Rock musician Lou Reed interviews his cousin on the eve of her 100th birthday.

Director:

Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Shirley Novick ...
Herself
...
Himself
Edit

Storyline

Rock musician Lou Reed interviews his cousin on the eve of her 100th birthday.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary | Short

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

20 April 2010 (Switzerland)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Great Memories
13 November 2013 | by (São Paulo, Brazil) – See all my reviews

Not only the man was one of the greatest rock n'roll artists of all time, a voice of a generation and inspiration for many groups and artists to come, but the great Lou Reed even had time to direct one film, short in time but larger in content and importance. Here he interviews his cousin on the eve of her 100th birthday, a lady that goes by the name of Shirley Novick and she has plenty of life stories to share, much to Reed's amazement. Her story could give a great movie: born in Poland, she witnessed and survived through World War I; then fled to live alone in Canada (her parents stayed in Europe during World War II but sent her to Canada while her sisters were sent to Israel); from there she illegally immigrated to the U.S. to work on a textile factory in which she stayed for more than 40 years, engaging in union struggles for better work conditions. And she even was part of the Civil Rights March on Washington in 1963.

It's a small yet important historical register of a great person who went through many things, lived long enough to share in completely lucidity and vivacity her stories of struggle and survival, someone who lived plenty. And I'm glad Lou made such a nice picture. Don't be surprised, he's a good director and a patient interviewer. Doesn't stay focused just on the talking head documentary style, he also focus on Shirley's objects and old pictures showing what's left of her trajectory, such as a cushion she knitted herself, one of her few belongings from her early life in Europe. Truly memorable. 10/10


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page