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Inside Job (2010)

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Takes a closer look at what brought about the 2008 financial meltdown.

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Won 1 Oscar. Another 7 wins & 26 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Himself - Narrator (voice)
...
Himself - Professor of Economics, University of Iceland
...
Himself - Writer & Filmmaker
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Herself - Special Investigative Committee, Icelandic Parliament
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Himself - Former Federal Reserve Chairman
...
Himself - Managing Director, International Monetary Fund
...
Himself - Chairman, Soros Fund Management
...
Himself - Chairman, Financial Services Committee
...
Himself - Under Secretary of the Treasury, Bush Administration
...
Himself - Chief Lobbyist, Financial Services Roundtable
...
Himself - Chief Adviser, China Banking Regulatory Commission
...
Himself - Prime Minister, Singapore
...
Herself - Finance Minister, France
...
Herself - U.S. Managing Editor, The Financial Times
...
Himself - Professor, NYU Business School
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Storyline

'Inside Job' provides a comprehensive analysis of the global financial crisis of 2008, which at a cost over $20 trillion, caused millions of people to lose their jobs and homes in the worst recession since the Great Depression, and nearly resulted in a global financial collapse. Through exhaustive research and extensive interviews with key financial insiders, politicians, journalists, and academics, the film traces the rise of a rogue industry which has corrupted politics, regulation, and academia. It was made on location in the United States, Iceland, England, France, Singapore, and China. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The global economic crisis of 2008 cost tens of millions of people their savings, their jobs, and their homes. This is how it happened. See more »

Genres:

Documentary | Crime

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some drug and sex-related material | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

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Country:

Language:

Release Date:

12 November 2010 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Trabajo confidencial  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$39,649 (USA) (10 October 2010)

Gross:

$4,312,735 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| |

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

On being interviewed about this film, Henry Rollins likened Charles Ferguson's interviewing technique to "tightening the screws little by little until the interviewee starts to say "Ow.....ow.....ow and then, Stop the camera!" See more »

Goofs

The first time Dominique Strauss-Khan's name is shown, it is misspelled. 'Dominique' is written 'Dominque', and 'Strauss-Kahn' is written 'Straus-Kahn'. See more »

Quotes

Narrator: Inequality of wealth in the United States is now higher than in any other developed country.
See more »

Connections

Featured in 50 Documentaries to See Before You Die: Episode 2 (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Takin' Care of Business
Written by Randy Bachman
Performed by Bachman-Turner Overdrive
Courtesy of The Island Def Jam Music Group
Under license from Universal Music Enterprises
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User Reviews

 
Jerks and Suckers
29 November 2010 | by (San Francisco) – See all my reviews

It was the last thing I wanted to see as the holiday Season sets off: A documentary explaining the World wide economic depression. But it was probably something I should have put before, say, "Burlesque." This is a serious film that has no particular political axe to grind in terms of "Republican" vs. "Democrat" since each successive administration beginning with Ronald Reagan is thrashed for bowing down to Wall Street rather than protecting American citizens from the most immoral graft and greed, that I can remember in my 60 years as a U.S. Citizen. While it's true that "deregulation" is the hue and cry of one particular political party, what occurs with investment and banking firms is so entwined with our national representatives, that it does no good whatsoever to point fingers at one party.

The film opens with the simplest explanation of the impact of investment banking firms in the tiny country of Iceland. When investors move in and create a financial "bubble" for the sole purpose of letting it burst while taking off with enormous profits for themselves, the opening credits then start and introduce us to the players who would come to power with Reagan (Volker and Greenspan) and remove restrictions that had been put in place—we should all remember for good reason; regulations were set up because people had abused an open market—we see the rise and fall of the U.S. economy which became based on nothing but investment since all our "production" had been poorly managed and sent abroad, i.e. steel, automobiles, etc. What was left was goods and services and a tiny, though prosperous, "information technology." When Reagan gutted regulation and regulatory agencies, a system of credit developed where finance agencies sold risky loans to entities, and at the same time "bet" on those loans to fail, setting up a situation that the more risky the loan, the bigger the profit for lender. Various "talking heads" and bar graphs come across the screen, and they're all helpful in explaining what happened. But it's the deeply amoral points of view that get stated by people who were or are still in control of the financial banks and markets of this country that really appall.

And we're left with a sense of outrage and not more than a little sense of futility because there's nowhere to go for either compensation or redress. At the end of the film "Fair Game" about another kind of government takeover, we're given a civic's speech about how the country belongs to the people and it's up to us to make it work. Here, in "Inside Job" there's nothing anyone can do. We elected a president who was sent to prevent the problem from happening again, but instead he appoints many of the same people who set up the situation and profited from the first round.

I didn't find the small section of the film describing the "type A" personality of the players involved who use prostitutes and drugs to be either relevant or convincing. We see a former call girl allude to many in the financial world, but so what? There's a small dig at Elliot Spitzer, but he offers it himself. As well, we're given a psychiatrist who "can't reveal names" but can say for certain many in the financial industry are addicted to drugs and prostitutes, but so are many outside that world. It came across as a cheap shot in a film that brings forward many significant players (and names many who refused to appear in the film) and exposes them for what they are. They need no further tarnishing.

I did see one area that could be addressed as a beginning of reform. Various economic professors who are brought from institutions of higher learning to "advise" the government and then return to their teaching jobs aren't—for baffling reasons—prohibited from making profit off the policies they recommend. That needs to be stopped. In most disciplines, university professors can't use their research and publications for personal gain. Those in the field of economics need the same kinds of restrictions. And students should demand it.

We should all demand a lot more than we're getting from our government, but I guess we hope we're going to be one of the few to reap those enormous profits (which is a real sucker's bet). It's baffling and infuriating to watch this film and walk out into the light of day where the practices on display are still going on.


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