IMDb > Rubber (2010)
Rubber
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Rubber (2010) More at IMDbPro »

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Rubber -- When Robert, an inanimate tire, discovers his destructive telepathic powers, he soon sets his sights on a desert town; in particular, a mysterious woman becomes his obsession.

Overview

User Rating:
5.8/10   19,649 votes »
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Up 60% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Quentin Dupieux (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Rubber on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
10 November 2010 (France) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Are You Tired of the Expected? See more »
Plot:
When Robert, a tire, discovers his destructive telepathic powers, he soon sets his sights on a desert town; in particular, a mysterious woman becomes his obsession. | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
5 wins & 1 nomination See more »
NewsDesk:
(455 articles)
"Wrong Cops" Tries Too Hard to Get it Right
 (From JustPressPlay. 17 May 2014, 8:38 PM, PDT)

Contracted (2013) Review
 (From MoreHorror. 12 April 2014, 12:28 AM, PDT)

Contracted Spreads the Infection to Home Video
 (From Dread Central. 24 February 2014, 12:39 PM, PST)

User Reviews:
A horror film about technique and style See more (145 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Stephen Spinella ... Lieutenant Chad

Jack Plotnick ... Accountant

Wings Hauser ... Man in wheelchair

Roxane Mesquida ... Sheila

Ethan Cohn ... Film buff Ethan

Charley Koontz ... Film buff Charley

Daniel Quinn ... Dad

Devin Brochu ... Son

Hayley Holmes ... Teenager Cindy

Haley Ramm ... Teenager Fiona
Cecelia Antoinette ... Black woman
David Bowe ... M. Hughes

Remy Thorne ... Zach (as Remi Thorne)

Tara Jean O'Brien ... Cleaning Lady (as Tara O'Brien)

Thomas F. Duffy ... Cop Xavier
Pete Dicecco ... Cop Luke (as Pete Di Cecco)

James Parks ... Cop Doug

Courtenay Taylor ... Cop Denise (as Courtenay K. Taylor)

Blake Robbins ... Cop Eric
Michael Ross ... Truck driver
Gaspard Augé ... Hitchhiker
Pedro Winter ... Tires burner
Goodyear ... Robert (as Robert)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Gayle Kate ... Movie Buff Spectator (uncredited)
Eloy Lara ... Paramedic (uncredited)
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Directed by
Quentin Dupieux 
 
Writing credits
Quentin Dupieux (written by)

Produced by
Julien Berlan .... producer
Gregory Bernard .... producer
Josef Lieck .... associate producer
Josef Lieck .... line producer
Kevin Van Der Meiren .... supervising producer (as Kevos Van Der Meiren)
 
Original Music by
Gaspard Augé 
Quentin Dupieux  (as Mr. Oizo)
 
Cinematography by
Quentin Dupieux 
 
Film Editing by
Quentin Dupieux 
 
Casting by
Andy Henry 
Donna Morong 
Juliette Ménager 
 
Art Direction by
Zach Bangma 
 
Costume Design by
Jamie Redwood  (as Jamie Bresnan)
 
Makeup Department
Akiko Matsumoto .... key makeup artist
Yusuke Tateishi .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Grégory Bernard .... assistant unit manager
T. Scott Keiner .... unit production manager
Kevin Van Der Meiren .... post-production supervisor (as Kevos Van Der Meiren)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Karla Carnewal .... second assistant director
Ian J. Putnam .... first assistant director
 
Art Department
Nathan Amondson .... visual consultant
 
Sound Department
Stéphane De Rocquigny .... sound mixer
Valérie Deloof .... sound editor
Tim D. Lloyd .... boom operator
Zsolt Magyar .... sound mixer
Gadou Naudin .... foley artist
 
Special Effects by
Wayne Beauchamp .... pyrotechnician
Marco Castillo .... special effects technician
Milan Jancic .... special effects technician
Valek Sykes .... puppeteer
Valek Sykes .... special effects supervisor
Tom Talmon .... special mechanical design
 
Visual Effects by
Fabien Feintrenie .... title designer
 
Stunts
Pete Dicecco .... stunt driver
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Quentin Dupieux .... camera operator
Walter Laudin .... gaffer
Caroline Lehello .... first assistant camera
Kevin Van Der Meiren .... second assistant camera (as Kevos Van Der Meiren)
 
Casting Department
Shaunessy James Quinn .... extras casting
Phill Zagajewski .... executive in charge of casting
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Lauren Nakagawa .... costume assistant
 
Editorial Department
Aurélien Guégan .... post-production consultant
Hélène Sevaux .... digital image technician
Kevin Van Der Meiren .... assistant editor (as Kevos Van Der Meiren)
Kevin Van Der Meiren .... post-production coordinator (as Kevos Van Der Meiren)
 
Music Department
Lola Zaidline .... writer & singer: additional music
 
Transportation Department
Hugo Ocana .... transportation co-captain
Tony Ruiz .... transportation co-captain
 
Other crew
Sarah Clifford .... animal supplier
Sarah Clifford .... insect wrangler
Tonto Goldstein .... production accountant
Tara Jean O'Brien .... production coordinator (as Tara O'Brien)
Samantha Schwartz .... production assistant
Wednesday Standley .... production coordinator
Kevin Van Der Meiren .... script supervisor (as Kevos Van Der Meiren)
Phill Zagajewski .... story editor
 
Thanks
Edward McGurn .... grateful thanks
Olivier Père .... thanks
Chrys Wong .... special thanks
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
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Additional Details

Also Known As:
MPAA:
Rated R for some violent images and language
Runtime:
82 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Australia:MA (2010) | Canada:14A (Manitoba/Ontario) | Canada:G (Québec) | Germany:16 | Hong Kong:III (film festival rating) | Japan:R15+ | Portugal:M/16 | Singapore:M18 | UK:15 | USA:R (certificate #46682)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
One of the Spectators is played by Daniel Quinn, who starred in Scanner Cop (1994) (V) as a man who could make people's heads explode with his mind, just as the tire does in this film.See more »
Goofs:
Audio/visual unsynchronized: When the tire is watching Nascar on the TV, the sound we hear is from a different series of motor-racing; possibly Formula 1.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Lieutenant Chad:In the Steven Spielberg movie E.T., why is the alien brown? No reason. In Love Story, why do the two characters fall madly in love with each other? No reason. In Oliver Stone's JFK, why is the President suddenly assassinated by some stranger? No reason. In the excellent Chain Saw Massacre by Tobe Hooper, why don't we ever see the characters go to the bathroom or wash their hands like people do in real life? Absolutely no reason. Worse, in The Pianist by Polanski, how come this guy has to hide and live like a bum when he plays the piano so well? Once again the answer is, no reason. I could go on for hours with more examples. The list is endless. You probably never gave it a thought, but all great films, without exception, contain an important element of no reason. And you know why? Because life itself is filled with no reason. Why can't we see the air all around us? No reason. Why are we always thinking? No reason. Why do some people love sausages and other people hate sausages? No fucking reason.
Cop Xavier:[honks the horn] Come on! Don't waste your time explaining that garbage. Let's go!
Lieutenant Chad:Just a minute, let me finish.
[looks back at the audience]
Lieutenant Chad:Ladies, gentlemen, the film you are about to see today is an homage to the "no reason" - that most powerful element of style.
[pours his glass of water on the ground before getting back into the trunk of the police car]
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Just Don't Want To Be LonelySee more »

FAQ

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71 out of 114 people found the following review useful.
A horror film about technique and style, 21 January 2011
Author: Da-Ant from Canada

"The film you are about to see is an homage to 'no reason', that most powerful element of style." This is the manifesto that opens Rubber, delivered directly to the audience in a breaking of the fourth wall that is somewhat like taking a pound of dynamite to a pane of glass.

Rubber is a "horror" film about a black rubber car tyre that kills people by making their heads explode. With telepathy. And when I say "horror" I do of course mean "side-splittingly funny, pitch black, absurdist comedy." The opening scenes of Rubber are a deliberate assault on the separation between the audience and the film. Normally the opening sequence of a film seeks to bring you into the world of the film; the audience is encouraged to step through the silver screen and forget about the real world for the duration of the story. Rubber perverts these expectations. The film comes crashing through the screen, into the world of the audience. It reminds us at every turn that we are watching a film, and indeed that the very act of our watching is what makes the film happen.

There are actually two plot lines at work in Rubber. The first concerns a murderous inanimate object , an innocent but spirited young woman on the run from some troubled element of her past, and the county sheriff on the trail of the vulcanised psychopath. This is ostensibly the core thread of the movie, but we soon see that this action only serves as a literal distraction for the audience, who exist in the film, embodied as actual participants, though ones who remain clearly and distinctly removed from the action, watching events at a distance through field glasses. This distraction covers the real story, that of the sheriff, who is in fact the antagonist of the story, attempting to kill off the audience (through the manoeuvrings of his toady, The Accountant) so that the film can end and he can go home.

The movie within the movie begins with a sequence that could have come straight from Leone's scrapbook. A man lies face down in a desert. Slowly, he rises, and shakes himself off. He staggers along, and falls. He rises again, and continues to stagger on, through the endless desert. Except that the "man" in question is a rubber tyre (Roger, according to the credits). This is the brilliance of Rubber; that it can appropriate the cinematic language that we are so familiar with, and apply it to situations that cannot be anything but utterly absurd.

Other scenes lift from a variety of sources, including a sequence that takes place in what is clearly the Bates hotel from the original Psycho. For a film that claims to be dedicated to meaninglessness, it is ironic that not a single frame is without a clear purpose. Every shot serves to either ensconce us in the impossible world of a rubber tyre who murders people, or tear us forcibly out of it, as we return repeatedly to the plight of the poor audience, stranded in the desert with no food, and prey to depredations of a murderous cast member, or possibly character. It's never clear whether the antagonist is an actor who wants to stop playing his role, or a character in a story who wants the story itself to end; the latter appeals, if only for its deeply apocalyptic subtext. When the film ends, where does the character go?).

Even the choice of the supposed villain must have taken a great deal of thought. It's such an elegant choice; an object capable of locomotion, but without moving parts to cutely animate. Something that has an element of menace (after all, a tyre, attached to a vehicle, can do a lot of damage), but is also innately ridiculous. An object that can fulfill the emotive needs of the film yet has remarkably little capacity to emote. Consider that all this thing can do is roll forward, roll backwards, fall over, stand up, and vibrate its sides. That's a sum total of five things you can ask your star to do for you on screen. As a film-making challenge alone, that's a spectacular feat to undertake.

I could go on for days about the tiniest of "seemingly irrelevant but incredibly well thought out" details that litter the film. That Rubber invites such complex readings is a testament to the subtlety that underlies the simple brilliance of the film itself. Whatever you may think about the subtext and meaning of this supposedly meaningless film, it doesn't really matter if Rubber "means" anything or not, because whatever else it may be, the film is absolutely hilarious. We are talking literal "tears of laughter" funny here.

Quentin Dupieux provides us with excellent cinematography, full of lingering establishing shots and vivid, often deliberately off-frame close-ups, and the cast all turn in magnificent performances, especially Jack Plotnick, who demonstrates the ability to carry a scene from laugh out loud funny to deeply uncomfortable in a matter of seconds. The script is tightly written, and the humour builds on itself in layers, rising from the initial "WTF?" moments of nervous laughter to the farcical crescendo of the closing scenes, where every element of the film collides in a scene that, if nothing else, will mean that I'll never look at tricycles the same way again.

I could continue to pick at Rubber, pulling out detail after detail, examining each one in turn to find new facets, new thoughts and revelations. None of that really matters though; what you need to know is that Rubber is the strangest, funniest, and most dazzlingly original film you will see this year, and considering that Scott Pilgrim vs The World just came out, that's one hell of an achievement.

Originally from http://www.rgbfilter.com/?p=9032

Was the above review useful to you?
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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Rubber (2010)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Well, it's finally happened... phoenix39
Worst movie ever orkanolgun2
Worst Movie Ever? Seriously? macmets-923-677010
Would have worked better as a video game yozorkaz
No Reason? deason
Is this movie so terrible that it's actually good? R_o_a_r
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