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My Week with Marilyn (2011)

Trailer
2:01 | Trailer

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ON DISC
Colin Clark, an employee of Sir Laurence Olivier's, documents the tense interaction between Olivier and Marilyn Monroe during the production of The Prince and the Showgirl (1957).

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (books)
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Popularity
3,819 ( 375)
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 19 wins & 59 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Sir Kenneth Clark
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Hugh Perceval
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Vanessa
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Jack Cardiff
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Cotes-Preedy
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David Orton
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Barry
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Andy
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Storyline

Sir Laurence Olivier is making a movie in London. Young Colin Clark, an eager film student, wants to be involved and he navigates himself a job on the set. When film star Marilyn Monroe arrives for the start of shooting, all of London is excited to see the blonde bombshell, while Olivier is struggling to meet her many demands and acting ineptness, and Colin is intrigued by her. Colin's intrigue is met when Marilyn invites him into her inner world where she struggles with her fame, her beauty and her desire to be a great actress. Written by napierslogs

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

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Language:

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Release Date:

23 December 2011 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Mi semana con Marilyn  »

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Box Office

Budget:

£6,400,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,750,507, 18 November 2011, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$14,600,347

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$35,057,696
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Kenneth Branagh's and Emma Watson's first movie together since Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (2002). See more »

Goofs

Greene tells Colin that he's known Marilyn for seven years. Greene and Marilyn met for the first time in 1953 when he shot her on assignment for Look Magazine, three years before the movie takes place. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Title Card: In 1956, at the height of her career, Marilyn Monroe went to England to make a film with Sir Laurence Olivier. While there she met a young man named Colin Clark, who wrote a diary about the making of the film. This is their true story.
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Soundtracks

Uno Dos Tres
Performed by La Tropicana Orchestra
Written by Daniel Indart, Jesus 'El Nino' Alejandro (as Jesus A. Perez-Alvarez)
Published by Indart Music
License courtesy of LMS Records
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Total Pleasure
2 April 2013 | by See all my reviews

What else can I add to so many fabulous reviews and make it interesting and different? Nothing really. But I want to, at least, contribute my opinion about this mesmerizing movie experience. Michelle Williams was for sure an Absolute Master capturing the essence of Marilyn and if we don't compare them next to each other, we could perfectly well accept that SHE WAS Marilyn, the symbiosis was TOTAL.

The movie is flawless in its development from the beginning of an inconsequential shooting routine schedule to the point where we are so involved and in love with the protagonist that we too would like to be in that bed next to her, embracing her and convincing her that her world isn't that bad after all.

There are many MAGIC moments and some of them moving you to tears, tears of empathy with that lonely girl in a frightening position that practically no one could carry successfully without paying a high price for it, as she eventually did too.

Great film, sublime film, from beginning to end. Flawless. Thank you to every one involved in this project, one of my favorites any time.


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