Rubber (2010) - News Poster

(2010)

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Review: "Nightmare Weekend" (1986); Dual Format Release From Vinegar Syndrome

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Ken (Dale Midkiff) and Bob (Preston Maybank) land in a propeller plane and speed off on motorcycles to a large mansion. Ken calls Julie Clingstone (Debbie Laster) via radio as Bob scales the side of the building. Julie wants him to give her access to “the mainframe” when suddenly, somewhere a puppet (yes, a puppet) begins yelling Danger! Danger!, obviously aware of the imminent intrusion. Edward Brake (Wellington Meffert) is sleeping in bed in the mansion while Bob takes off his necklace and lays it on the ledge after reaching the mansion’s roof. He rotates a parabolic dish and the puppet, operating some sort of a crude computer and using telepathic powers, makes the necklace turn into a sphere (think Phantasm). Bob starts to bleed from the face and falls to his death. The action breaks into the opening credits to “Nightmare” as sung by Miriam Stockley.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

‘Bitch’ Review: Marianna Palka’s Vicious Feminist Satire Has Plenty of Bark and Bite — Sundance 2017

  • Indiewire
‘Bitch’ Review: Marianna Palka’s Vicious Feminist Satire Has Plenty of Bark and Bite — Sundance 2017
There are plenty of stories about domestic housewives who grow tired of their oppressive routines, but none quite like Marianna Palka’s vicious feminist satire “Bitch,” in which the writer-director-star plays a woman who takes on the identity of a wild dog. It’s a blunt metaphor, but Palka transforms an absurd premise into a chilling look at the destruction of the nuclear family with a vivid, snarling vision driven by the propulsive energy of its biting critique.

Inspired by a real-life case study documented by psychologist R.D. Lang, “Bitch” follows the plight of afflicted matriarch Jill (Palka) and her clueless husband Bill (Palka regular Jason Ritter). The usually sweet-natured Ritter boldly plays against type, initially coming across as an “American Psycho”-like creep who sleeps with his secretary and buries himself in the office, leaving the care of his three young children to his clearly unstable wife. When she snaps,
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Daniel Radcliffe & Paul Dano Have A Surreal Fight For Survival In ‘Swiss Army Man’ [Review]

Daniel Radcliffe is a dead body that gives life in the infinitely strange and terminally unsatisfying “Swiss Army Man.” The feature directorial debut from inventive and successful music video directors the Daniels (real names: Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinert) teams Radcliffe with Paul Dano. It edges into the non-sequitur weirdness of Quentin Dupieux (“Rubber,” “Wrong“) […]

The post Daniel Radcliffe & Paul Dano Have A Surreal Fight For Survival In ‘Swiss Army Man’ [Review] appeared first on The Playlist.
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Sundance Review: 'Swiss Army Man' Starring Paul Dano, Daniel Radcliffe & Mary Elizabeth Winstead

  • The Playlist
Daniel Radcliffe is a dead body that gives life in the infinitely strange and terminally unsatisfying "Swiss Army Man." The feature directorial debut from inventive and successful music video directors the Daniels (real names: Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinert) teams Radcliffe with Paul Dano. It edges into the non-sequitur weirdness of Quentin Dupieux ("Rubber," "Wrong") and the fantastical romantic yearning of Michel Gondry ("Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind") but doesn't persuasively mint a uniquely "Daniels" brand of oddity. "Swiss Army Man" is a big swing — there's no denying the risk in putting two well-known actors in a film where one plays a barely-mobile corpse — but also a big whiff that rarely connects its characters and situations to humor or empathy. Read More: Sundance Exclusive: Photos Of 'Swiss Army Man' Starring Paul Dano, Daniel Radcliffe, And Mary Elizabeth Winstead Dano...
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25 great directors working outside mainstream cinema

  • Den of Geek
Meet some of the best directors working today, who haven't gone down the blockbuster movie route...

Ever find it a bit lame when the same big name directors get kicked around for every high profile project? Christopher Nolan, Jj Abrams, maybe the Russo Brothers? With so much focus on blockbuster films these days, getting a major franchise job seems like the main acknowledgement of success for a filmmaker. And yes, both the financial and creative rewards can be great. But there are plenty of other directors out there, doing their own thing, from art house auteurs to Dtv action specialists.

Here are 25 examples.

Lee Hardcastle

Even if you don’t know his name, you’ve probably seen Lee Hardcastle’s ultraviolent claymations shared on social media. He first started getting noticed for his two-minute remake of The Thing, starring the famous stop motion penguin Pingu. Far from just a cheap one-joke mash-up,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Review: Reality

When Quentin Dupieux arrived on the scene with his surreal (and Very weird)”slasher tire” film, Rubber, it was instantly apparent that this was a filmmaker who had absolutely no intention in making a point A to point B kind of film. It was a breath of fresh air, and his following films, Wrong, Wrong Cops both full explored that marriage of humor, satire and an imagination that feels almost like it was straight from the mind of a child. Continuing that approach once again, in in the most effective way to date, Dupieux’s Reality (which opened in NY/VOD on May 1st and here in La on May 15th via IFC Films) is quite easily Dupieux’s most accomplished piece of work to date, a laugh out loud surrealist comedy filled to the brim with wit and intelligence.

A series of scenes involving characters that seemingly have nothing
See full article at Icons of Fright »

Watch: Quentin Dupieux Narrates a Meta-Movie Moment From His Brain-Bending 'Reality' (Video)

Watch: Quentin Dupieux Narrates a Meta-Movie Moment From His Brain-Bending 'Reality' (Video)
"Reality" unfolds as a tapestry of very strange story strands that casually intersect and bleed into each other. They're hard to parse, which makes Quentin Dupieux's latest oddity a uniquely playful kind of moviegoing experience, much like his earlier cult comedies "Rubber" (2010) and "Wrong" (2012). It goes something like this: A precocious little girl named Reality (Kyla Kenedy) finds a videotape inside the guts of a hog her father has slaughtered; a cooking show host (Jon Heder of "Napoleon Dynamite") dressed in a giant rat suit has a form of eczema only he can see; French camera-operator Jason (Alain Chabat) wants to make a film about murderous television sets; and Reality's school principal (Eric Wareheim) is plagued by dreams of cross-dressing. Are these episodic flights of fantasy reality, or wish-fulfillment? Though shot around Los Angeles, where Dupieux is now based, the film exists somewhere outside time and place, similar to.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Quentin Dupieux Explains Why He Doesn't Like Being Compared to David Lynch

  • Indiewire
Quentin Dupieux Explains Why He Doesn't Like Being Compared to David Lynch
Read More: Watch: First International Trailer For Quentin Dupieux's Oddball 'Reality' [Editor's Note: This post is presented in partnership with Time Warner Cable Movies On Demand in support of Indie Film Month. Today's pick, "Ride," is available now On Demand.] Since his unrepentantly weird "Rubber" in 2010, Quentin Dupieux has obsessively returned to the same themes and motifs in his films: the art and craft of filmmaking; voyeurism; artifice and manipulating viewers; and, most of all, dreams. The house musician and filmmaker makes films that perform self-vivisections, cutting themselves open and examining their own innards. His newest, "Reality," depicts a filmmaker struggling with inspiration. It also has Jon Heder in a giant rat suit. Dupieux writes, edits, shoots, directs, and—until "Reality"—scores all of his films, making him a true auteur. Indiewire sat down with the French filmmaker to talk about movies, music and...
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: Quentin Dupieux's Reality, Not Just Another Headscratcher

French DJ-cum-filmmaker Quentin Dupieux, aka Mr.Oizo, invaded the cinema landscape rather abruptly through his Dadaistic effort Rubber, following a killing tire in a twisted slasher formula. The comic element aside, Dupieux knew what he was up to since the first minute, not only in the opening scene of Rubber, featuring its unforgettable manifesto "No Reason," but also in his films to come. (He had previously tried his hand at filmmaking in the unfinished Nonfilm and the adequately bizarre comedy Steak.)Rubber marked a new chapter in the filmmaker´s career building his own topsy-turvy world. Wrong demonstrated his potential, not only through the absolutely ridiculous story of a dog-obsessed protagonist but mostly through the stylistic and formal solutions that blended into Dupieux´s personally-bred brand of poetics. The expansion...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Reality Review

French filmmaker Quentin Dupieux has made a career out of blurring the lines between ambition and utter lunacy, vouching for those who argue that beauty and chaos go hand-in-hand. I’ll confess that Rubber and Wrong hold a special place in my heart, but his latest film, aptly titled Reality, might be where I hop off this gonzo train of absurd, nonconforming, dreamlike voyeurism. As you can assume, Dupieux’s hazily overexposed interpretation of reality is anything but “normal,” as we’re once again caught in multiple character arcs that are pieced together by – well, I can finally say I have no ‘effing idea how everything comes together. Rubber addresses cinematic cultures, and Wrong chases a dog, but Reality introduces a nightmare that we never wake up from no matter how hard we try.

There’s no point in explaining a plot that’s non-existent, but here’s the short-hand version.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Reality (Réalité) | Review

Quentin Dupieux's Reality is the stream of consciousness of a mad cinematic scientist, intertwining the perspectives of Jason (Alain Chabat), Reality (Kyla Kenedy), Zog (John Glover), and Henri (Eric Wareheim) to the point of sheer mindfuckery. While keeping with the absurdist tendencies of Rubber and Wrong, Reality is heavily dosed with the meandering dream logic of surrealism. Showcased in a brilliant menagerie of dreams, films-within-films and presumed realities, Reality abides by Dupieux's mantra of "no reason" as it fluidly contorts into a rat's nest of narrative threads, simultaneously unfolding and folding within itself like a M. C. Escher illustration.
See full article at SmellsLikeScreenSpirit »

Review: Quentin Dupieux's 'Reality' Is A Mind-Itch Worth Scratching

  • The Playlist
If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. And if it is broke, no harm in breaking it further. After the modest, cultier-than-thou successes of killer tire movie “Rubber” and lost dog odyssey “Wrong,” perpetual student filmmaker Quentin Dupieux returns with another iteration of his very narrowly defined field of expertise with “Reality” (you probably guessed that is a mildly ironic title). Surprisingly though, while he’s ploughing the same old furrow of deadpan sight gags with the color grade set to "stonewash" and disjointed moments of droll absurdity, “Reality,” if you're in the right frame of mind, is actually pretty good fun, thanks to a clutch of enjoyable performances and a healthy dose of not taking itself even remotely seriously. In the film's puzzle-box structure, justified by essentially being set in a network of dreams and movies (and dreams-within-dreams and movies-within-dreams-within-movies), very occasionally Dupieux puts together something that adds up to slightly more.
See full article at The Playlist »

Watch the trailer for Quentin Dupieux’s Reality

A trailer has arrived online for French filmmaker Quentin Dupieux’s (Rubber) latest film Reality starring Alain Chabat and Jon Heder, check it out below after the official synopsis…

Jason, a quiet cameraman, dreams of directing his first horror movie. Bob Marshall, a wealthy producer, accepts to finance his movie on one condition : Jason has 48 hours to find the best scream in the history of film. During his search, Jason gradually gets lost in a nightmare.

Reality features a cast that also includes Jonathan Lambert, Élodie Bouchez, Kyla Kenedy, John Glover and Eric Wareheim.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Surreal ‘Reality’ from ‘Rubber’ director Quentin Dupieux gets a trailer

Quentin Dupieux broke out onto the film scene with his wacko cult hit Rubber, a tongue-in-cheek horror story about a killer car tire. Now he’s made four films in the last five years, and his latest, which Dupieux has been writing on and off while making his other films, has just received a trailer that deliberately seeks to defy explanation.

Reality stars Alain Chabat as a film director given 48 hours to find the perfect scream, or shriek of pain, before he receives funding for his schlocky horror film. In our review from back in October, we compared it to David Lynch and older French surrealist films, admiring its absurdist, comedic charms. Here’s the log line from IMDb:

A wanna-be director is given 48 hours by a producer to find the best groan of pain, worthy of an Oscar, as the only condition to back his film.

Jon Heder and
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Watch: The Nightmare Begins In U.S. For Quentin Dupieux's Totally Weird 'Reality'

  • The Playlist
It's not every day that you'd expect to find the likes of Alain Chabat, Jon Heder and Eric Wareheim in the same movie. Then again, films from French filmmaker Quentin Dupieux don't come down the pike every day. Hold on to your hats —your Friday is about to get pretty weird. From the man who brought you "Rubber" and "Wrong Cops" comes a picture about the business of making movies. When young cameraman Jason decides to make a horror movie, he finds a benefactor in a wealthy producer who agrees to help him out on one condition: he must find the most perfect scream in 48 hours. And so begins Jason's journey, which turns into the stuff of nightmares in which reality and surreality blend and overlap. "Reality" opens in limited release and on VOD on May 8th. Watch below.
See full article at The Playlist »

Rendez-vous With French Cinema 2015: A Treasure Trove For Francophiles

Rendez-vous with French Cinema, a co-presentation of Film Society of Lincoln Center and Unifrance Films, has become a de facto film festival for francophiles over the years. A showcase of contemporary French cinema, this year's lineup includes 22 features and four short films making their New York, U.S., or North American premieres. Celebrating its 20th year, Rendez-vous opens with Benoit Jacquot (Farewell My Queen)'s 3 Hearts, starring Charlotte Gainsbourg, Chiara Mastroianni and Catherine Deneuve and closes with Quentin Dupieux (Rubber)'s new film Reality. The returning notable directors include - Jacquot, André Téchiné, Cedric Kahn, Jean-Paul Civeyrac and Christophe Honoré. The ever-diverse lineup includes gritty policiers (The Connection, Next Time I'll Aim for the Heart, SK1), comedies (Gaby Baby Doll, Reality) and several films starring Catherine...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

First poster & image from the ‘Martyrs’ remake

Coming courtesy of Dread Central, here’s the first image and poster from the Goetz Brothers’ remake of Pascal Laugier’s Martyrs – which has already completed filming (it’s a rarity these days to only hear about a movie After it’s finished) – the latest film from the uber-prolific Blumhouse Productions.

The remake stars Bailey Noble (True Blood) and Troian Bellisario (Pretty Little Liars). Martyrs also features Kate Burton (Stay, Big Trouble in Little China) and Blake Robbins (Rubber). The script comes fromMark L. Smith whose previous work includes Vacancy, The Hole and The Revenant.

Ten-year-old Lucie flees from the isolated warehouse where she has been held prisoner. Deeply traumatized, she is plagued by awful night terrors at the orphanage that takes her in. Her only comfort comes from Anna, a girl her own age. Nearly a decade later and still haunted by demons, Lucie finally tracks down the family that tortured her.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Rotterdam 2015: Reality, Not Just Another Headscratcher By Dupieux

French DJ-cum-filmmaker Quentin Dupieux, aka Mr.Oizo, invaded the cinema landscape rather abruptly through his Dadaistic effort Rubber, following a killing tire in a twisted slasher formula. The comic element aside, Dupieux knew what he was up to since the first minute, not only in the opening scene of Rubber, featuring its unforgettable manifesto "No Reason," but also in his films to come. (He had previously tried his hand at filmmaking in the unfinished Nonfilm and the adequately bizarre comedy Steak.)Rubber marked a new chapter in the filmmaker´s career building his own topsy-turvy world. Wrong demonstrated his potential, not only through the absolutely ridiculous story of a dog-obsessed protagonist but mostly through the stylistic and formal solutions that blended into Dupieux´s personally-bred brand of poetics. The expansion...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Watch The International Trailer For Rubber Director's Realite!

Whether you love him or hate him there's no arguing the fact that there's simply nobody else quite like Rubber and Wrong director Quentin Dupieux these days. The musician turned director has been baffling and / or delighting audiences around the globe with his drily absurd sense of humor for a good few years now and he did the same at the Venice film festival this past year when he premiered his latest effort, Realite.Boasting an international cast that includes Alain Chabat, Eric Wareheim and Napoleon Dynamite's Jon Heder. As usual for Dupieux this one resists meaningful synopsis - plot points really aren't the point of a Dupieux film - but here's how Venice described it:Jason, a quiet cameraman, dreams of directing his first horror...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Watch: First International Trailer For Quentin Dupieux's Oddball 'Reality'

  • The Playlist
There's the world of movies, then there's the world of movies as seen through the eyes of Quentin Dupieux. His films have concerned killer tires ("Rubber"), missing dogs ("Wrong"), and bad cops ("Wrong Cops"), and as you might've guessed, they're far from grounded. Odd, unique, and distinctly his own, you either let Dupieux take you by the hand, or get left far behind. And that goes for his latest "Reality," which is coming off the 2014 festival circuit and into cinemas in France, and the first international trailer has arrived. Featuring an unlikely cast that includes notable French thesp Alain Chabat, American comedy weirdo Eric Wareheim, and Napolean Dynamite himself Jon Heder, the story follows a cameraman who is given the chance to direct his first horror movie, thanks to the kindness of a wealthy producer. The catch? He has 48 hours to find the perfect scream. Welcome to the world of Quentin Dupieux.
See full article at The Playlist »
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