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Hodejegerne (2011)

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An accomplished headhunter risks everything to obtain a valuable painting owned by a former mercenary.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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3,149 ( 554)
Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 8 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Synnøve Macody Lund ...
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Lotte (as Julie Ølgaard)
Kyrre Haugen Sydness ...
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Reidar Sørensen ...
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Joachim Rafaelsen ...
Mats Mogeland ...
Sunded
Gunnar Skramstad Johnsen ...
Monsen 1
Lars Skramstad Johnsen ...
Monsen 2
Signe Tynning ...
TV-vertinne
Nils Gunnar Lie ...
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Storyline

Roger Brown an Executive Headhunter and a part-time high end painting thief finds himself embroiled in a cat and mouse game when he tries to destroy Clas Greve's career prospects. However, Clas is a former member of a special tactical military force and will stop at nothing to ensure Roger is out of the picture and the job is his. Written by Paddy McManus

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The hunt is on.

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for bloody violence including some grisly images, strong sexual content and nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

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Country:

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Language:

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Release Date:

26 August 2011 (Norway)  »

Also Known As:

Headhunters  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

NOK 30,300,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$43,013 (USA) (27 April 2012)

Gross:

$1,196,752 (USA) (10 August 2012)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

, ,  »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(5.1 surround)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.39:1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Upon its release, the film has been sold to over 50 countries - a record for any Norwegian film. See more »

Goofs

After Roger Brown has pulled Ove from the lake and they both are in the car, driving to Ove's place, Ove is still dizzy and disoriented and keeps falling on Roger's shoulder. At one point, Roger pushes him away, Ove pukes a little, and then you see a hand pat Ove on the shoulder. That hand came from back seat, and doesn't belong to either Roger or Ove. See more »

Quotes

[First lines]
Roger: Rule #1: Make sure you know everything about those you visit. 2: Never spend more than 10 minutes. Every extra minute increases the chance of someone returning home unexpectedly. 3: Do not leave DNA traces. 4: Don't waste time getting an expensive reproduction. Even a simple forgery will go unnoticed for weeks. 5: Sooner or later, one of two things will happen. You find a work of art so valuable that you never need to worry again, or... you'll get caught.
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Connections

Featured in Maltin on Movies: Best and Worst Movies of 2012 (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

Sleep Ferrari
Universal Publishing Production Music
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User Reviews

 
The cut-throat world of Norwegian recruitment consultancy...
8 April 2012 | by (London, England) – See all my reviews

Touted as the next Stieg Larsson (or if you prefer, Norway's answer to Sweden's other major literary export, Henning Mankell), Jo Nesbo's Headhunters had already been earmarked for a (no doubt inferior) US remake before it was even released overseas.

Roger Brown (Aksel Hennie) is a 168cm recruitment consultant with a big house, a beautiful wife and an inferiority complex that drives him to moonlight as an art thief. The prosaically named protagonist is no Thomas Crown - he steals to keep a (wildly overleveraged) roof over his head and only pockets a measly 30% of the revenue from his ill-gotten gains. Even his appearance is counterintuitive - more bug eyed Steve Buscemi than suited and booted Bond. Even so, there's more going on here than meets the eye, but suffice to say that his real troubles start when he decides to go after The Big One - the retirement score that will put an end to his financial troubles and allow him to keep his ridiculously attractive wife in the style to which he's become accustomed.

To say anything more about the plot would be superfluous, but I will take a moment to admire the confidence of the director Morten Tyldum. Headhunters is, in a sense, typically Scandinavian - stark, brooding and with as much silence as dialogue. The style here serves the substance - the camera is often completely immobile, forcing the audience to concentrate on what's going on, a complete contrast to the craftsmanship/gimmickry more typical of glossy mainstream thrillers coming out of the US. Rather than spoonfeeding the audience every single clue, Headhunters isn't afraid to lead the unwitting watcher on a merry dance. Naturally the whole enterprise rests on the small but perfectly formed cast, particularly Hennie, with whom we slowly come to empathise, and the more typically suave Nikolaj Coaster-Waldau as the former exec with a murky past.

If Headhunters has a particular weakness, it's that it spends most of its time descending into increasingly dark (and occasionally graphically violent) territory, while occasionally veering into light hearted caper. This does feel slightly bewildering, but to be honest, it's a relative minor criticism. Headhunters is definitely worth catching (particularly given the woefully slim pickings over the past few months), if not now, then 6 months from now when it premieres on Film Four in the middle of the night. Scandinavians (and cinéastes with a penchant for Northern European film) may be used to this kind of thing, but for the rest of us it's a wonderfully welcome arctic blast through the land's tat filled cinema screens.


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