Bill Cunningham New York
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

11 items from 2016


New to Streaming: ‘Green Room,’ Albert Brooks, ‘Cemetery of Splendor,’ and More

1 July 2016 8:39 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Films of Albert Brooks

We can think of no better way to celebrate the holiday weekend then curling up with the hilarious, often touching films of Albert Brooks. All of his directorial features — Real Life, Modern Romance, Lost in America, Defending Your Life, Mother, The Muse, and Looking For Comedy in a Muslim World — have now been added to Netflix. What are you waiting for? »

- The Film Stage

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Bill Cunningham, Iconic Street Fashion Photographer & Subject of an Acclaimed Documentary, Dies at 87

26 June 2016 9:35 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Bill Cunningham, the iconic photographer whose ground-level view of New Yorkers’ fashion senses endeared him to the city for decades, died yesterday in Manhattan at 87. He had recently been hospitalized after suffering a stroke. A U.S. Army veteran and Harvard dropout, Cunningham first published a series of candid street photos for the New York Times in 1978; he soon became a mainstay of the paper, where he remained until his death.

Read More: Interview | Director Richard Press on Capturing the Elusive “Bill Cunningham

The photographer was both respected and beloved for his approach, which found him on the streets of Manhattan (often on his bicycle) photographing passersby whose taste in clothing caught his eye. After becoming famous for his work, Cunningham eschewed the very notion of his own celebrity. “Bill was an extraordinary man, his commitment and passion unparalleled, his gentleness and humility inspirational,” said Michele McNally, director of photography for the Times. »

- Michael Nordine

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Remembering Bill Cunningham as the Godfather of Street-Style Photography

25 June 2016 4:47 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Decades before Instagram and iPhones, Bill Cunningham was the godfather of street-style photography. The longtime fashion photographer for The New York Times who died Saturday at the age of 87 didn’t care about celebrity for celebrity’s sake. The latest movie and TV stars in the front row at fashion shows held no interest to him. He just cared about style, and anyone could have it. Even when he became a celebrity himself, after the release of Richard Press’ 2010 documentary film Bill Cunningham New York, he dodged the spotlight, covering his eyes when people asked to take photos or

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- Booth Moore

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Bill Cunningham, Legendary Fashion Photographer, Dies at 87

25 June 2016 4:07 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Bill Cunningham, the legendary street-style photographer for the New York Times, died on Saturday at the age of 87. According to the Times, Cunningham was hospitalized following a stroke, and died in New York City after nearly 40 years of photographing New York style and building a reputation as one of the most iconic fashion photojournalists in the world. The 2010 documentary “Bill Cunningham New York” by filmmaker Richard Press, featured some of the most influential people in culture and fashion singing the praises of Cunningham’s work. “We all get dressed for Bill,” Vogue editor Anna Wintour famously said of the »

- Reid Nakamura

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New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham has died by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2016-06-26 00:03:44

25 June 2016 4:03 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Bill Cunningham at Andrew Bolton's Manus x Machina exhibition Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The New York Times has reported that Bill Cunningham, the subject of Richard Press's 2010 documentary Bill Cunningham New York, died this Saturday, June 25, 2016 at the age of 87. He had been hospitalised recently after suffering a stroke.

I last saw Bill at The Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology press preview on the first Monday in May of this year. He was his usual spry self then, stalking the mannequins as he did when he came upon an interestingly dressed person on the streets of New York to photograph. He was dressed in his trademark uniform - blue jacket, khaki pants and black sneakers.

Bill Cunningham capturing L’Eléphant Blanc dress by Yves Saint Laurent Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Over the years you could tell that he was downtown »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Bill Cunningham Dies: The New York Times Fashion Photographer Was 87

25 June 2016 3:50 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Bill Cunningham, the New York Times‘ ubiquitous man-on-the-street photographer whose life and work was the subject of Richard Press’ acclaimed 2010 documentary Bill Cunningham New York, died Saturday in New York at 87. His death was confirmed by the Times, which disclosed that he’d recently been hospitalized following a stroke. Though technically a fashion photographer, Cunningham’s tireless work for the newspaper’s Style section was noted – and loved – for its social… »

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Iconic New York Times Fashion Photographer Bill Cunningham Has Died at 87

25 June 2016 3:05 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Bill Cunningham, who photographed fashion trends for the New York Times for almost 40 years, has died at 87, the newspaper confirmed. According to the paper, Cunningham died in New York City on Saturday after having recently been hospitalized for a stroke. The photographer was known for riding around the city on a bike, capturing pictures of trendy fashion items (recent entries included off-the-shoulder tops, ripped jeans and the color pink) to craft photo essays for his "On the Street" and "Evening Hours" columns. A 2009 profile of Cunningham in the New Yorker described these columns as "frequently playful" while still conveying "an »

- Andrea Park, @scandreapark

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Iconic New York Times Fashion Photographer Bill Cunningham Has Died at 87

25 June 2016 3:05 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Bill Cunningham, who photographed fashion trends for the New York Times for almost 40 years, has died at 87, the newspaper confirmed. According to the paper, Cunningham died in New York City on Saturday after having recently been hospitalized for a stroke. The photographer was known for riding around the city on a bike, capturing pictures of trendy fashion items (recent entries included off-the-shoulder tops, ripped jeans and the color pink) to craft photo essays for his "On the Street" and "Evening Hours" columns. A 2009 profile of Cunningham in the New Yorker described these columns as "frequently playful" while still conveying "an »

- Andrea Park, @scandreapark

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Every Movie and TV Show Expiring From Netflix in the Month of April

25 March 2016 5:30 PM, PDT | POPSUGAR | See recent BuzzSugar news »

Time to get your Netflix on, before it's too late. While there are a ton of exciting new titles hitting the streaming service in April, there are also a handful that are leaving for good. 2 Fast 2 Furious, Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle, Rock Star, and Nine to Five are among the month's casualties. Been waiting to binge on M*A*S*H? There's no time like the present! (Seriously though, it's leaving.) Take a look below; you've been warned. Expiring April 1 101 Dalmatians 2 Fast 2 Furious Along Came a Spider Along Came Polly Amistad Bad Johnson Bandslam Barefoot Contessa: Back to Basics Collection: Collection 1 Berkeley in the Sixties The Butcher's Wife Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle Chuck's Eat the Street Collection: Collection 1 Craigslist Joe Dear Genevieve Collection: Collection 1 Eureka: Season 4.0 Flashdance Hook Hotel Rwanda House of Wax I'll Be Home for Christmas The Inexplicable Universe with Neil deGrasse Tyson Léon: The Professional M »

- Maggie Pehanick

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What's Leaving Netflix: April 2016

22 March 2016 10:53 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

April is last call for some great movies on Netflix streaming, including "Flashdance," '"Leon: The Professional," and "Let The Right One In."

Also going bye-bye: several classic Frank Sinatra films including "Anchors Aweigh" (1945), "High Society" (1956), "On The Town" (1949), "Pal Joey" (1957) and "Some Came Running" (1958).

Here's a complete list of the movies and TV shows leaving Netflix in April:

Leaving April 1, 2016

"101 Dalmatians" (1996)

"2 Fast 2 Furious" (2003)

"Along Came a Spider" (2001)

"Along Came Polly" (2004)

"Amistad" (1997)

"Bad Johnson" (2014)

"Bandslam" (2009)

"Barefoot Contessa: Back to Basics Collection: Collection 1

"Berkeley in The Sixties" (1990)

"The Butcher's Wife" (1991)

"Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle" (2003)

"Chuck's Eat The Street Collection: Collection 1

"Craigslist Joe" (2012)

"Dear Genevieve Collection: Collection 1

"Eureka": Season 4.0

"Flashdance" (1983)

"Hook" (1991)

"Hotel Rwanda" (2004)

"House of Wax" (2005)

"I'll Be Home for Christmas" (1989)

"The Inexplicable Universe with Neil deGrasse Tyson" (2013)

"Leon: The Professional" (1994)

"M*A*S*H": Season 11

"Nanny McPhee" (2005)

"The Naked Gun 2 1/2: The Smell of Fear" (1991)

"Nine to Five »

- Sharon Knolle

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‘Everything Is Copy’: Jacob Bernstein Talks Nora Ephron’s Legacy and His Documentary Debut

21 March 2016 2:03 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

After Nora Ephron died in 2012, her son Jacob Bernstein knew he wanted to tell the story she never told. That mission became his first documentary feature, “Everything Is Copy,” which debuted at the New York Film Festival last year and premieres tonight on HBO.

Ephron’s life was famously well documented in her essays, books and even through certain biographical details that slipped into her films: the way Sally orders at restaurants in “When Harry Met Sally,” worshiping at the culinary altar of Julia Child in “Julie and Julia” and the sibling dynamics of “Hanging Up” — to name a few.

As Bernstein explains, this instinct to share intimate aspects of her private life in a public fashion can be traced back to a three-word mantra passed on to Ephron from her screenwriter mother, Phoebe Wolkind: “Everything is copy.” But when it came to the fatal disease that took her life, »

- Geoff Berkshire

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

11 items from 2016


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