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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

1-20 of 42 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Why There Will Never Be a Coraline, Kubo or ParaNorman Sequel

23 August 2016 4:00 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Last weekend, the Portland-based stop motion company Laika debuted its fourth feature film, Kubo and the Two Strings, which opened in fourth place with $13.6 million. That tally is roughly on par with the company's first three films, Coraline ($16.8 million opening, $75.2 million domestic), ParaNorman ($14 million debut, $56 million domestic) and The Boxtrolls ($17.2 million first weekend, $50.8 million domestic). While these movies may not be box office hits, they have all been critical darlings, but don't expect the studio to turn their critical hits into sequels.

Laika was co-founded by Travis Knight, the son of Nike founder Phil Knight, who served as an animator and producer on the studio's first three films, before transitioning to direct Kubo and the Two Strings. While promoting Kubo, Travis Knight took part in an in-depth conversation about filmmaking in Los Angeles with filmmaker and historian John Canemaker, where he revealed that his studio will never make a sequel. »

- MovieWeb

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Laika CEO Explains Why He Takes “A Firm Stand Against Sequels”

22 August 2016 7:42 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

This past weekend, indie animation house Laika — the team behind “Coraline,” “ParaNorman,” and “The Boxtrolls” — released their latest effort, “Kubo And The Two Strings.” And while critically adored, the picture didn’t quite resonate the same way with audiences, with the film opening to very soft numbers. Box office aside, Laika has pursued a […]

The post Laika CEO Explains Why He Takes “A Firm Stand Against Sequels” appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Box Office: ‘Ben-Hur’ Flops With $11.4 Million, ‘Suicide Squad’ Still on Top

21 August 2016 8:30 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ben-Hur” derailed spectacularly at the multiplexes this weekend, as the latest attempt to revive the chariot racing epic opened to an anemic $11.4 million. That’s a disastrous result for the $100 million production, putting “Ben-Hur” in the ranks of the summer’s biggest flops.

Metr0-Goldwyn-Mayer and Paramount co-produced the remake of Lew Wallace’s novel “Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ”; the book was the basis for the 1959 blockbuster that followed Charlton Heston into the arena. Here Jack Huston took the reins as a Jewish prince who must exact his revenge after his adopted brother (Toby Kebbell) betrays him.

“This is the bomb of the summer,” said Jeff Bock, a box office analyst with Exhibitor Relations. “They went big and they went home.”

Although MGM put up roughly 80% of the budget for the film, its failure will be felt at Paramount. The studio has had a bad streak at the box office of late, »

- Brent Lang

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Exclusive Interview: Art Parkinson Talks Kubo And The Two Strings

21 August 2016 8:30 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

We’ve all been impressed with Laika Animation’s stop-motion technique, from Coraline to Paranorman, their films have dazzled us all, but the studio’s latest effort, Kubo and the Two Strings, is their most ambitious and beautiful film to date, a lush feast for the eyes coupled with a story that’s rich with culture. Not only that, but it also marks the directorial debut of Laika’s CEO, Travis Knight, and it’s clear this is a project that’s very close to his heart.

Kubo tells the story of a young Japanese boy (Art Parkinson) who takes care of his invalid mother in a cave above the sea. Every day, he goes into the local village and delights the denizens by telling elaborate stories about his late father, a great Samurai warrior, using paper origami figures and his magical musical instrument.

It’s not long though before »

- Kit Bowen

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Exclusive Interview: Travis Knight Talks Kubo And The Two Strings

20 August 2016 12:09 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

We’ve all been impressed with Laika Animation’s stop-motion technique, from Coraline to Paranorman, their films have dazzled us all, but the studio’s latest effort, Kubo and the Two Strings, is their most ambitious and beautiful film to date, a lush feast for the eyes coupled with a story that’s rich with culture. Not only that, but it also marks the directorial debut of Laika’s CEO, Travis Knight, and it’s clear this is a project that’s very close to his heart.

Kubo tells the story of a young Japanese boy who takes care of his invalid mother in a cave above the sea. Every day, he goes into the local village and delights the denizens by telling elaborate stories about his late father, a great Samurai warrior, using paper origami figures and his magical musical instrument.

It’s not long though before he’s confronted with his mysterious past, »

- Kit Bowen

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Kubo And The Two Strings Review

19 August 2016 7:31 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

When Laika Entertainment emerged on the scene in 2009 with Coraline, moviegoers and critics had no clue what to expect. Specializing in stop-motion, the studio seemed to grasp the medium like few before it truly had, leveraging its surreal yet tangible style to craft stories like no one else in the industry. However, that film was also bolstered by the involvement of The Nightmare Before Christmas director Henry Selick and the Neil Gaiman source material. The financial and critical success of Coraline could just as easily been a one-off fluke, a case in which the upstart studio got lucky with its first feature.

Yet, in the years since Coraline, Laika has maintained a high standard for stop-motion animated films, following its debut with Paranorman and The Boxtrolls in 2012 and 2014, respectively. Both films performed modestly at the box office but received similar critical acclaim and awards recognition as their predecessor. Now Laika »

- Robert Yaniz Jr.

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Support Hand-Made Films - Go See Laika's 'Kubo and the Two Strings'

19 August 2016 5:22 PM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

"Be bold. Be brave. Be epic." That's one of the taglines for this movie, but it could also easily be the motto of Laika, the animation studio that created this excellent animated adventure. Kubo and the Two Strings is now playing in theaters and it's a must see. Please, go see this movie in theaters while you can, and enjoy the heck out of it. Please go see it because stop-motion animation needs all the love and support it can get nowadays, especially in the form of tickets purchased to see this beautiful work of art in theaters. It's all hand-made, animated and painted and created by hand (in Portland, Oregon), and it's wonderful. I really can't recommend it enough and I'm very happy to go out of my way to write an entire post about seeing this. Kubo and the Two Strings is only Laika's fourth film, following The Boxtrolls, »

- Alex Billington

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Film Review: Fulfilling Emotion & Sumptuous Animation Awaits in ‘Kubo and the Two Strings’

19 August 2016 3:38 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – In our short lives, what do we most need? It’s a hard question to answer sometimes, but the new animated film “Kubo and the Two Strings” does a memorable job of answering the query. The journey of Kubo, like Dorothy in “The Wizard of Oz,” leads to a place where he needs to go.

Rating: 4.5/5.0

I don’t want to compare “Kubo” to anything else, although it was done by the same animation house (Laika Entertainment) that gave us “Coraline,” “ParaNorman” and “The Boxtrolls,” and succeeds by having a simple story akin to “Finding Dory.” But where it excels beyond all those examples is in a cumulative glory – it uses the simplicity of origami, Kabuki theater, the Samurai tradition and Japanese prints to establish a atmosphere that is sometimes stunning in its grace. While the character Kubo does have a typical good versus evil conundrum, the use of »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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'Kubo and the Two Strings': Meet the Man Behind 2016's Stop-Motion Epic

19 August 2016 7:30 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Gifted youngster Kubo is in a tough situation. He and his pals (a stern macaque and a goofy horned beetle cursed to assume the shape of a man) need to cross a turbulent ocean. There's no seafaring vessel in sight. It appears that all is lost, but the boy, unshaken, begins plucking out a tune on his magical shamisen, a traditional Japanese stringed instrument. In mere moments, a mighty ship has materialized from thousands of sheets of origami paper, ready to go. The young hero and his cohorts climb aboard, »

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Review: 'Kubo and the Two Strings' is a gorgeous and somber stop-motion fantasy

18 August 2016 6:10 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

While I think all animation is a magic trick that remains just as impressive now as the first time I saw it as a child, there are certainly levels of difficulty, and stop-motion animation is a special kind of lunacy. I’ve visited enough stop-motion sets to be awed by the skill set it requires for someone to effectively bring a character to life using such a difficult and painstaking method. It is sincerely meant then as praise when I say that I can’t imagine the single-minded pursuit of vision it took to bring Kubo and the Two Strings to life, and Travis Knight is, indeed, a madman. Travis Knight is, like Megan Ellison, a rich kid doing something profoundly interesting with the position of privilege they found themselves in. Ellison has fascinating taste as a producer, and she’s become a sort of life raft for filmmakers who »

- Drew McWeeny

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'Kubo and the Two Strings' Review: 2016's First Animated Masterpiece

18 August 2016 12:00 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

"If you must blink," a voice says over the soundtrack, "do it now." Consider this sound advice for anyone who's just entered the stop-motion world of this late-summer fantasy: Close your eyes for a nanosecond, and you might miss the sort of visually mind-blowing shot or part of a sweeping, how-the-hell-did-they-do-that set piece that causes Pavlovian salivating. Take, for example, the opening sequence that occurs right after that line, in which a woman in a boat is buffeted by angry, violent waves. What appears to be a giant tsunami starts »

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‘Kubo and the Two Strings’ Director Travis Knight on Akira Kurosawa’s Influence and Studio Ghibli’s Legacy

18 August 2016 11:40 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

When I last spoke with Travis Knight he was juggling the responsibilities of CEO and lead animator at his Portland-based animation studio, Laika. Now, with the company’s fourth feature, he is adding another to his resume: director. Kubo and the Two Strings, the year’s most gorgeous-looking animation thus far, arrives in theaters this week, and I had a chance to speak with him about his debut.

We discussed the wide-ranging influences on the film — from Kurosawa to manga comics — as well as his thoughts on voice acting, Studio Ghibli’s legacy, and much more. Check out the full conversation below.

The Film Stage: In the film, I saw inspiration from Akira Kurosawa’s The Hidden Fortress with this ragtag group of characters and the unlikely hero — and obviously that was inspiration for Star Wars, which I heard was one of your first movie-going experiences — so I’m curious »

- Jordan Raup

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Why You Shouldn’t Expect Any Sequels From Laika

18 August 2016 8:30 AM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Laika is about to unveil their fourth feature film to the world. Their latest adventure, Kubo and the Two Strings, is, like Coraline and ParaNorman, a self-contained story. Travis Knight‘s film doesn’t leave the door open for a sequel. In the hands of another studio, maybe it would, but Knight, who’s also the CEO & President of Laika, has […]

The post Why You Shouldn’t Expect Any Sequels From Laika appeared first on /Film. »

- Jack Giroux

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Interview: Director Travis Knight Strums ‘Kubo and the Two Strings’

17 August 2016 9:19 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – One of the great benefits of the new Golden Age of Animation has been the emergence of other studios…like Laika Entertainment, which has released “Coraline,” “ParaNorman” and “The Boxtrolls,” all nominated for Oscars. Travis Knight directs their latest stop-motion style animated film, “Kubo and the Two Strings.”

“Kubo” is rooted in Japanese samurai myth, but is a wholly new story. A baby loses an eye in a great battle, but his mother manages to save him. In exile, the two live near the ocean, and the baby grows to the boy Kubo, who supports his mother by going into the village with a magical string instrument. With it, he is able to conjure stories that use the style and look of paper folding origami. His magic is drawing attention, from both good and evil sorcery. Kubo ends up in a journey with a Monkey (voiced by Charlize Theron »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Kubo and the Two Strings Review: An Eye-Popping Visual Delight

12 August 2016 11:29 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Laika Studios, bar none the masters of stop motion 3D animation, are back in superb form with Kubo and the Two Strings. Their latest opus isn't quite on the same level as their finest, Coraline and ParaNorman, but is still a wonder to behold. Kubo is a visual delight, one of the few films this summer that must absolutely be seen in 3D. The plot loses a little steam in the third act, but the overall creativity of the film is enchanting. Kubo reminds us that not all wide release animated films have to be so vanilla in their look and approach.

Coming from Focus features, the story takes place in ancient Japan. Kubo (Art Parkinson) is a one-eyed boy who lives with his sickly mother in a mountain cave. Each day he takes his shamisen, a three-stringed instrument, to the village square. He supports his mother by singing wondrous tales of adventure and heroism. »

- MovieWeb

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Review: ‘Kubo And The Two Strings’ Is A Stop-Motion Masterpiece

12 August 2016 10:14 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Staggeringly beautiful and immensely true, the best animated film of 2016 — one of the year’s best films of any kind, really — is a stop-motion fable about a one-eyed boy in mythical Japan that was made by a team of gifted visionaries in an Oregon warehouse. Laika, the independent studio behind morbid enchantments like “Coraline” and “ParaNorman,” has already established itself as a formidable bulwark against the ever-accelerating onslaught of computer-generated 3D cartoons, but “Kubo and the Two Strings” makes even the most painstaking of their previous movies feel like a trial run.

A Kurosawa-inspired epic about the supreme power of storytelling, Laika’s largest movie to date is also their most emotionally acute. It may not be as grim as “Coraline” (though some of its villains are the stuff of nightmares), or as pungent as “The Boxtrolls” (though a sequence involving freshly diced fish will make you crave a post-screening »

- David Ehrlich

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Film Review: ‘Kubo and the Two Strings’

12 August 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In “Kubo and the Two Strings,” a brave, one-eyed Japanese boy is faced with divergent paths to immortality: Either he can surrender his remaining eye to his supernatural grandfather, the greedy Moon King, in exchange for eternal life, or he can stand up to the magical old-timer in a manner so courageous that his story will become the stuff of legend, never to be forgotten.

Kubo, who hides his eye patch behind long black bangs, chooses the latter option, of course, which makes perfect sense for the hero of the latest stop-motion marvel from Laika, the formula-averse animation studio responsible for such breathtakingly detailed movies as “Coraline” and “ParaNorman.” Expanding upon the charms of those director-driven projects, “Kubo” offers another ominous mission for a lucky young misfit, this one a dark, yet thrilling adventure quest that stands as the crowning achievement in Laika’s already impressive oeuvre — though its Asian setting, »

- Peter Debruge

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Now You Can Experience the Magic of Laika at Inventive New Exhibition

11 August 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In anticipation of its fourth stop-motion movie, “Kubo and the Two Strings,” Laika has mounted the first public exhibition of its hand-crafted puppets and sets at Universal Studios Hollywood’s Globe Theater (thru Sunday). “From Coraline to Kubo: A Magical Laika Experience” brings us closer to the tactile wonders that have been produced at the Portland studio for the last 10 years.

“You can see how the company’s grown and evolved as a community with all the artistic and technological innovations, but I also think that you see the evolution of an art form,” said Travis Knight, Laika CEO and lead artist who makes his directorial debut with “Kubo.”

Read More: ‘Kubo and the Two Strings’ Interactive Featurette: Explore the Vastlands of Laika’s Animated Adventure

“‘Coraline,’ which is where we began, was something of a seismic shift for stop-motion,” said Knight. “And as you go through, you can see »

- Bill Desowitz

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AnimationFix: ‘Kubo and the Two Strings’ gets a song debut and an exhibit opening

9 August 2016 5:20 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Your regular round-up of the latest animation news, from HitFix reporter Emily Rome Welcome to the first installment of AnimationFix, where on a regular basis I’ll supply you a round-up of recent animation news and my musings on both the hidden gems and the buzziest new footage and art from the world of toons. First treat for you today: Regina Spektor’s Japanese-influenced cover of “While My Guitar Gently Weeps,” recorded for stop-motion animation Kubo and the Two Strings. One of the film’s trailers previously gave us an early listen of the cover but just an instrumental section without Spektor’s vocals. Kubo and the Two Strings, a action adventure movie set in a world inspired by ancient Japan, is a samurai story that aims for an epic scale rarely seen in stop-motion. In the film, young Kubo plays a magical three-stringed instrument like a shamisen, a Japanese »

- Emily Rome

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Check Out The Interactive Youtube Map For Kubo And The Two Strings

3 August 2016 3:53 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Kubo’s quest stretches far and wide through the mystical realm of the Vastlands. With his protectors Monkey and Beetle by his side, Kubo unlocks more of his powers at every challenge, racing toward an epic clash with the dark side of his magical family.

From your desktop, visit kubomap.com to explore Kubo’s realm and dive into each location of his epic quest through an interactive map experience. This piece of content takes Youtube’s annotation tool and enables viewers to engage with the piece to go with Kubo on his quest.

Building upon a tradition which began seven years ago with acclaimed animation studio Laika’s first release Coraline, famed Nike designer Tinker Hatfield is readying the much-anticipated Kubo Xv sneaker to celebrate this month’s new Laika movie Kubo and the Two Strings.

The Kubo Xv follows in the footsteps of specially designed sneakers for each »

- Michelle McCue

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

1-20 of 42 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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