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Downton Abbey (TV Series 2010– ) Poster

(2010– )

Trivia

According to Julian Fellowes, the parts played by Hugh Bonneville, Brendan Coyle and Maggie Smith were written for the actors that played them.
As of 2013, Downton Abbey is the highest rated PBS "Masterpiece" drama series of all time, seen by an estimated 120 million viewers in 200 countries and regions.
The series is filmed at Highclere Castle, set on 1,000 acres in West Berkshires, Hampshire--a landmark estate owned by the Carnarvon family since the late 17th century. It's open to the public during the summer for $27 admission fee and can also be rented for weddings and other events. The kitchen and servants' quarters, however, are shot in a London studio because those parts of Highclere have been modernized.
The real estate that "plays" Downton Abbey, Highclere Castle, has been the home of the Carnarvon family since 1679. In 1922, George Herbert, the 5th Earl of Carnarvon, co-discovered the Tomb of the Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun. On the show, the names of the Earl of Grantham's beloved dogs, Isis and Pharaoh, are nods to the real castle's connection to Egyptian history.
As a guest on Late Show with David Letterman: Episode #19.88 (2012), Michelle Dockery revealed that, given her working class background, had she been affiliated in any way with society depicted in the story's time frame, she would most likely have been her housemaid Anna rather than the aristocratic Lady Mary Crawley she portrays so convincingly in the series.
Julian Fellowes' inspiration for his original story came from authors such as Edith Wharton ("The Buccaneers") and close friend Henry James's general research of the novel's time period and subject matter. He also sourced the 1989 book "To Marry an English Lord". Elizabeth McGovern's character Cora, was the first one that he developed.
According to Jessica Fellowes' book, "The World of Downton Abbey" (2011), the acclaimed TV series cost an average of £1 million per episode to produce.
In 2012, it became the most nominated British TV series in the history of the Emmys, with 16 Emmy nominations at The 64th Primetime Emmy Awards (2012).
Gillian Anderson reportedly turned down the part of Lady Grantham.
In the 2012 book "The Chronicles of Downton Abbey: A New Era," authors Jessica Fellowes and Matthew Sturgis clarify that although Cora's late father (who has been identified on the show as Isidore Levinson, a dry-goods magnate from Cincinnati, Ohio) was Jewish, her mother, Martha, was Episcopalian and raised Cora likewise.
When the first series was broadcast, Julian Fellowes, the creator and executive producer, was annoyed at newspaper articles which printed viewers' criticisms of anachronisms (e.g. TV aerials and double yellow lines in shot), especially the newspapers' assumptions that *all* such criticisms were valid - for example the word "boyfriend" was wrongly thought to be an anachronism when in fact it appeared in print in 1889, long before the time when Downton Abbey was set. At the time, he said "They think to show how smart they are by picking holes in the programme to promote their own poshness and to show that their knowledge is greater than your knowledge". However in an article in Radio Times on 17 September 2011, coinciding with the start of the second series, Fellowes apologised and commented "I behaved rather badly by getting the hump".
Initially some British viewers accused creator Julian Fellowes of plagiarism - borrowing ideas from Louisa May Alcott's classic novel 'Little Women.' The BBC even produced a spoof of the show starring Kim Cattrall.
It was reported that Steven Waddington auditioned for the part of Bates.
David Weston was seen for the role of Charles Grigg but thought too old.

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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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