You All Are Captains (2010) - News Poster

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New to Streaming: ‘A Ghost Story,’ ‘Carol,’ ‘The Death of Louis Xiv,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Carol (Todd Haynes)

From the first note of Carter Burwell‘s magnificent score and opening shot of Edward Lachman’s ravishing cinematography — introducing a Brief Encounter-esque opening bookend — Todd Haynes transports one to an intoxicating world of first love and its requisite heartbreak. Carol excels at being many things: a romantic drama; a coming-of-age story; an exploration of family dynamics and social constructs of the time; an acting
See full article at The Film Stage »

Oliver Laxe In Front and Behind the Camera

  • MUBI
Ben Rivers' The Sky Trembles and the Earth Is Afraid and the Two Eyes Are Not Brothers (2015) is showing on Mubi from September 6 - October 6 and Oliver Laxe's Mimosas (2016) from September 7 - October 7, 2017 in the United Kingdom as part of the series Close-Up on Oliver Laxe.MimosasBoth Mimosas and The Sky Trembles and the Earth Is Afraid and the Two Eyes Are Not Brothers mirror each other in many different ways: they both take place in the same geographical space, the south of Morocco, they were filmed at the same time, have some of the same people in them, and are filmed in 16mm. But these are only apparent similarities that veil deeper discussions between both films. Director Oliver Laxe stands behind the camera in Mimosas, he is observed from the distance in the first part of The Sky Trembles, and finally ends up crossing the invisible wall
See full article at MUBI »

Fslc Announce Shorts Programs And New Section Explorations For 54th New York Film Festival

Fslc Announce Shorts Programs And New Section Explorations For 54th New York Film Festival
The Film Society of Lincoln Center today announced the lineup for Explorations, a new section featuring bold selections from the vanguard of contemporary cinema, and Main Slate shorts for the 54th New York Film Festival.

Read More: Nyff Reveals Main Slate of 2016 Titles, Including ‘Manchester By the Sea,’ ‘Paterson’ and ‘Personal Shopper’

Explorations is devoted to work from around the world, from filmmakers across the spectrum of experience and artistic sensibility. It kicks off with six features, including Albert Serra’s latest, “The Death of Louis Xiv,” featuring a tour de force performance by French cinema legend Jean-Pierre Léaud; Douglas Gordon’s portrait of avant-garde icon Jonas Mekas, “I Had Nowhere to Go”; João Pedro Rodrigues’s “The Ornithologist”, which won him the Best Director prize at Locarno; as well as Natalia Almada’s “Everything Else”, Gastón Solnicki’s “Kékszakállú,” and Oliver Laxe’s “Mimosas.”

New York Film Festival Director
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes winner 'Mimosas' gets Us deal

Fledgling NY outfit Grasshopper Film has taken rights to Oliver Laxe’s Morocco-set Western.

New York-based Grasshopper Film has acquired Us rights to Oliver Laxe’s Cannes-winning film Mimosas.

The Arabic language Western, which won the Critics Week Grand Prize at Cannes in May, follows a caravan carrying a dying sheikh who wished to be buried with his loved ones in the Moroccan Atlas Mountains.

The Us deal was negotiated by Ryan Krivoshey, founder and president of Grasshopper Film, with Fiorella Moretti of Paris-based sales agent Luxbox.

Krivoshey commented: “Mimosas is an enigmatic, gorgeous work that will enthrall audiences around the country, much as it did in Cannes. We are extremely excited to be working with Oliver, Fiorella, and the entire Luxbox team on this release.”

Laxe’s feature debut You All Are Captains premiered at Cannes in 2010, winning the Firpresci prize.

Launched earlier this year, Grasshopper Film’s upcoming slate includes Laura Israel’s documentary Don’t Blink
See full article at ScreenDaily »

[Cannes Review] Mimosas

A “religious western” is how Moroccan-based Spanish director Oliver Laxe describes his second film Mimosas, winner of the top prize at Cannes’ Critics’ Week. It’s a spiritual, ambiguously-plotted journey through the Atlas Mountains, but those willing to give in to its mystical embrace and gorgeous visuals should find it an sensual, engrossing watch.

There’s spiritualism from the opening scenes: deep in the Moroccan mountains, a group of nomadic travelers are being led to the ancient city of Sijilmasa by their wizened old sheik, a dying man who wants to be buried in his home town. Crossing the Atlas is treacherous, and some in the caravan object, but faith in their leader among the rest carries them through.

The film cuts to what seems like another world – a bustling city, where Shakib (an eminently watchable Shakib Ben Omar) extolls a Quranic tale of the devil in the garden of Eden.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Mimosas’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Mimosas’
Mimosas,” the second feature from Morocco-based director Oliver Laxe, won the Nespresso Grand Prize at this year’s Cannes Critics’ Week, and Nespresso isn’t a terrible idea for anyone who walks in without preparation for this minimalist travelogue and crypto-Western, which offers relatively few clues to its goals and intents. Still, those familiar with the ethnographic works of Ben Rivers (who gets a thanks in the closing credits) and the films of Argentine director Lisandro Alonso (“Jauja”) will find much to admire in the movie’s combination of spiritual musings and stunning landscapes. Favoring longueurs by design, it is a decidedly noncommercial project that asks to be taken or left on its own terms.

Laxe’s first feature, “You All Are Captains” (which showed in Directors’ Fortnight in 2010), combined fiction and documentary elements, and he has said that “Mimosas” was inspired by his own travels with Saïd Aagli, who
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Mimosas’ Wins Cannes Critics’ Week Grand Prize

‘Mimosas’ Wins Cannes Critics’ Week Grand Prize
Cannes — Oliver Laxe’s sophomore outing “Mimosas” has won the Nespresso Grand Prize of Cannes’ Critics Week.

Critics’ Week, whose artistic director is Charles Tesson, had a jury presided by Valerie Donzelli (“Declaration of War”) and comprising Alice Winocour, Nadav Lapid, David Robert Mitchell and Santiago Mitre — all of whom are Critics’ Week alumni.

Sold by Paris-based Luxbox, the lushly-lensed “Mimosas” follows the journey of an elderly and dying Sheikh who travels across the Moroccan Atlas in a caravan, escorted by two rogues. Laxe made his debut feature with the critically-acclaimed “You All Are Captains.”

Mehmet Can Mertoğlu’s Turkish comedy “Album” won the France 4 Visionary Award, while Davy Chou and Claire Maugendre’s narrative feature debut “Diamond Island” nabbed the Sacd prize.

“Album” centers on a couple who stages a pregnancy to pretend that the child they’re looking to adopt is theirs. The social satire delivers a snapshot
See full article at Variety - Film News »

“It’s Good For You To Experience Disasters”: Oliver Laxe on His Forthcoming Feature Las Mimosas

Currently in post-production, Oliver Laxe’s second feature, Las Mimosas, is an ambitious follow-up to his critically acclaimed debut feature, You All Are Captains. Shot in Morocco, where the French-born Spaniard has lived for the best part of a decade, the film has been four years in the making. Produced by Zeitun Films and co-financed by Rouge International (France) and Laprod (Morocco), Laxe’s sophomore feature also received support from several funding schemes at film festivals, including Torino FilmLab and Cph:Forum. With Zeitun Films aiming to unveil the film at another major festival in 2016 (Captains debuted at Cannes in 2010), footage […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

“It’s Good For You To Experience Disasters”: Oliver Laxe on His Forthcoming Feature Las Mimosas

Currently in post-production, Oliver Laxe’s second feature, Las Mimosas, is an ambitious follow-up to his critically acclaimed debut feature, You All Are Captains. Shot in Morocco, where the French-born Spaniard has lived for the best part of a decade, the film has been four years in the making. Produced by Zeitun Films and co-financed by Rouge International (France) and Laprod (Morocco), Laxe’s sophomore feature also received support from several funding schemes at film festivals, including Torino FilmLab and Cph:Forum. With Zeitun Films aiming to unveil the film at another major festival in 2016 (Captains debuted at Cannes in 2010), footage […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Oliver Laxe's "You All Are Captains"

  • MUBI
"We All Are Captains…" reads the headline at the top of Andrew Schenker's entry at his Cine File today, followed by "…in the exciting world of film criticism, but some are more so, thanks to the weight of institutional authority. Such is the case with one of the most embarrassing movie reviews I've ever read, David DeWitt's inane take on Oliver Laxe's You All Are Captains for the New York Times, which, among its other sins, seems not to understand the work in question one jot." Others, evidently, would second that reading.

Andrew Schenker's own review appears in Slant: "Laxe goes full-on meta by casting himself in the role of a visiting moviemaker who travels to Morocco to shoot footage with disadvantaged children living in a shelter. Arrogant, unresponsive to the needs of the kids, 'Oliver' neglects his educational mission in favor of using the children for his own somewhat mysterious cinematic ends…
See full article at MUBI »

2011 Migrating Forms: Closing Night Tonight!

Tonight marks the end of the 3rd annual Migrating Forms experimental media festival in NYC at the Anthology Film Archives. Films run all afternoon and evening, concluding with the meta-documentary You Are All Captains directed by Oliver Laxe. If you’re in NYC today, go check it out!

Richard Brody gave a glowing review of the film for the New Yorker, as did Lexie Delaney for VoxTalk.

The full lineup of films screening at Migrating Forms today is below. If you check out some films today, why don’t you come back here and leave a comment below about what you saw!

May 29

1:30 p.m.: “Group Program 8″

A Movie, dir. Jennifer Proctor

Coming Attractions, dir. Peter Tscherkassky

Despair, dir. Stephen Sutcliffe

Misty Suite, dir. James Richards

These Hammers Don’t Hurt Us, dir. Michael Robinson

3:15 p.m.: “Group Program 9 ”

Brune Renault, dir. Neil Beloufa

Rosalinda, dir.
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

2011 Migrating Forms: Official Lineup

The 3rd annual Migrating Forms is set to run on May 20-29 at the Anthology Film Archives with yet another stunning lineup of current and classic experimental and avant-garde films and videos.

New work includes the U.S. premiere of Melanie Gilligan’s experimental sci-fi feature Popular Unrest for the fest’s Opening Night event. Then, throughout the fest, will be Jacqueline Goss‘ meteorology meditation The Observers, Liu Jiayin’s two-part family drama Oxhide and Oxhide II, Madison Brookshire’s light processing experimentation Color Series, Oliver Laxe’s meta-documentary You Are All Captains for the Closing Night event, and more.

New short works in the group programs include films and videos by Adele Horne, Andrew Lampert, Kevin Jerome Everson, Shana Moulton, Fern Silva, Olga Chernysheva, Dani Leventhal and more.

Classic retrospectives include Brazilian films by Glauber Rocha and French films written by Georges Perec. Electric Arts Intermix presents little-seen personal videos by L.
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Migrating Forms 3. Lineup

Migrating Forms has just revealed the full program for its third edition, running May 20 through 29 at Anthology Film Archives in New York. And it's pretty impressive, so we're going to go the quickest route here and reproduce the release below the jump.

Special Events

Georges Perec Double Bill

Serie Noire Dir Alain Corneau (1979)

Georges Perec wrote dialogue made up almost entirely of cliches and aphorisms for this adaptation of Jim Thompson's A Hell of a Woman. "The only Thompson adaptation to truly express the author's deeply personal darkness." - Moving Image Source

Un homme qui dort (The Man Who Slept) Dir. Georges Perec and Bernard Queysanne (1974)

Adapted from Georges Perec's novel of the same name. Structured as a filmic sestina, Perec and Queysanne reimagine the framework of the novel while maintaining much of the original narration (read by Shelly Duvall in the English version!).

The Art of the
See full article at MUBI »

See also

Showtimes | External Sites