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The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (2015) Poster

Trivia

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Napoleon Solo's trick of removing a tablecloth from a table while leaving all the objects undisturbed was not a visual effect. Henry Cavill actually performed it himself, having trained in the trick from British variety star Mat Ricardo.
Henry Cavill and Armie Hammer often did their own stunts in the film. Hammer was more enthusiastic about his stunts; his stunt double joked that he "hardly has a chance to do anything because he's out there doing it all by himself."
Henry Cavill admitted that he was very relieved to not have a shirtless scene in this movie after a string of movies where he had to be in top shape. Cavill said that he was glad to focus on his performance for once and not his physique, which he said took an enormous amount of work to present on screen.
One of the reasons the film stayed in the 60s time period was to allow them "to have our own world, our own reality, our own tone, which sets us apart" from films like the Bourne franchise and other recent spy thrillers.
Tom Cruise was cast as Napoleon Solo but chose to focus instead on Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation (2015), so he dropped out. Henry Cavill, who was at first considered for the other role, was cast. Henry Cavill is now starring in the new Mission Impossible movie alongside Tom Cruise.
The TV series The Man From U.N.C.L.E. (1964-1968) was partially developed by Ian Fleming, the creator of James Bond; Napoleon Solo had started out as a character in Fleming's novel "Goldfinger." In homage, Alexander Waverly, in this film, is a Commander in the British Naval Intelligence, the same rank that James Bond holds.
Armie Hammer watched The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (1964) before starting production to prepare for his role as Ilya Kuryakin. He was the only member of the cast to do so.
Armie Hammer confessed to being awed by co-star Henry Cavill on first meeting him. Hammer re-called, "I was overwhelmed by his good looks, his chiseled body, his muscles, pretty much everything. There was the whole package there."
The only principal cast members to use their natural accents in the film were English actor Hugh Grant and German actor Sylvester Groth.
The movie takes place a year or two after the Cuban Missile Crisis, an origin story that the TV show The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (1964) never explained. Presenting the origin story was one of the reasons director, producer & co-screenwriter Guy Ritchie and producer & co-screenwriter Lionel Wigram wanted to do the project.
Kuryakin bickers with Solo over how Gaby should be dressed. This refers to The Return of the Man from U.N.C.L.E.: The Fifteen Years Later Affair (1983), where Kuryakin took up high-fashion designing after leaving UNCLE.
The hydrogen bomb builder's name is Udo Teller, close to the name of the real scientist Edward Teller, who was called the "Father of the Hydrogen Bomb." However, Edward Teller did not work for the Nazis, but, being a Hungarian Jew, fled to America and worked on the Manhattan Project.
The suits that Henry Cavill wears as Napoleon Solo were created bespoke by renowned British tailor Timothy Everest, who has also worked on the James Bond and Mission: Impossible film franchises. Solo's suits feature unique details such as covered buttons and squared-off front edges that were referenced from the late 1960s. During one of his costume fittings at Everest's shop, Henry Cavill accidentally broke the change room door off its hinges. The staff kept it as a memento of the time that "Superman" broke their door.
The main antagonists' last name is Vinciguerra. This is a portmanteau of the Italian phrase "vinci guerra" ("win war").
Warner Bros. had been trying to adapt The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (1964-1968) for over a decade; it was a project that could not get the green light.
Guy Ritchie looked at films like Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) for inspiration, trying to create a juxtaposition between humor and serious and looking to "cross genres to a degree."
Some of the costumes in the film are actually vintage clothing.
U.N.C.L.E. is an acronym for "United Network Command for Law and Enforcement." In Latin-American countries, it was changed to C.I.P.O.L., standing this time for "Comisión Internacional Para la Observancia de la Ley" (International Commission for the Observance of the Law).
Dialogue changed during the shooting of the film and improvisation was involved. When it came to the dialogue, Henry Cavill said, "Some days they stay exactly as they are, and other days they change completely, and that's quite refreshing."
In the car chase scene, Kuryakin is driving a modified Trabant automobile. The Trabant has a reputation for being a shoddily built and underpowered East German car.
Lionel Wigram says one of the reasons Italy was a location in the film is because of the world of La Dolce Vita (1960), the world of Federico Fellini, and the world of Michelangelo Antonioni. He said they "thought that was just a very sexy, fun, glamorous time."
David Beckham makes a cameo appearance in the movie as the projectionist at the beginning of the movie, when Illya is being briefed about Solo.
When Kuryakin is waiting outside of the hotel, there is an Exacta SLR on the roof of his car. The Exacta was made in Dresden, East Germany, and would be an appropriate camera for a Soviet spy.
George Clooney was originally cast as Napoleon Solo but dropped out due to health problems.
Joel Edgerton and Henry Cavill auditioned for the role of Illya Kuryakin.
Steven Soderbergh was originally going to direct but exited the project over disagreements with the studio over budget and casting concerns.
The Rome racetrack was actually filmed at Goodwood race track in England.
Armie Hammer was considered for the role of Clark Kent/Superman in Man of Steel (2013), but that role went to Henry Cavill. He was later considered for the role of Bruce Wayne/Batman in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016), but it went to Cavill's co-star Ben Affleck.
In the television series The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (1964), American agent Napoleon Solo is played by American actor Robert Vaughn, and Russian agent Illya Kuryakin is played by UK actor David McCallum (from Scotland). In the movie, it is the reverse: Solo is played by UK actor Henry Cavill (resident of England) and Kuryakin is played by American actor Armie Hammer.
The code name used by the studio for covertly shipping copies of the film to theaters was "Waterloo."
Producer and co-screenwriter Lionel Wigram said of this movie: "One of the ways we put our own spin on it was by making it an origin story about how U.N.C.L.E. was formed. In the series, U.N.C.L.E. already existed. So in the midst of the Cold War you had the CIA and KGB secretly teaming for the greater good at a time when East-West relations were at their absolute worst. How did such an alliance come about?"
In the scene where the Contessa says that she is on a diet "of caviar and champagne", the caviar is scooped onto a toast with a silver spoon. Some caviar enthusiasts believe that metal can alter the taste of fine caviar, and that mother of pearl is the preferred material for scooping caviar, especially if indulging from the spoon directly. However, as caviar is shipped in metal tins this is also considered a myth by many.
The avocado standing rotary phone used by the character, Victoria Vinciguerra in her office, is an Ericofon. Created by the Ericsson Company, this phone began open market production in 1956 for Europe and Australia. In the United States, the Bell Company did not permit the use of third-party equipment, so the Ericofon could only be used by independent telephone companies in the US.
This is Guy Ritchie's first film shot entirely on digital cameras.
Gemma Arterton, Alice Eve, Mia Wasikowska, Emilia Clarke, Felicity Jones, Teresa Palmer and Sarah Gadon all auditioned for the role of Gaby Teller which in the end was cast with actress Alicia Vikander.
The movie was shot in the longest soundstage in London.
Actress Alicia Vikander said of this movie: "It's a great feeling knowing that, together, you've gone beyond what was originally on the page. You get to know your character better because you're not only thinking about what they say, but about what they might say." Actor Henry Cavill, for whom working with director Guy Ritchie was the number one reason he signed onto the project, concurred: "His movies are fantastic and his filmmaking style is unique. There's no over-rehearsing, so you can get in there and do it, and it feels very fresh and new when you shoot." Actor Armie Hammer added: "It really keeps you sharp. You have to do your homework and show up ready for anything because things can change," who likewise jumped at the chance to work with the acclaimed director. "I think he intentionally keeps the atmosphere light because you get the best work when everyone is free and everything is flowing. It's an open, inviting, creative space and that's what Guy tries to cultivate on the set."
Hugh Grant was cast as the debonair and unflappable Waverly, the only other familiar character from the series apart from Napoleon Solo and Ilya Kuryakin. Grant warmed to the script. With characteristic humor, he said: "I've always liked Guy's [Guy Ritchie's] films and thought they were quite hip, and I'm not sure I've ever done anything even remotely hip, so that was part of the appeal. Plus, I have an uncle who was a spy and I've always been fascinated by that world, so I thought there might be a little fun to be had. We were never allowed to mention the fact that he was a spy, he was just officially in the Navy, but we all knew."
This film was released in the same year alongside the 007 film Spectre (2015) and Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation (2015), all three of which are spy features that began in the 1960s.
Guy Ritchie's first screenwriting credit since RocknRolla (2008).
Kuryakin wears a bow tie in one scene and Solo says he looks bad with it. David McCallum, who played Kuryakin in The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (1964) and plays Ducky on NCIS (2003), wears bow ties (and looks good in them).
Hugh Grant shot his scenes over three weeks.
Opting to retain the initial source property's Cold War context, with all its cultural and political touchstones, director Guy Ritchie said: "It's a tip of the hat to the series. We wanted to capture the essence and uniqueness of that time while making it immediately accessible to today's audiences, and as original, attractive and fresh as possible." The resulting tenor "is both period and contemporary, which feels like a very natural process to me."
It's hard to know what irritates Russian Illya Kuryakin (Armie Hammer) most about the new American colleague, Napoleon Solo (Henry Cavill), whom he calls "The Cowboy", and what he perceives as the American's cavalier attitude, his accidental credentials or his sense of entitlement. "But there is definitely friction," Hammer confirmed. "At the same time, as much as Illya looks at him as an amateur who doesn't know what he's doing, this Solo guy just broke into a secure facility with what looks like a paper clip, so that's pretty impressive...".
The production used real equipment salvaged from 1963 on some of the sets. This specific set was used during two days of production but was an important sequence in the film. The specific scene wasn't revealed.
Typifying the young British fan of the time, Hugh Grant, who stars as the enigmatic Waverly, confesses, "I had a 'Man from U.N.C.L.E.' model car. I believe you pressed the top off and it shot guns out of the sides. I might still have it."
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"One of the things Guy wanted to do was land a truck on top of a boat, and play the comedic beats of the truck sinking the boat with Solo sitting in the cab," said special effects supervisor Dominic Tuohy. This was part of a larger scene in which the two agents have to evade a boat-load of assassins following a night-time prowl in the Vinciguerra factory. Stunt coordinator Paul Jennings said: "In the harbor chase, Armie had to do a lot of piloting. We took him out in the boat for a test and he was a natural, which gave us the freedom to film him steering the boat. It's great when you can slot an actor into a situation like that and know they can deal with it." For Tuohy's team, the logistics proved more complex. "When you drive something off a height to land on a boat, it wants to push the boat away," he explained. So, a lightweight truck was designed to engage with a rig that would land it on the exact spot. The next problem was that the boat, large and made of fiberglass, required a displacement of about thirty tons to sink it, which they didn't have. They also didn't have the time to wait for it to sink. Instead, they used pyrotechnic charges to break the seals holding the boat together, allowing water to rush in. Meanwhile a hydraulic ram beneath it pulled the whole thing under in about ten seconds, allowing Cavill to land both the heroics and the humor of the scene in one take. The production notes for the film described this overall sequence as "The Harbor Cruise".
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Henry Cavill and Armie Hammer have both had Jesse Eisenberg as a nemesis in a motion picture; Hammer played both Winklevoss twins opposite Eisenberg's portrayal of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg in The Social Network (2010) and Cavill plays Superman opposite Eisenberg's portrayal of supervillain Lex Luthor in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016).
When the large group of agents gets up and leaves the Cafe Gustav, a Berliner jelly doughnut is left on one of the tables. This might be a reference to the "Ich bin ein Berliner" speech given by JFK in Berlin on June 26, 1963. It's been argued that an alternative translation of what Kennedy said is "I am a jelly doughnut."
The Rome locations included the famed Spanish Steps, Teatro Marcello, Piazza Venezia and the Grand Plaza Hotel, where Solo, Kuryakin and Gaby stay while cozying up to the Vinciguerras. In Naples, the team used the underground tunnels at the Fonderia Iron Works for the dungeons of the Vinciguerra island compound, which could be the ideal spot to hide a nuclear physicist with his own underground lab, while the Castle Baja in the Bay of Naples, believed to have been built for the Emperor Nero, provided its impressive exteriors.
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The classic motorcycle ridden by Armie Hammer, heavy and cumbersome, bore the weight of Hollywood history. The motor-bike was a limited edition Metisse Desert Racer, built by the renowned Metisse workshop in Oxfordshire in England, an exact replica of the Mark III model designed by Bud Ekins and actor Steve McQueen in the 1960s.
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The speech JFK is seen on TV giving is probably his speech at American University's Spring Commencement, delivered on June 10, 1963 (it contains the phrase, "Our commitment to defend Western Europe and West Berlin for example, stands undiminished...").
Napoleon Solo, played by Henry Cavill (Superman in Man of Steel (2013)), was originally played by Robert Vaughn (the villain Ross Webster in Superman III (1983).
Starring as Illya Kuryakin, Armie Hammer offers the volatile but more conventional Russian's point of view. Hammer said: "Kuryakin is the ultimate soldier, always in line and giving his best. Then he's thrust into a position that he hates and there's nothing he can do about it. This guy he's working with, this Napoleon Solo, he's so unorthodox. He doesn't follow the rules. He doesn't even seem to know there are rules."
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As Henry Cavill understands the quintessentially smooth Napoleon Solo. He said: "He's not career CIA; in fact, he's kind of anti-establishment. He acquired his skill set dealing art and antiques on the black market after sneaking his way into post-war European high society, and was so good that no one could catch him for years. It's something he took a great deal of pride in. But eventually he was given up by a jealous girlfriend, and the CIA, seeing the value of a man like him, offered an ultimatum: go to jail or work for us. So he ended up becoming an agent, very successfully but somewhat reluctantly. It's better than being in jail and he can still wear natty suits."
Is based on the show of the same name, which ran for five years (1964-1968).
Of Alicia Vikander, "we were fans of Alicia's from A Royal Affair [A Royal Affair (2012)]," said producer Lionel Wigram, "and of course she's gone on to so many other successes since then. "We wanted a European actress for the role, someone who could play German and had that fantastic mixture of youth and naïveté with real intelligence and strength." Making the transition from unpretentious garage mechanic to couture-draped arm candy isn't easy for the straight-talking, down-to-earth young woman. "But if it will keep her this side of the Berlin Wall for the rest of her life, Gaby is game for just about anything," Vikander. "I loved the fact that they made her a cool, tomboyish girl with a lot of character," she continued. "Gaby was brought up in a man's world and so she's quite feisty and she knows how to stand her ground. If anything, she has a tough time relaxing and pretending she wants to be just a pretty housewife, and I think it's partly her desire to assert her independence that causes sparks to fly between her and Illya." Gaby creates sparks between Illya Kuryakin and Napoleon Solo, too, but only insofar as it gives them more to clash over, starting with a comical scene in which they try to one-up each other with their designer savvy while helping Gaby select her mod wardrobe...perhaps causing her to wonder if navigating Armageddon might be the easiest part of this mission.
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For his part, Napoleon Solo (Henry Cavill) finds the Russian Illya Kuryakin (Armie Hammer) unrefined and unpredictable, "but in some ways they're two sides of the same coin," Cavill observed. "The differences in their personalities and methods are vast, but they're on the same spectrum. And even though they're in this because Solo and Kuryakin have no choice, they are always mindful that they have a mission and there are lives at stake, not to mention the destruction of the world, so they have to try to make their skills work together. It could end up that the team is greater than the sum of its parts."
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In both this movie and Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (2011), Jared Harris' character signals for everyone to leave a café so a private conversation can be had. Both movies were directed by Guy Ritchie.
Henry Cavill is the second actor to be cast in a lead role by Guy Ritchie immediately following a breakout role in a Zack Snyder film (Man of Steel (2013)). The first actor was Gerard Butler, who starred in Snyder's film 300 (2006) and later Ritchies's film RocknRolla (2008)
The film's Berlin sets exude a cool, stark palette overall, in comparison to the more lush, bright and sensuous colors and textures of the film's Italian locales.
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In some ways, the 1960s depicted in The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (1964) are a rare and enticing moment in time that only really existed on screen. Director Guy Ritchie said: "What I remember most about the series was its tone. And when the opportunity arose for me to make the movie, that's what inspired me. The idea of 'The Man from U.N.C.L.E.' just rang a bell for me. I had an intuitive response to it." Producer Lionel Wigram said: "For us, the '60s were the coolest decade and 'The Man from U.N.C.L.E.' was a part of that," Wigram continues. "We were always keen on doing a spy story. We loved the early Bond movies, which really made an imprint on our young minds, and then the Italian and French films of the time, like L'Avventura (1960) and La Dolce Vita (1960), that had a particular flavor we found so stylish and interesting. Whether it's the clothes, the cars, the movies, or the design, the '60s really marked the beginning of the modern age."
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The production employed practical effects as much as possible. Special Effects Supervisor Dominic Tuohy offered one example: "The stunt driving positions we built onto the vehicles were framed out, as they would have done pre-CG, so the camera captures what the audience will see in frame, rather than filming the whole rig and having CG paint it out later." At the same time, visual effects, supervised by Richard Bain, proved invaluable in other applications, such as helping transform the streets of the Greenwich Royal Naval Academy and the Chatham Docks, where the chase was filmed, into East Berlin. "Greenwich is one of our most valued archives, and to stage a chase there is special onto itself," Tuohy added. "Its streets are unique and irreplaceable and that created a challenge in protecting that environment. Where you see sections of pavement, it's not real. We put down areas of flooring so that, if we drove over it, it wouldn't damage what was underneath."
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"The score was a very important, fundamental part of the film," said director Guy Ritchie. "I think sometimes, in certain scenes, the music should lead the charge and the action is subservient to that. We worked for the first time with a talented young composer, Daniel Pemberton, and I'm quite happy with the way it turned out."
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In one scene Ilya Kuryakin wears the same outfit (turtleneck, jacket, shades) as Erik Lensherr (Michael Fassbender) does in X: First Class (2011). Fassbender was considered for the role of Solo.
The character of Waverly displays the most unassuming attitude and introduces himself with a handshake and a single name, despite the fact that he turns out to be a significant power broker, the breadth of which isn't fully realized until much later. Hugh Grant said of his Waverly character: "I imagine he's a rather smooth but probably quite scary top British spy," the actor speculated. "Like a lot of them, he likely comes from a naval background. I believe he's done his share of fighting and quite enjoyed it, but now he's a man in very nice suits outsmarting the people behind the Iron Curtain and perhaps outsmarting the American CIA as well, because there was always that rivalry, and there's a touch of that, too, in the film."
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The action sequences in this movie required the collaboration of stunt coordinator Paul Jennings and special effects supervisor Dominic Tuohy, following director Guy Ritchie's brief to bring something new to the screen. "We also wanted to make the action scenes reveal more about the characters," said Jennings, who was in charge of training the cast for an onslaught of fist fights, gun battles, motorcycle chases, car chases and explosions, among a long list of stunts. Jennings continued: "Guy likes visceral filmmaking. He thinks outside the box and gives you the freedom to do the same. You have to be daring and go with your gut on a Guy Ritchie film. Even if things don't quite work the first time, he doesn't mind; he's pleased you gave it a go." In this case, both Henry Cavill and Armie Hammer were more than willing to give it a go, plunging in with total commitment and eager to do as many of their own stunts as possible. "Not to take anything away from our excellent stunt crew, who took some nasty tumbles and accomplished some incredible things," Cavill was quick to add, continuing: "But Armie and I are both very physical actors and love to get involved. There are some major action sequences that, when I first heard about them, I assumed would be CG, which we ended up doing largely in camera."
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Armie Hammer credited his wardrobe for helping him establish his character Ilya Kuryakin's persona. "It didn't feel like costuming," he affirmed. "It felt just like clothes because it was never over the top." Indeed, Kuryakin was the more understated of the two agents, partly, Hammer joked, because, "he was on a Soviet budget." Costume Designer Joanna Johnston kept the Russian agent's wardrobe low-key and casual-sexy overall, saying: "His look was comprised of separates, suede and corduroy jackets, slacks and, of course, the turtleneck sweaters, which was the only element I had to keep from the TV show [The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (1964)] because it's the first thing everyone I talked to mentioned."
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Kuryakin (Armie Hammer) gives Solo (Henry Cavill) the nickname of Cowboy; Hammer had previously starred as the cowboy hero The Lone Ranger (2013). In similar irony, Solo gives Kuryakin the nickname of Red Peril (or Peril for short); Cavill had previously starred as the all-American hero Superman in Man of Steel (2013).
Locations play a significant role in the picture helping set the tone and authenticity. "We were pleased on 'Sherlock Holmes' that our recreation of 19th Century London transported audiences, and we've tried to do the same here with our depictions of Berlin and Rome, which were inspired by so many films of the time," producer Lionel Wigram explained. "Rome typifies the style of the '60s and Berlin is, of course, the focal point of all those Cold War movies."
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Supervising location manager Sue Quinn scoured the length and breadth of Europe for sites that met director Guy Ritchie's vision of "a glamorous look and a '60s feel but with an edge," she relates. "We started in Rome, with all its fantastic 1930s architecture from the Mussolini era, which looks so great on film. But Rome is bursting with tourists and a logistical challenge, so we went to Naples and the surrounding area to expand our palette."
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Studios Leavesden studio sound-stages housed a range of sets, including the interiors of the Rome hotel, Victoria's sleek, angular, Italian neo-fascist-styled company headquarters, and the underground laboratory where a captive Udo Teller is pressed into service.
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Actor Sylvester Groth plays Rudi, an inveterate Nazi, as devoted to his cause as he is to his twisted hobbies. In an interesting link to the film, Groth was actually born in East Germany, and ultimately defected to the West.
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"Architecture is not as fast to react to trends as are clothes or products, so the architectural spectrum of our sets is much bigger," said production designer Oliver Scholl, who used a range of structures that would have existed at the time. "The period is invoked in such myriad details as storefronts, graphics, awnings, posters, window displays, doors, furnishings and hardware."
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The UK stood in for East Germany, offering both practical locations and sets built at Warner Bros. Studios Leavesden, including the infamous Checkpoint Charlie, recreated on the studio back lot. Portions of Greenwich Naval College in Southeast London and the Chatham Docks in Kent, heavily augmented with CG, figured in the opening chase alongside the Berlin Wall, allowing the design team to secure the look they were seeking along with the flexibility and convenience of shooting in a controlled environment. The historic Goodwood Circuit racetrack in West Sussex was also re-purposed into an Italian venue where Alexander Vinciguerra can show off his fleet.
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The single most complex setting from a design standpoint, as well as stunts and effects, was the climactic chase off Vinciguerra Island, which was collaged from several individual locations: Hankley Common, a rural area in Surrey; the Miseno tunnels and Baia Castle in Naples; roads outside of Rome; and Aberystwyth, on the west coast of Wales.
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The film's director Guy Ritchie said of the film's two lead central characters of Napoleon Solo (Henry Cavill) and Kuryakin (Armie Hammer): "What we found so irresistible was taking these polar-opposite agents and forcing them together so that they start out trying to annihilate each other and end up cooperating, but maybe still not entirely trusting each other. The story is largely the evolution of their collaboration. The fact that one represents capitalist America and the other represents communist Russia, and these two super powers have to team up to neutralize a threat with global stakes, is a great premise that you can have a lot of fun with, and that's really the spine of the story."
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Director Guy Ritchie said of this movie: "It's a zone I find fascinating, the way men interact with each other. Even going back to Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998), I'm drawn to that male-to-male dynamic as kind of a genre unto itself."
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Australian actress Elizabeth Debicki plays Victoria, an ambitious, stunning, ice blonde from hardscrabble beginnings who married a wealthy Italian playboy long on looks but little else. "He isn't exactly the brains of the operation," Debicki admitted. "He likes fast cars and women, and that's fine with Victoria because she can sit behind the desk and run the show, which is what she's always wanted. She's a self-created, enterprising woman and quite a social climber."
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Technically, the Abbey Road facility proved a treasure trove of the kinds of period equipment needed to achieve the specific sound the production was after. "We used every single bit of kit that has been kicking around there since the '60s that we could get our hands on," composer Daniel Pemberton said with all the enthusiasm of an archaeologist on a successful dig. "We used tape machines, old desks, even the building's echo chamber, which is how they created echoes before digital or even analog equipment. You'd send a microphone into a tiled room and there'd be a loudspeaker in there, and you would play the sound and record the echo in the room. We sourced some great period instruments, from vintage harpsichords to old basses and guitars, and worked with Sam Okell, their in-house 1960s genius who knows every bit of that gear from years of mixing and engineering Beatles re-masters. "It was all part of the process of creating a distinctive sound," he concluded. "Maybe the best way of describing it is, to sound new, we had to travel through time."
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The character of Napoleon Solo's CIA boss Adrian Sanders (Jared Harris) is named after classic star George Sanders, who portrayed "The Saint", and played a spy in many other movies.
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Co-star Armie Hammer, who had never seen the television show The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (1964), delved into some of the classic episodes for a point of reference, while co-star Henry Cavill, who was equally unfamiliar with it, took the opposite approach. But each sought to make these characters entirely their own.
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One reason that tales of espionage and secret agendas continue to thrill and entertain, generation upon generation, might be the cyclic nature of history and politics. Producer Steve Clark-Hall suggested: Without getting too deep, with the Snowden [Edward Snowden] case and the massive amount of recent revelations about the sort of spying that still goes on, I think it's something that people are intrinsically fascinated by - the nature of relationships and the opportunity for betrayal, the complex alliances nations find themselves in, and not being sure who to trust. In some ways today's world is reflective of the tensions of the '60s that the movie plays on."
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An Italian actor was cast as Victoria (Elizabeth Debicki)'s husband, Alexander. Making his starring English-language feature debut as the handsome race car driver is Italian Luca Calvani. Calling him a new discovery for worldwide audiences, producer Lionel Wigram commented: "Luca is the epitome of what we had in mind. He gives Alexander just the right air of sinister glamour that makes him credible and, at the same time, so much fun."
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Of his character Alexander, Italian actor Luca Calvani said: "Alexander believes he's found the perfect trophy wife, which is funny because he ends up being the trophy husband in a way, as the financier of Victoria's evil schemes. But his ego is such that he thinks he is somewhat still in charge."
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The work of costume designer Joanna Johnston harmonized with the sets and tones selected by production designer Oliver Scholl. "In Berlin, the overriding visual was concrete. Everything was cold, hard, and quite dismal," she said. "We have a bit of freshness coming through with the introduction of prints and patterns when the story crosses over to West Berlin but the palette is still cold. Then, in Italy, the colors are warm and it's all very sophisticated." How the Cold War era broke culturally from the immediate post-Second World War drabness of the 1950s was what inspired Johnston, who researched the period via fashion magazines of the time. "It was all about color," she expanded. "It was a very radical and adventurous time across all disciplines, from art to fashion and music. What really struck me was the freedom of design of the time; it shines through the photography, the models, the styling, everything." In sync with director Guy Ritchie, Johnston strove to avoid the kind of cliché extremes that can mar a period piece, opting for something "more subtle and original, but still glossy and slick, like those films you remember where everyone looked good no matter what they were doing."
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"As a director, you face a number of creative considerations when you approach a project," said director Guy Ritchie, harking back to the moment when the ideas for a big-scale "U.N.C.L.E" feature first came together for him. "The relationships, the dynamic, the narrative, they're all exciting questions. With this, there was the added challenge of bringing a classic concept and period to life in a contemporary and entertaining way, and we all had a lot of fun seeing what we could do with it."
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Producer Lionel Wigram said of actress Elizabeth Debicki" "Elizabeth was phenomenal in The Great Gatsby (2013); she really stood out in a fantastic cast and so when her name came up, [director] Guy [Ritchie] and I felt it was an inspired and obvious choice. She did a reading that was sensational, plus, her look reminded us of a young Catherine Deneuve, which was perfect for that period."
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Elizabeth Debicki, an Australian actress portraying a woman from Liverpool in England but with a deliberate clipped RP [Standard English] accent, noted: "So few of us are playing our nationalities." Indeed, Henry Cavill, a Brit, plays American; Hammer, an American, plays Russian; and Vikander, a Swede, plays German, all of which just added to the international air of the production, in concert with the various locations in England and Italy where the production filmed.
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In keeping with the film's tonal integrity, score composer Daniel Pemberton sought to capture a sound that combined the crispness and sophistication of today with a distinctly '60s flavor. The first step was the venue: "The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (2015) score was recorded in Studio 2 at Abbey Road, where even the most casual music fan likely knows, The Beatles recorded their albums." Thematically, he said, "we went for a different, minimal approach that meant musically using less but writing and producing in a way that still has the impact of a big orchestral score."
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Variety reported that Emily Blunt was considered for the role of Gaby Teller when Steven Soderbergh was set to direct.
It's their shared influences, combined with a passion for cinema and a simpatico sense of humor, that make Guy Ritchie and Lionel Wigram such a tight screen-writing team. "It's great having a producing partner who can write, because writing is fundamental to filmmaking and the story is an organic, living, ongoing process," Ritchie acknowledged. "We both love the idea of taking a classic genre and putting a twist on it," Wigram added. "And Guy is constantly trying to do something new with the action, to give audiences something they haven't quite seen before."
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The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (2015) stands entirely by itself. But for those familiar with its genetic line, including Guy Ritchie, Lionel Wigram, and fellow producers John Davis and Steve Clark-Hall, there is a bonus in sharing their affection for an archetype that enthralled mid-1960s television viewers and spy-game aficionados on both sides of the Atlantic. "When I was growing up, they were the coolest guys with the coolest gadgets and weapons," recalled Davis, who was raised in the USA. "It was a secret international force working behind the scenes to keep the planet safe, like the United Nations of the spy world, and I loved it."
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Jeff Kleeman and David C. Wilson, who share story credit with co-screenwriters Guy Ritchie and Lionel Wigram, cite the enduring allure of "daring lone agents who take on powerful forces and display grace under pressure. What really sets spy films apart are their heroes, who time and again are forced to rely upon their true secret weapons: ingenuity, resourcefulness and wit."
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Illya Kuryakin's rise at the KGB was the result of years of dedication, training and single-minded effort. Armie Hammer said of this, his character, the youngest agent in the organization to have attained such elite status: "He's a classic spy. He grew up in the system and rose through the ranks and he's very by-the-book. His lifelong goal was to be a KGB operative and that's the most important thing to him."
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Fresh off four television seasons of the AMC period drama, Mad Men (2007), actor Jared Harris was already steeped in all things 1960s. Welcoming the chance to revisit another facet of the era, Harris said: "It was a good script, tight, and with a sense of humor."
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The climactic pursuit takes place on the Vinciguerras' island, where everything that matters is suddenly and dynamically in play, where people seize whatever method of transport is handy, and where every fresh twist alters the balance of power. The hero vehicles include a 1960s motorcycle, a modified Land Rover that takes a swim, and a growling, custom-built four-wheel drive ATV that director Guy Ritchie aptly called "a beast." "Of course a Rock Crawler wasn't quite period correct, but I wasn't going to let that stand in the way, so we built our own," he said. The vehicle does precisely what its name suggests, powering up nearly 90-degree hills before aquaplaning more than 300 feet across a lake. "I'm not quite sure what to do with it now. It's seven feet wide." Director Ritchie was looking for unique and punishing terrain, which resulted in a sequence seamlessly fused from multiple locations. Jennings recounted: "We start in Italy, go through a tunnel and up a mountainside, still in Italy, and then cut to a shot in Wales, then to Hankley Commons, and mix in some of Northshire. We were all over the place, but, in the end, I think we achieved something really different." At the controls of the Rock Crawler, Solo displays his quick thinking as the action unfolds. Knowing Alexander Vinciguerra's Land Rover can easily outpace him on the road, he forges his own path through scrub, hills, forest, mud and grit to cut him off. Kuryakin, meanwhile, takes a different road in the concurrently running action sequences, astride a 1960s motorcycle that he rides until it becomes un-rideable. That's when the resourceful agent has to find another use for it.
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Preparing for the sequence that the production notes for the film describes as "Off-Roading at the Vinciguerra Estate", star Armie Hammer was not overly concerned. An avid rider since getting his first dirt bike as a child, he considered himself competent enough. But assistant stunt coordinator Lee Morrison didn't initially see it the same way. Hammer recalled: "We showed up at a big grass field and Lee said, 'Okay, I'm going to do a little assessment to see how you ride. Go up there, do a turn, come back, do a figure-eight and then go through those cones and stop.' I figured, 'No problem, this is going to be easy.' So I ran through it all and came back, and he said, 'What the hell was that? Is that how you sit? Is that how you hold your elbows?' So he taught me the proper form and honestly elevated my motorcycle riding, which was great for me - especially on that vintage bike, that didn't have fifty years of advancements so it was heavy and cumbersome."
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The wardrobe of Napoleon Solo (Henry Cavill) was another matter entirely compared to that for Ilya Kuryakin (Armie Hammer). Costume Designer Joanna Johnston said: "Solo has reinvented himself, in a way, so I thought a more considered approach would be appropriate," she says. "He has fine tailoring from Saville Row and handmade shoes, and looks like the proper gentleman. I used Timothy Everest, a well known British tailor, to make all of Henry's suits. He's all about the vanity and projection of his appearance, so expensive, good-looking, and chic." Cavill couldn't agree more: "They were made of the most wonderful fabric and as soon as I put them on, I felt like Napoleon Solo," he said.
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Costume designing for the lead actresses added yet another dimension to the palette. Alicia Vikander's character, Gaby, though introduced as a tomboy in functional overalls, quickly shifts into couture with ease. Her breezy style costume designer Joanna Johnston described as "fresh, young, simple and clean, but with the feeling that she could do anything at any time." Vikander recalled: "I came in for a few fittings, which is a great way to get into character, and Joanna let me be a part of the process. She brought in mood boards with pictures and ideas, and it's easy to let your imagination and fantasies take over. I saw one amazing dress with an open back that I liked and, the next time I came in, there it was."
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In Elizabeth Debicki's chilling character of Victoria, costume designer Joanna Johnston saw a trace of Napoleon Solo. "In her individual way, Victoria is sort of a match for him with the consideration and application, her projection of image. She likes a lot of drama in her look. She's a snake, and she wants to snare people into her lair." Debicki happily collaborated with Johnston on Victoria's striking black-and-white signature look, highly polished and graphic. "Victoria's clothes represent the best of '60s fashion. She's quite a fan of bling and belts and, because she's so wealthy, we felt there needn't be any limit. Plus, being the villain means you can do whatever you please," she said.
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When Steven Soderbergh was attached to direct, Channing Tatum was considered for the role of Napoleon Solo.
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The weapon Ilya uses in the commando assault was not the iconic Walther P-38-based UNCLE Special; but, was a Walther GSP target pistol. It can also be seen in the end credits dossier. The shoulder stock is also different, as it is curved, whereas the original was a straight tubular design. The chief difference is that the Walther GSP has a magazine forward of the trigger assembly, whereas the P-38 had the magazine housed in the pistol grip. It is also a .22LR, vs the P-38's 9mm parabellum cartridge.
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This movie was first released in the same 2015 year as a number of other spy, espionage, intelligence, and secret agent movies, with a couple of them also comedies. The movies include Spy (2015) [a Bond spoof]; Spectre (2015); Sicario (2015) [FBI; which has a title which is almost an anagram of Ian Fleming's "Risico" (1960) James Bond short-story bar the letter 'A']; Survivor (2015) starring Pierce Brosnan; Black Mass (2015) [FBI]; Mortdecai (2015) [has an MI5 agent lead character]; Queen of the Desert (2015) [central character was a WWI attaché to the British Secret Service]; the Bondian Furious 7 (2015); Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation (2015) [which shot in three of the same countries as Spectre (2015): Austria, England, & Morocco]; Steven Spielberg's Bridge of Spies (2015) [a cold war espionage thriller]; The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (2015) [Ian Fleming was an original co-creator], MI-5 (2015) aka "MI-5"; and even Kingsman: The Secret Service (2014) [a Bondesque homage], a 2014 film but which was mostly widely theatrically released in 2015. Also in theaters in 2015 from 2014, was Pierce Brosnan and Quantum of Solace (2008)'s Olga Kurylenko in The November Man (2014); and the heavily Oscar nominated World War II espionage film, The Imitation Game (2014). First released in 2014 were 3 Days to Kill (2014) and Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (2014).
Director Guy Ritchie said of the movie's locations: "Certain iconic images like the Berlin Wall and Checkpoint Charlie are essential components for a story like this to be true to its genre and its time."
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Production Designer Oliver Scholl said that overall, director "Guy [Guy Ritchie] wanted the look and feel of the '60s to be present, but not obvious or clichéd, with hints of the Cold War. Getting that balance was key. That sense guided not only his choices but those of the entire creative team."
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Renowned cinematographer John Mathieson worked closely with director Guy Ritchie throughout, creating a lighting scheme producer Lionel Wigram said was "both reminiscent of the time and having a modern energy. The way he lined up his shots, the atmosphere he created . . . he's done an absolutely brilliant job."
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For the film's music score composer, Daniel Pemberton, it was an experience unlike any other. Pemberton said: "Guy [director Guy Ritchie]'s main thing was that he wanted everything to be simple and memorable," he related. "He wanted every single piece of music to be unique and feel like a strong stand-alone track, while still accomplishing the things a movie score needs to do in terms of highlighting and enhancing the action. So it was incredibly challenging, but also fantastic and very exciting for me because I got to really, really push it and be incredibly bold in a way that, as a composer, you don't normally have the opportunity to do."
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Henry Cavill and Elizabeth Debicki both play comic book characters, Henry plays Clark Kent/Superman in the DC Extended Universe while Elizabeth plays Ayesha in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
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Kuryakin never once calls Napoleon Solo by his real name. He always refers to him as "Cowboy".
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Action is an integral part of the "U.N.C.L.E." story-line and it's something on which director Guy Ritchie does not compromise. "The actors have worked exceptionally hard," he stated. "They've all been very involved, physically. It's often a volatile arena: you're shooting guns, you're flying all around the place. You have to be an athlete because, on a tough day, you are cracking on for eight hours."
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This picture also counts among its vintage vehicles a 1960 Hiller UH12E4 helicopter that previously had a starring role in another earlier spy movie, Goldfinger (1964), a fact that can momentarily revert even veteran filmmakers into James Bond fanboys, as producer and co-screenwriter Lionel Wigram delightedly proclaimed: "We have Pussy Galore's helicopter from Goldfinger (1964) in our film. I can't tell you how exciting that is!". It also harks back to the film series in that James Bond creator Ian Fleming is known to have contributed some thoughts to the precursor television project of The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (1964) in its early conceptual stages.
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Guy Ritchie and Jared Harris previously worked together on Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (2011).
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Debut English-language theatrical feature film of Italian actor Luca Calvani.
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The climactic raid on the Vinciguerra compound, an extended action-fueled sequence, where so much is happening simultaneously that director Guy Ritchie offers some of it in a kaleidoscopic split-screen, was propelled throughout by the movie's music score. Composer Daniel Pemberton said: "There is often no dialogue, or very minimal dialogue. I remember, at the time, it was me, Guy and his editor, James Herbert, trying to work out how to make it different from what audiences will have heard before, and we got the idea of trying this anarchic, almost poly-rhythmic percussion piece that echoes the intensity of the attack. It descends into chaos, out of control, but somehow pulls itself together, rising and falling with the action. It's one of the passages I'm most proud of."
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Echoing the composer Daniel Pemberton's sentiments, producer and co-screenwriter Lionel Wigram said: "It's nice to be able to recreate that time using today's technology, the best of both worlds, essentially. Guy [director Guy Ritchie] and I love period movies because we feel it allows us to create an experience where you can have a heightened sensibility and still suspend the audiences' disbelief. You can go a bit larger than life because there's always a sense of reality attached."
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When they are getting Gaby clothes before heading to Rome, Ilya and Napoleon argue over matching clothes. When Ilya believes his point has been proven, he tells Napoleon "Get back on your horse, cowboy." Armie Hammer, who portrays Ilya, previously played The Lone Ranger in Disney's 2013 adaptation.
Actress Alicia Vikander would go on to co-star in Jason Bourne (2016) with Matt Damon whilst actress Elizabeth Debicki would go on to co-star in the BBC espionage television series The Night Manager (2016) which is based on John le Carré's novel of the same name.
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The key, for director Guy Ritchie, in bringing a lot of energy together, apart from the barbed banter and unshakable cool of his charismatic leads, is what he calls "the balance of real danger, drama and action with a lightness of touch. It's the juxtaposition of different moods that I find most creative and stimulating," he said, noting that he makes the kinds of movies that would attract him as a viewer and a vital ingredient of that is the kind of humor that tends to percolate to the surface almost effortlessly. "Not that it should all be funny. I'm looking for the whole gamut of emotions. We start off writing more serious scenes, but what often happens on the day of filming is that the scenes start not taking themselves quite so seriously and the humor invariably finds its way in. "We had a great cast all around, led by Henry [Cavill] and Armie [Hammer], and Alicia [Vikander] as Gaby," he continued. "The guys have brilliant chemistry and Alicia is truly something special. And they really had to work for it. It wasn't a soft job, not mentally or physically. Filming is collaboration and I want actors to own what they say. Granted, a director has the advantage of seeing the bigger picture and the actors have to trust that, but I'm always interested in the best idea in the room. As long as it doesn't hold us back, and it seldom does, I'm up for everyone being creative."
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Though committed to the premise and the politically charged setting of the series, director Guy Ritchie used that merely as a jumping off point when it came to developing the Napoleon Solo and Illya Kuryakin characters and their potential back-stories for the big screen, from the broad strokes to the intimate details, in a way that was previously unexplored. Since the series picked up at an unspecified mid-point in the partnership, the filmmakers and the actors had the freedom to imagine the process by which these two disparate personalities reached their personal détente.
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This film is based on a popular TV series from the 1960s. Previously, Henry Cavill played Superman, while Arnie Hammer played the Lone Ranger. Both of these characters were featured in popular TV series from the 1950s.
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In much the same way the director Guy Ritchie's "Sherlock Holmes" films took audiences into Victorian London without losing the edge that made them so sharp and current [See Sherlock Holmes (2009) and Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (2011)], The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (2015), also directed by Ritchie, distills everything that made the 1960s cool - from its art, fashion and music, to its attitudes and perspectives - into a spot-on but understated vibe that is both retro and undeniably 21st century.
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The movie's closing credits state that the picture was: "Filmed at Warner Bros. Studios [in] Leavesden, England" and "On location in Aldershot, Chatham & Greenwich, [in] England [and] Rome, Naples, [in] Italy".
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The alternate mode of the Decepticon leader Megatron in the animated TV series The Transformers (1984) was based on a modified Walther P38 with scope and extensions similar to the gun used in the TV series The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (1964) and to what Illya Kuryakin (Armie Hammer) briefly uses in this film.
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On this film, producer and co-screenwriter Lionel Wigram was reunited with director, producer and co-screenwriter Guy Ritchie, following their successful partnership on the equally genre-blurring "Sherlock Holmes" films [See Sherlock Holmes (2009) and Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (2011)].
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Jared Harris said of Adrian Sanders, his CIA boss character in the film: "Sanders is having a bit of a hard time with this independent, somewhat insolent agent who is also, of course, tremendously talented. Perhaps consequently, he's sort of bad-tempered and grumpy. He lives in a gray world but deals in absolutes and he sees things in terms of 'It's the United States, first and foremost'."
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In much the same way the director Guy Ritchie's "Sherlock Holmes" films took audiences into Victorian London without losing the edge that made them so sharp and current [See Sherlock Holmes (2009) and Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (2011)], The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (2015), also directed by Ritchie, distills everything that made the 1960s cool - from its art, fashion and music, to its attitudes and perspectives - into a spot-on but understated vibe that is both retro and undeniably 21st century. "That's the Guy Ritchie magic," producer Lionel Wigram remarked. "He strikes a certain note which, somehow, makes everything feel 'of today.'"
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The film opens in 1963. The U.S. and the Soviet Union are locked in a tense, high-stakes game of chicken over nuclear arms supremacy, and the wartime research of former Nazi scientists is still at a premium on the not-so-open market. A twelve feet concrete wall divides post-World War II Berlin and it's here, in its long shadows, that Solo and Kuryakin first size each other up in a breakneck, winner-take-all street chase.
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Henry Cavill, stars as Napoleon Solo, the suave and often self-serving American. When Solo meets Illya Kuryakin (Armie Hammer) for the first time, Cavill said, "they kick the living daylights out of each other as soon as they meet."
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Whilst Henry Cavill is the current Superman in Man of Steel (2013) and Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016), co star Armie Hammer almost played another iconic DC hero; he was cast as Batman in the cancelled Justice League Immortal.
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The nick-name of Gabriella Teller ( Alicia Vikander) was "Gaby".
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

One of the young men that Illya Kuryakin beats up in the Italian rest room is Count Lippi. Even though the last letter in his name is changed from being Count Lippe, it seems as if this is a definite nod to the Count Lippe from Thunderball (1965). Moreover, in this film's remake, Never Say Never Again (1983), there is also a Lippe character.
The ship the missile is hidden on is called the Diadema. This is a type of sea urchin. Also, it is the Greek word for a ribbon worn around the head and, most importantly, a queen's crown.
The story starts off with a bang, accompanied by breaking glass and burning rubber, as the newly acquainted Gabriella Teller (Alicia Vikander) and Napoleon Solo (Henry Cavill), in a vintage Wartburg sedan, try to elude Ilya Kuryakin (Armie Hammer)'s Trabant through the dark streets of East Berlin to meet Solo's contact on the other side. The production notes for the film described this sequence as a "Shootout in Berlin". "Guy envisioned it as a ballet," said special effects supervisor Dominic Tuohy. "We modified both vehicles for a blind driver, meaning the Wartburg had a driving position mounted on the roof and the Trabant had one low down in front, which enabled stunt drivers to maneuver them at full speed with the actors inside, keeping them fully involved. And we had a tracking vehicle traveling with them. "We wanted to keep the two cars close while making tight turns around corners," he continued, "so we adapted one of them to be extremely light and made a rig that attached them to each other. Then, in a green screen environment, we built a hydraulic turntable so we could put the two cars together and move them backwards and forwards, as if they were gaining on one another, and also let them move independently or rotate them on a 360-degree spin."
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The outdoor scene where Gabby confesses is filmed at the same location as A Midsummer Night's Dream (1999)

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