223 user 388 critic

My Week with Marilyn (2011)

2:01 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $3.99 (HD) on Prime Video

Colin Clark, an employee of Sir Laurence Olivier's, documents the tense interaction between Olivier and Marilyn Monroe during the production of The Prince and the Showgirl (1957).



(screenplay), (books)
2,476 ( 743)
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 19 wins & 59 nominations. See more awards »





Cast overview, first billed only:
Sir Kenneth Clark
Hugh Perceval
Jack Cardiff
Robert Portal ...
David Orton


Sir Laurence Olivier is making a movie in London. Young Colin Clark, an eager film student, wants to be involved and he navigates himself a job on the set. When film star Marilyn Monroe arrives for the start of shooting, all of London is excited to see the blonde bombshell, while Olivier is struggling to meet her many demands and acting ineptness, and Colin is intrigued by her. Colin's intrigue is met when Marilyn invites him into her inner world where she struggles with her fame, her beauty and her desire to be a great actress. Written by napierslogs

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Biography | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:







Release Date:

23 December 2011 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Mi semana con Marilyn  »


Box Office


£6,400,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,750,507, 18 November 2011, Limited Release

Gross USA:


Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs


Sound Mix:



Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See  »

Did You Know?


The notebook that Arthur Miller wrote and that Marilyn was seen crying over is most likely his initial draft of his play "After the Fall", which features a character that was a parody of Monroe. The play remains one of Miller's most unpopular works. See more »


In addition to the continuity error about the anamorphic lens seen in the preview theatre two different versions of the rushes are shown in that scene. When Olivier and Vivien Leigh are watching they are looking at a very wide cinemascopic version but, when it cuts to a different angle as they stand up to leave, the image is more of a 16:9 ratio. See more »


[first lines]
Title Card: In 1956, at the height of her career, Marilyn Monroe went to England to make a film with Sir Laurence Olivier. While there she met a young man named Colin Clark, who wrote a diary about the making of the film. This is their true story.
See more »


References Bus Stop (1956) See more »


Autumn Leaves
(Les Feuilles Mortes)
Music by Joseph Kosma
French lyrics by Jacques Prévert
English lyrics by Johnny Mercer
Performed by Nat 'King' Cole (as Nat King Cole)
Licensed courtesy of EMI Records Ltd
Published by EMI Music Publishing Ltd
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »

User Reviews

24 November 2011 | by See all my reviews

I had really looked forward to seeing this and was prepared to be knocked out by Michelle Williams.

She remains a terrific favorite of mine as modern actresses go, but there were some essential things that either she or the director got wrong.

Mainly she misses the bigger-than-life aura that movie stars have to have. Her gritty indie acting is terrific and she works hard to get the emotions and make a real character. She goes for all of that in this role, but the script is so expository and contrived (with bits and pieces from other sources that are thrown in to make sure we get it).

Her radiance seems so dim in comparison to what Monroe could truly turn on. The stark contrast between the giggles and the tears was never convincing via Williams. The wallowing, self-pitying Marilyn with a streak of manipulation comes off just okay, but becomes tedious with the repetitive and slow script. In the scenes where she is being lionized by fans, her consumption of the adulation is a poor shadow show.

Branagh is terrific. Dench dynamite as Dame Sybil. But the pace and heaviness of the direction diminish their efforts. And why would Olivier be mouthing dialogue from "The Entertainer" during the making of "Prince and the Showgirl" (The "dead behind these eyes" bit)? The filmmakers really underestimate the audience. The actors playing Milton Greene and Arthur Miller make such wretched attempts at American accents, that I won't even call them out by name.

Now to Julia Ormond. Phoned in. She's not central to the story and makes rare appearances, but again, lacks the movie star command that Vivien Leigh knew precisely. When she walks in for a visit on the set, she doesn't bring the inner radiance that makes everyone treat her like royalty--a hallmark trait of Vivien Leigh. Additionally, her final confrontation with Olivier lacked the meanness and anger and resentment that Leigh had become used to verbally stabbing poor Larry with.

It is to appreciate that someone takes these acting icons and tries to show us real people--but to not direct them to give us the spark that makes these stars interesting even still, is inexcusable and, ultimately, dull filmmaking.

In the end, what could have been a delicious look into the paper persons of icons, becomes a meandering and shallow exercise in pointlessness.

92 of 175 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 223 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

15 Most Bingeable TV Shows

"The IMDb Show" presents the 15 most bingeable TV shows of all time, featuring "Rick and Morty," "The Office," and "Lost."

Watch now