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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

1-20 of 54 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


France submits Verhoeven’s 'Elle' to Oscar race

17 hours ago | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

First time France submits film by non-French national since 1977.

Dutch filmmaker Paul Verhoeven’s revenge thriller Elle will represent France as the country’s submission to the Best Foreign Language Film category at the 89th Academy Awards next year.

France’s National Cinema Centre (Cnc), which oversees the selection process, made the announcement on Monday (Sept 26).

Verhoeven’s French-language debut stars Isabelle Huppert as a video game company boss who seeks revenge on a brutal rapist.

The film generated considerable buzz at Cannes, where it world premiered in Competition, for its subject matter and Huppert’s strong performance.

Read: Paul Verhoeven talks returning to Cannes with ‘Elle

It is the first time France has submitted a film by a non-French national since Israeli director Moshé Mizrahi’s Madame Rosa, starring Simone Signoret as a retired prostitute, in 1977. It went on to win the Foreign Language category.

Verhoeven’s films have been submitted for the Foreign Language category »

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Great Job, Internet!: Bridget Jones’s Baby becomes a silent film in this dialogue-free trailer

8 September 2016 11:45 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Blame it on Al Jolson. Ever since that infernal crooner delivered the line “You ain’t heard nothin’ yet!” in 1927’s The Jazz Singer, audiences have demanded to hear actors speak in movies. The very next year, Mickey Mouse spoke in Steamboat Willie, and the era of the talkie had truly arrived. Displaced silent actress Norma Desmond (Gloria Swanson) would bemoan the situation in 1950’s Sunset Boulevard: “They had to have the ears of the whole world, too. So they opened their big mouths and out came talk, talk, talk!” The only silent films that have been made in recent decades have been deliberate throwbacks, like Michel Hazanavicius’ Oscar-winning The Artist. But maybe the silent movie, or at least the dialogue-free movie, has not yet breathed its last. On September 7, The Hollywood Reporter accidentally uploaded a wordless version of the trailer for the upcoming sequel Bridget Jones »

- Joe Blevins

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Toronto: Seven burning questions

5 September 2016 2:08 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

From The Birth Of A Nation to TWC, Screen reveals the key talking points.1. Has Toronto found an opening-night film that will get tongues wagging again?

After what might be described generously as a barren patch in the curtain-raising department since Looper kicked off proceedings in 2012, have artistic director Cameron Bailey and his team found the right weave of star power and spectacle again with the world premiere of Antoine Fuqua’s The Magnificent Seven? The western remake feels relevant in today’s uncertain times, boasts stupendous action sequences and features a diverse cast led by Fuqua regular Denzel Washington alongside Lee Byung-hun, Manuel Garcia-Rulfo and Martin Sensmeir. It’s popcorn with a message, but will the audience agree?

2. Can The Birth Of A Nation maintain its awards momentum?

Nate Parker’s slave-revolt drama had had tongues wagging all year, but now the conversation has taken a darker turn. Back in January, Fox Searchlight »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Louis Garrel Channels Jean-Luc Godard In First Pics From Michel Hazanavicius’ Romance ‘Redoubtable’

16 August 2016 12:05 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Legendary French New Wave director Jean-Luc Godard has created a legacy with masterpieces like “Breathless” and “A Women Is a Women.” Now, the helmer is becoming the subject of “The Artist” director Michel Hazanavicius’ romance drama “Redoubtable.” The project was announced back in May, and now the filmmaker has released a handful of new images from the project.

The film is based on Anne Wiazemsky’s autobiography, “Un An Après,” which chronicles the actress’ blossoming romance with Godard during the making of the 1967 film “La Chinoise.” The duo, who married shortly after, also collaborated on “Week End” and “Sympathy for the Devil” before divorcing in 1979. In the first pictures, “The Dreamers” actor Louis Garrel channels the iconic helmer, while “Nymphomaniac” actress Stacy Martin portrays Wiazemsky.

Read More: That Movie About Jean-Luc Godard’s Second Marriage is Misguided

Hazanavicius states in his Facebook post that he has always admired Godard’s »

- Liz Calvario

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Berenice Bejo, Stacy Martin, Louis Garrel Star in Hazanavicius’ ‘Redoutable’

15 August 2016 2:33 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paris — Michel Hazanavicius, the Oscar-winning director of “The Artist” and “The Search,” is set for “Le Redoutable,” a Paris-set comedy chronicling the tumultuous romance between iconic French director Jean-Luc Godard and Anne Wiazemsky set against the backdrop of May 1968 riots.

“Le Redoutable,” based on Wiazemsky’s book “Un an apres” (“One Year After”), stars Louis Garrel (“Saint Laurent”), Stacy Martin (“Nymphomaniac: Vol I”), Berenice Bejo (“The Past”) and Gregory Gadebois (“Angele et Tony”).

The movie, currently shooting in the French capital, marks the first project developed and produced by Les Compagnons du Cinema, a French outfit launched by Hazanavicius, Florence Gastaud, the managing director of the Arp (authors, directors and producers’ guild) and Riad Sattouf, the comicbook artist and director of “French Kissers.”

“Admiring deeply the work of Godard, and forever fascinated by this period of our history and its imagery, I absolutely wanted adapt this book into a comedy, »

- Elsa Keslassy

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First Look: Louis Garrel As Jean-Luc Godard In ‘The Artist’ Director Michel Hazanavicius’ ‘Redoubtable’

15 August 2016 11:18 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

From riding high thanks to “The Artist,” to sinking with his follow-up “The Search,” director Michel Hazanavicius is looking to rebound back to former glories with “Redoubtable.” And to do that, he’s once again trying to bring the cinematic past to life, only instead of spinning a fictional yarn, he’s going to tell a true […]

The post First Look: Louis Garrel As Jean-Luc Godard In ‘The Artist’ Director Michel Hazanavicius’ ‘Redoubtable’ appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Bérénice Bejo: ‘We cannot live with fear in our bodies’

11 August 2016 9:02 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Artist star tasted runaway success and then crashed to earth. Back with new film The Childhood of a Leader, she talks about France’s year of terror and why she married the ‘closest thing’ to her father

It is Bérénice Bejo’s day off, and she wants to get straight down to business. No sooner is she through the door of her agent’s office in Paris than she is steering me into one of the bright conference rooms, yanking out chairs for both of us and plonking her belongings on the table.

We have met to discuss The Childhood of a Leader, a brooding psychological drama directed by the young actor Brady Corbet, who Bejo says is “a little genius”. She plays a nameless, emotionally frigid mother in early-20th century France. While her American husband is helping to broker the Treaty of Versailles, their young son grows mysteriously malevolent. »

- Ryan Gilbey

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Up for Love review – French romcom falls short

7 August 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Oscar winner Jean Dujardin plays a vertically challenged lover in a comedy that constantly misfires

Jean Dujardin, the star of The Artist and possessor of the toothiest grin in cinema, is digitally reduced in size to 4ft 5ins as the romantic lead in this amiable but not altogether successful French romcom. He is Alexandre, a dazzlingly successful, well-connected architect who woos lawyer Diane (Virginie Efira) after she leaves her phone in a restaurant following an argument with her ex. They’re a perfect match. But can Diane see past her own prejudices and Alexandre’s underwhelming inside-leg measurement and accept that good things can come in small packages?

The vive la (height) difference message and the slightly earnest third act are undermined by a slapdash approach to consistency, both tonally and in terms of the digital manipulation of Dujardin’s height. A film that preaches acceptance should perhaps refrain from »

- Wendy Ide

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Up for Love review – short on laughs, but not without charm

4 August 2016 2:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Jean Dujardin does his best as a handsome 4ft 5in architect who falls for a beautiful lawyer, but this middling comedy is more silly than funny

French star Jean Dujardin created a global army of fans with his Oscar-winning performance in the 2011 smash The Artist – fans who wondered what he might do next. After cameos in The Wolf of Wall Street and Monuments Men, the answer seemed to be to show up for various middling films. Here is the latest, a French remake of an Argentinian comedy called Corazón de León. He plays Alexandre, a rich, handsome and brilliant architect who falls for beautiful lawyer Diane (Virginie Efira) after finding the mobile phone that she’d left behind in a restaurant after a blazing row with her obnoxious ex, Bruno, played by actor and noted director Cédric Kahn. But Alexandre is a person of restricted height, just 4ft 5in, which »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Film Guide: What Movie Should I Watch This Weekend? (July 22, 2016)

21 July 2016 11:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

To help sift through the increasing number of new releases (independent or otherwise), the Weekly Film Guide is here! Below you’ll find basic plot, personnel and cinema information for all of this week’s fresh offerings.

For July, we’ve also put together a list for the entire month. We’ve included this week’s list below, complete with information on screening locations for films in limited release.

See More: Here Are All the Upcoming Movies in Theaters for July 2016

Here are the films opening theatrically in the U.S. the week of Friday, July 22. All synopses provided by distributor unless listed otherwise.

Wide

Ice Age: Collision Course

Director: Galen T. Chu, Mike Thermeier

Cast: Adam DeVine, Jennifer Lopez, Melissa Rauch

Synopsis: Scrat’s epic pursuit of his elusive acorn catapults him outside of Earth, where he accidentally sets off a series of cosmic events that transform and threaten the planet. »

- Steve Greene

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Brady Corbet On His Directorial Debut ‘The Childhood of a Leader’ And The Problem With Movies Today

21 July 2016 9:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

First-time directors who swing for the fences with bold debut films can strike out hard, but actor-turned-director Brady Corbet’s “The Childhood of a Leader” is connecting in a big way.

The period drama premiered at last year’s Venice Film Festival, where Corbet took home the awards for Best Debut Feature and Best Director, and is being released Friday through IFC FilmsSundance Selects label. Corbet co-wrote the screenplay for the film with his partner Mona Fastvold.

Read More: ‘The Childhood Of A Leader’ Review: Brady Corbet’s Directorial Debut Is An Enthralling Mind-f*ck

A dark, post-World War I tale about the seven-year-old son of an American diplomat in France, the film’s largely European cast includes Bérénice Bejo (“The Artist”), Liam Cunningham (“Game of Thrones”) and Stacy Martin (“Nymphomaniac”). Robert Pattinson has a small but deceptively important role in the movie, which focuses on the young, manipulative »

- Graham Winfrey

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Review: The Childhood Of A Leader, Making of a Monster in Brady Corbet's Accomplished Directorial Debut

21 July 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

An allegorical tale set in the shadow of Wwi Europe, The Childhood of a Leader is a very accomplished first feature from 27 year-old American actor Brady Corbet. Considering his face has been showing up in the films of who's who in European arthouse cinema over the years -- Haneke, von Trier, Bonello, Assayas, Hansen-Løve, just to name a few -- this exclusively European production (UK/Hungary/France) seems far less surprising. The film sees an American diplomat (played by Liam Cunningham) working for President Woodrow Wilson to end the most horrific war that the world has ever experienced. His newly transplanted family consists of an educated, worldly wife (Berenice Bejo, The Artist, The Past) and an effeminate young son (the amazing Tom Sweet), complete with bobcut...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

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UK poster and trailer for The Childhood of a Leader

20 July 2016 2:20 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

With just a month to go until its release, a UK poster and trailer have arrived online for writer-director Brady Corbet’s upcoming mystery drama The Childhood of a Leader. Loosely based on the 1939 short story by Jean-Paul Sartre, the film marks the directorial debut of Corbet and features a cast that includes Robert Pattinson, Liam Cunningham and Bérénice Bejo; take a look below…

A child’s angelic face conceals a budding sociopath in the audacious, senses-shattering feature debut from actor Brady Corbet. A powerhouse international cast led by Robert Pattinson and Bérénice Bejo (The Artist) headlines this dark domestic nightmare. Set amidst the turmoil of World War I and its aftermath, it follows the young son of an American diplomat living in France as he learns to manipulate the adults around him—a monstrous coming of age that ominously parallels the rising tide of Fascism in Europe. A stylistically fearless tour-de-force, »

- Amie Cranswick

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Trailer for The Childhood of a Leader starring Robert Pattinson and Liam Cunningham

3 July 2016 2:30 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Ahead of its U.S. release later this month, a trailer has arrived online for director Brady Corbet’s upcoming directorial debut The Childhood of a Leader which stars Robert Pattinson, Liam Cunningham and Bérénice Bejo; take a look below after the official synopsis…

A child’s angelic face conceals a budding sociopath in the audacious, senses-shattering feature debut from actor Brady Corbet. A powerhouse international cast led by Robert Pattinson and Bérénice Bejo (The Artist) headlines this dark domestic nightmare. Set amidst the turmoil of World War I and its aftermath, it follows the young son of an American diplomat living in France as he learns to manipulate the adults around him—a monstrous coming of age that ominously parallels the rising tide of Fascism in Europe. A stylistically fearless tour-de-force, The Childhood of a Leader reaches fever-pitch delirium thanks to ravishing cinematography and a thunderous score by legendary, »

- Amie Cranswick

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Berenice Bejo To Star in Tom Shoval’s ‘Shake Your Cares Away’ (Exclusive)

30 June 2016 10:07 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paris — Berenice Bejo, who’s best-known for her roles in “The Past” and “The Artist,” is set to star in Israeli filmmaker Tom Shoval’s sophomore outing, “Shake Your Cares Away.”

Penned by Shoval with the collaboration of Oscar-winning writer/director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu (“Birdman”), “Shake Your Cares Away” turns on Alma, a young Israeli woman from a wealthy family who leads a double life as Dafna, an idealistic woman who volunteers in a soup kitchen in southern Tel Aviv.

Pic marks Shoval’s follow-up to Shoval’s “Youth,” which won three prizes at Jerusalem Film Festival, and earned nominations at the British Film Institute Awards, as well as nominations at London, Tokyo, Jerusalem, Cph Pix film festivals.

The project was first pitched at Les Arcs’s Coproduction Village in 2014.

“Shake Your Cares Away” will start shooting in early 2017 in Israel and in France.

One of France’s most sought-after actresses, »

- Elsa Keslassy

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U.S. Trailer For Brady Corbet’s Directorial Debut ‘The Childhood of a Leader’

29 June 2016 9:53 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Actor Brady Corbet is making his transition to the other side of the camera with his directorial debut The Childhood of a Leader, based on a screenplay he penned with writer Mona Fastvold. Corbet has assembled quite the cast for this blend of drama, horror, and mystery, with Robert Pattinson, Bérénice BejoLiam CunninghamStacy Martin, and newcomer Tom Sweet. With 45 Years cinematographer Lol Crawley and an original score by Scott Walker, all the pieces are in line for an impressive debut.

Demonstrating its filmic grain under an unsettling orchestral score and one messed up family dynamic, this new U.S. trailer suggests Corbet has a strong visual eye for the unflinching and a real promise in the director’s chair. We said in our review, “For all its showiness, Childhood remains fluid and subtle in depicting the uncomfortable side of family relationships – thus nailing the central point of Jean-Paul Sartre »

- Mike Mazzanti

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Top 10 Box Office Takeaways: Why ‘Finding Dory’ Sequel Drowned ‘Independence Day: Resurgence’

26 June 2016 3:42 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Like the rest of the summer, it’s a mixed bag.

The good news: this weekend’s top two films, one opener and one holdover, grossed nearly $115 million. That’s better than the top two last year (holdovers “Jurassic World” and “Inside Out”).

The bad news: while “Finding Dory” is a huge success, “Independence Day: Resurgence” is a dud that will likely fall like a rock from its underwhelming opening.

Buddy comedy “Central Intelligence” enjoyed a strong second weekend, and low-budget horror flick “The Shallows” scored a better-than-expected opening, buoyed by rave reviews. But Stx’s risky opening strategy failed for Gary Ross’s historic epic “Free State of Jones,” starring Matthew McConaughey. Another national release in under 800 theaters bombed. “The Neon Demon” and its sub-$1 million haul is covered in Arthouse Audit. (This week’s box office preview is here; last weekend’s Top 10 Box Office Takeaways is here. »

- Tom Brueggemann

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‘The Childhood Of A Leader’ Review: Brady Corbet’s Directorial Debut Is An Enthralling Mind-f*ck

14 June 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

A 27-year-old dude from Scottsdale, Arizona, Brady Corbet has somehow become the go-to guy for major European auteurs in need of a young American who can pick up what they’re putting down. We may never fully understand how he parlayed a one-episode cameo on “The King of Queens” and a recurring appearance in the fifth season of “24” into a series of brilliant collaborations with titans of international cinema like Michael Haneke (“Funny Games”) and Lars von Trier (“Melancholia”), but it’s clear why Corbet might have a special appreciation for how public figures are often seen through the lens of their beginnings. With his unusually accomplished directorial debut “Childhood of a Leader,” Corbet delivers a strange and startling film that reflects the unique trajectory of his career, as well as the influence of the iconoclastic directors with whom he’s already worked.

The first strains of Scott Walker’s panicky score slice into the soundtrack like Penderecki having a heart attack, the strings cutting into archival footage of World War I troops marching in formation. The opening titles are draped in terror, and they steel audiences for an ominous origin story on par with the horrors presaged by “Max” or “The Omen.” And on that promise, Corbet delivers — albeit it in his own elliptical, psychically tormented, and increasingly hypnotic way.

The Childhood of a Leader” tells the story of a young American boy (Tom Sweet) coming of age in a snowbound pocket of rural France circa 1918. His young yet severe mother (“The Artist” star Bérénice Bejo) is fed up with her son from the start, and takes out most of her frustration on the various employees who rear the boy for her by proxy. The child’s father (Liam Cunningham, who “Game of Thrones” fans will better recognize by the name of Davos Seaworth), is an assistant on President Wilson’s staff, and is often away in Versailles working on the peace treaty that would ultimately end the war. On the rare evenings during which he returns home, the boy’s father is sometimes accompanied by a widower politician played by Robert Pattinson (a glorified cameo during which he willfully melts into the musty furnishings of Corbet’s sets).

The film seldom ventures outside of the boy’s house, pushing deeper and deeper into the opaque void of its protagonist’s malleable young mind. Corbet’s doggedly anti-dramatic script (co-written by his partner, Mona Fastvold) stakes the boy’s future on a debate between nature vs. nurture in which neither side ever seems to earn a clear advantage. Sweet, whose character is outwardly defined by a blank expression and a head of flowing blond hair (he’s often confused for a girl), delivers a tense performance that often feels modeled after his director’s seething turns in “Simon Killer” and “Funny Games.” You almost never know what the kid is thinking, but it’s telling that his moments of paranoid anxiety are by far his most visceral — an early nightmare sequence suggests that Corbet has a natural talent for eerie visual abstractions.

Read More: Brady Corbet and Mona Fastvold Talk Moody Sundance Discovery ‘The Sleepwalker

He also has a natural talent for the strain of winking, comically exaggerated gravitas that makes it tempting to suspect that hyper-severe auteurs like Haneke and von Trier are actually just taking the piss. Ostentatiously divided into five sections (an overture, three ‘Tantrums,’ and a coda), and refusing to speak the boy’s name until late in the film (so that viewers might tie themselves into knots trying to work out which fascist leader the kid will grow up to become), “The Childhood of a Leader” pits the intensity of its context against the banality of its incident.

The first two Tantrums are all portent and no plot; the most exciting thing that happens is when the boy paws at the breast of his pretty young French tutor (“Nymphomaniac” ingenue Stacy Martin). There’s much talk of language skills, and fluency becomes its own kind of power, but how that factors into Corbet’s grand design is no better explicated than the fact that Sweet’s character is exclusively raised by hired help, or the tidbit that his dad had been hoping for a daughter. And yet, the raw anxiety of Corbet’s vision only grows more palpable as Sweet retreats further from our understanding; by the time the film reveals itself to be more of a mind-fuck than a historical drama, you’re too rattled to feel tricked.

On one hand, the indelibly disorienting final scene feels like a hit from behind; on the other, it feels as though the film has been building to it from the start. Either way, “The Childhood of a Leader” leaves behind a squall of unanswered questions that linger in the mind long after it squelches to a finish. Is this a story about the merits of Freudian psychology, or its limitations? Is it about the making of a monster, or is its distance meant to mock the thinking that sociopaths can be so easily explained? Early in the first Tantrum, Pattinson’s character lifts a quote that novelist John Fowles would ultimately coin in regards to the Holocaust: “That was the tragedy. Not that one man has the courage to be evil, but that so many have not the courage to be good.” Other than Corbet’s promise, that sentiment may be the film’s one clear takeaway: Whether born or raised, leaders are only as powerful as the people who neglect to stop them.

Grade: B+

The Childhood of a Leader” plays at BAMcinemaFest on June 23rd. It opens in theaters and on VOD on July 22nd.

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Related storiesReview: Ti West's 'In A Valley Of Violence' Is A Western 'John Wick,' But Mostly Shoots Blanks12 Must-See Films at BAMCinemaFest 2016'The Childhood of a Leader' Trailer: Robert Pattinson Toplines Brady Corbet's Period Directorial Debut »

- David Ehrlich

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Dakota Johnson, Michel Hazanavicius titles head to Italy

13 June 2016 5:04 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Rome-based distributor Cinema pre-bought six new titles at Cannes.

Italian distribution veteran Valerio De Paolis may have completed the sale of his company Bim to Wild Bunch two years ago but he shows no intention of retiring on the proceeds from the deal.

The distributor has announced a slew of Cannes acquisitions for his burgeoning Rome-based distribution label Cinema.

Pre-buys at Cannes included David Robert Mitchell’s La-set thriller Under The Silver Lake; Michel Hazanavicius’s 1960s-set Jean-Luc Godard tribute Redoubtable from Wild Bunch and Aki Kaurismaki’s The Other Side Of Hope from The Match Factory.

“I love »

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Dakota Johnson, Michel Hazanavicus titles head to Italy

13 June 2016 5:04 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Rome-based distributor Cinema pre-bought six new titles at Cannes.

Italian distribution veteran Valerio De Paolis may have completed the sale of his company Bim to Wild Bunch two years ago but he shows no intention of retiring on the proceeds from the deal.

The distributor has announced a slew of Cannes acquisitions for his burgeoning Rome-based distribution label Cinema.

Pre-buys at Cannes included David Robert Mitchell’s La-set thriller Under The Silver Lake; Michel Hazanavicius’s 1960s-set Jean-Luc Godard tribute Redoubtable from Wild Bunch and Aki Kaurismaki’s The Other Side Of Hope from The Match Factory.

“I love »

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

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