We begin at the sleepy port town of Livingstone, then journey up the Rio Dulce past forests of chicle. We stop to watch men tap the trees, harvest the sap, and load the product onto small ... See full summary »
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James A. FitzPatrick ...
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We begin at the sleepy port town of Livingstone, then journey up the Rio Dulce past forests of chicle. We stop to watch men tap the trees, harvest the sap, and load the product onto small planes. At a local market, we see indigenous life much as it's been for hundreds of years: Indians mix Catholicism with traditional practice, women live a difficult but uncomplaining life. Then it's back to the coast, to the prosperous Isla de Flores, a trading island. Lovely women sing us to the twilight, concluding our glimpses of Guatamala. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

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Documentary | Short

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9 February 1946 (USA)  »

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(RCA Sound System)

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(Technicolor)
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TravelTalks
24 September 2010 | by (Louisville, KY) – See all my reviews

Glimpses of Guatemala (1946)

** (out of 4)

Fair entry in MGM's TravelTalks series has James A. FitzPatrick going to Guatemala where we learn that their main income is rubber and bananas. We learn that the Indians named the place Guatemale, which to them translates to "full of trees" and that most still practice the Pagen religion. We take a quick trip down the "Sweet River" where we see a marketplace full of women who have recently started to dress closer to modern times while keeping up with their hard work, which usually includes them carrying baskets on their hands while their children are on their backs. Fans of the series will want to check this one out if they have the desire to see all of them (like I do) but I think most people will find it a chore to sit through. I never really got caught up in any of the stories being told and it just seemed like a lot of time was being wasted because they didn't have as much to work with. The Technicolor certainly adds a few nice touches but the print shown on TCM was pretty worn.


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