile Here.

The Day After, Hong Sangsoo

This film, which is one of two director Hong Sangsoo is premiering at Cannes, follows a woman who is mistaken for her boss’ lover as she begins a new job at a publishing company.

Watch on mobile Here.

Radiance, Naomi Kawase

A writer of film voiceovers for the visually impaired meets a photographer who is losing his eyesight at a film screening, and together they learn to see the radiant world that was previously invisible to them.

Watch on mobile Here.

L’Amant Double, François Ozon

A fragile woman falls in love and moves »

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“The reactions in Germany were better than in France” – Francois Ozon on WW1 drama Frantz

11 May 2017 6:23 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Stefan Pape

 

Given he’s one of our very favourite directors working today, it’s of great relief that Francois Ozon is such a prolific filmmaker, moving on from one project to the next in rapid fashion. This also means he releases a lot of films, which in turn, means we get to interview him a lot. Our latest meeting with the creative auteur was in Paris, to mark the release of Frantz…

So why the black and white aesthetic?

Actually the film was supposed to be shot in colour, but I decided one month before the shoot to change everything because after the location scouting, we found some very good places, especially in Germany, but it was full of colour, and I realised walking in the city, I saw some pictures of the place in black and white from the beginning of the century, and realised nothing had changed, »

- Stefan Pape

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

1-20 of 46 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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