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The Drop
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Reviews & Ratings for
The Drop More at IMDbPro »

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Index 13 reviews in total 

27 out of 37 people found the following review useful:

An expertly crafted film with fantastic performances

9/10
Author: trublu215 from United States
7 September 2014

The Drop is a dark, brooding crime film starring Tom Hardy and the late James Gandolfini. Directed by Mikaël Roskam, this film focuses on Bob, a low level shy bartender at Cousin Marv's. The bar is a "drop bar" in which the mob's money gets laundered there. While this does sound like the story to The Drop, it isn't. The film is much more a character study first about Bob and his back story. What this film does beautifully is show the progression of the story strictly through casual dialog, explaining why Bob is the way he is. Our first clue to Bob's back story is a subtle hint as he attends church and does not accept the communion offering. A recurring theme throughout the film is the idea of how a sin can weigh your conscious down. Some of this is heavy handed and others are very subtle and mostly through something as small as a glare from Tom Hardy or a sigh from James Gandolfini. Quite frankly, without these amazing performances from everyone across the board, this film would more than likely sink after the first 30 minutes. The entire cast from Tom Hardy, James Gandolfini, Noomi Repace, Matthias Schoenaerts, John Ortiz, they are all in top form here. There is not one hollow or fake performance, they are all pitch perfect and really pull together to mend the story and progress it very well. The real stand out is Tom Hardy though, who continuously keeps turning in really well, thoughtful and master class performances, The Drop is no exception. Gandolfini also gives a fitting final performance here and knocks it out of the park. Watching him on the screen is rather haunting in a bittersweet way. Roskam seems to rely heavily on letting his actors work without every manipulating a scene with high tech camera work or any camera movement at all. This is a straight forward film filled with actual characters that feel alive and feel vulnerable and at any moment their life could end in this world that Roskam creates. This isn't the hipster Brooklyn that Brooklyn has seemingly become lately, this is Roskam's Brooklyn and its a cold land without any glorification. The screenplay by Dennis Lehane is top notch, establishing plot points by sprinkling them across the entire film before finally concluding in a twisted but necessarily dark ending that ties everything together. While this does work for the most part, it does feel a bit muddled in second act as if the story is in some sort of limbo, but it quickly gets back on track in no time. The film does have its lighter moments within dialog and scenes with Rocco the pitbull puppy, but for the most part this a really dark film with an equally gritty scenery. Overall, The Drop is a tense and gritty crime film with an amazing cast that doesn't miss a beat. I highly recommend it.

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Amazing performances. Amazing movie.

10/10
Author: pieterdesmet66 from Utrecht, The Netherlands
17 September 2014

If you're into crime movies and dialogue-based movies with a firm stir of action, go watch this. But don't forget: what you see is what you get. If you don't like the atmosphere of the trailer, you won't like the movie. If you do, don't hesitate. Loved Bullhead of Roskam as well, but it's a total different genre of movie, although it'a also an intense crime-picture. I think this is a film that concentrates a lot of fresh Hollywood-talent, with a great amount of quality. We should definitely keep an eye on Hardy, Schoenaerts, Naomie. And of course, if you like Gandolfini/The Sopranos, you shouldn't even be reading this because it was his last movie and he's great in it!

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4 out of 7 people found the following review useful:

The Drop: Low-Key Intensity and the Potential of Danger

8/10
Author: PostingandToasting from United States
14 September 2014

There are a lot of films that fall into the same sort of "ilk" in the sense that when we watch a particular movie, it gives us the same feel as others we have seen before it. This can be a reason why someone really enjoys it or gives the pretentious "it wasn't very original" remark that makes you never watch a movie with that fool again. "The Drop" brings out similar feelings, primarily because it has the feel of many other works of the author (and writer of the script) Dennis Lehane who is famous for works such as "Mystic River", "Shutter Island", and "Gone Baby Gone". Right away you get a feel for those previous works as we are again introduced to a gritty, seedy, and corrupt underbelly of a big city environment that introduces us to a bunch of low lifes who are caught up in doing the wrong things just to "make something of themselves".

What makes "The Drop" different from some of these other films is that these are different characters compared to what we're used to. No one seems to be a big talker and we can tell that all of these characters are more than meets the eye and carry significant baggage from a checkered past. Most films that deal organized crime and other things ask us to witness the violence that just seems to "come with the territory" so to speak with it. This film asks us instead to imagine the potential for violence in a man and how brief releases of that violence can affect how these characters live their lives in the future. There are moments of violence and bloodshed, but they come in such short and intense instances that they hit you harder then violence might normally would in another film of this sort. You believe that any of these characters is capable of beating another ones head in and when something of that sort actually happens, it sticks with you and has a lasting effect that carries throughout the remainder of the film.

The story follows Bob Saginowski (Tom Hardy) and his Cousin Marv (the last film of the late James Gandolfini) who run what's known as a drop bar which simply mean that they serve as a place where mobsters leave large amounts of illegal money to pick up at a later date. Cousin Marv used to be a man of his own power in the organized crime world and briefly had his own crew before he was pushed aside by an incoming Chechen gang and now he just manages the bar with Bob. 10 years has passed sense this change but Marv is still as bitter as ever about his position in life. Gandolfini excels in roles like this for so many reasons. Of course we see a little Tony Soprano in Cousin Marv but he brings so much else to this role from his tone of voice, expression with his eyes, and physical presence that makes the performance that much more captivating. It's great to watch him be able to display that intimidation factor as the "tough guy" that Marv wants to be seen as, as well as the fear and weakness that really exists in his heart.....all being shown through his eyes. It's the kind of performance that has a low-key profoundness that makes you hope the academy rewards a posthumous Oscar nomination.

Hardy is no less brilliant here as the quiet and mysterious Bob. Bob is not a big talker and just lives quietly in his own little bubble tending bar and handling the drop. His life is changed when he finds a wounded puppy in the trash can outside of the damaged Nadiya's (Noomi Rapace) house. They both decide to take care of the dog together as a potential budding romance threatens to grow. Bob has almost an instant connection with the dog, a young pitbull, and you begin to notice similarities between the two as the film progresses. Bob makes a comment that a pitbull is a "dangerous dog" which is true, but almost seems impossible to think when you see them as puppies. Bob can be looked at the same way as the puppy in the sense of he seems harmless but there is the potential for danger and violence deep inside both of them. I've always found it amazing how well British actors can master American accents compared to the other way around. Hardy especially is a master of accents and the way he handles his blue collar, Brooklyn speak is amazing to watch as we follow the mysterious Bob throughout the film, always wondering what he is thinking and what he really is about.

The other stand out performance in the film comes from Matthias Shoenaerts as the loose cannon, Eric Deeds. Shoenaerts brings a level of intensity that is so palpable that you often become uneasy when he is on screen. He spends the majority of the film claiming that Bob's new dog is his and that he wants him back, as we all are questioning what he is really after. Shoenaerts is a rising star for sure and I can't wait to see him continue to show what he's capable of a bigger stage.

In the end, "The Drop" is most likely going to be one of those early fall gems that falls by the wayside after a few weeks in theaters and is unfortunately forgotten about due to poor marketing. However, it also could be one of those small festival films that develops a cult following after people realize how good it is for being a slightly slower paced thriller that delivers great performances and a good story. In a way, that almost fits perfectly into the makeup of these characters who live in this world. Great and powerful things in small and low-key packages

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1 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

Tom Hardy Shines and James Gandolfini Leaves Us With a Memorable Performance.

9/10
Author: PopCulturedwithMovieMike from United States
16 September 2014

"I just tend the bar," Bob Saginowski innocently states in this under- the-radar gem of a film. Tom Hardy plays Bob, a quiet, reserved bartender at his cousin Marv's bar. Cousin Marv is played by James Gandolfini in his final role. The Drop is getting a lot of attention because of Gandolfini, who gives another memorable performance, but The Drop is much more than an opportunity to see one our generation's greatest actors one last time, it's one of the best films of the year.

In The Drop, Marv owns a local neighborhood bar that also happens to be a "drop bar", which means the bar essentially collects money from illegal betting and god knows what else and then delivers it to the local Chechen gang. Gandolfini plays Marv as a Tony Soprano that never was. A guy that tried to get into the game, but couldn't really cut it when the big guys came into town. Those "big guys" are the Chechen mob that have taken over Marv's bar. It's his bar in name only and he's relegated to serving drinks and cleaning up spills. Gandolfini plays Marv as a bitter, beaten down man. It's vintage Gandolfini and a perfect way to end a career that was cut way too short.

As one actor takes his final bow, it's another actor who officially arrives. The Drop is clearly Tom Hardy's film. Granted, Hardy certainly hasn't come out of no where. He burst on the mainstream scene with Inception and should have become a household name after his performance as Bane in The Dark Knight Rises. He didn't, and I'm not really sure why. He seemingly has everything you'd want in a leading man.

Hardy's performance in The Drop should finally change that. I know it's early, but it's Oscar worthy. Hardy plays Bob with such an authentic nature that it's downright astounding. He really inhabits this character. Bob seems to take everything in stride, nothing seems to bother him. When he is confronted by the Chechen mobsters, he keeps his head down and chooses every word with precision, knowing that his life depends on it. Bob is non-threatening and unassuming and almost comes off as simple-minded, but as the film progresses, it's clear something is brewing beneath the surface. Bob is an example of a guy who is a product of his environment. He's a good man that doesn't really have a choice in life. He either adapts to survive or dies.

Bob also has a big heart as is evidenced when he rescues a puppy that has been beaten and literally thrown in the trash. This is where he meets Nadia, played by Noomi Rapace (Prometheus). Nadia is also reserved and seems wounded in some way. It makes sense that The Drop is written by Dennis Lahane (writer of Mystic River, Gone Baby Gone and Shutter Island) who adapted the film from his short story "Animal Rescue," a title with more than one meaning. Not only does Bob rescue an injured dog, but both he and Nadia seem like animals that need rescuing in one way or another.

The Drop is the kind of film that Hollywood just doesn't make anymore. It really does feel like it was ripped right out of the 80's. It has a slow, deliberate pace that perfectly builds suspense. The Drop is a character driven film that constructs each scene with great dialogue and fantastic acting. The director allows his characters to inhabit the world they live in. It's the wardrobe and the set design that really help bring everything together and add to the authenticity of the film. Everything seems organic and not like it's part of a movie set.

The Drop is a film lovers film. It has everything you could possibly ask for: a top notch cast, great direction, dialogue, set design, cinematography, and an understated score. You name it, and The Drop has it. It's easily one of my favorite films of the year. We need more films like The Drop. Go see it.

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1 out of 3 people found the following review useful:

The best movie I have seen this year so far

9/10
Author: GROGtheNailer from Canada
15 September 2014

This is best movie I have seen this year so far. There I said it. I go see about 30-40 movies per year on average and this is the best one in 2014. Now that that is out of the way, here is why.

The movie is so solid through out, the acting is stellar and it builds tension to a very satisfying ending. This was also written by Dennis Lehane (Mystic River, Gone Baby Gone, Shutter Island) so you know it has to be good right? Right.

It reminds me a little of "A History of Violence" in that it builds the tension very nicely and you know that some where down the line violence is going to happen, but when, how and why?

I am really sad that James Gandolfini is no longer with us, he is such a presence in the film. Tom Hardy is the best actor I can think of in today's era, I just buy into anything he is selling, he simmers here.

After a summer of mindless action flicks, go see something with some meat, great performances and a great screenplay. This is a very good drama, well worth your $12.00.

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1 out of 3 people found the following review useful:

Another Marvelous Showcase For Tom Hardy (and James Gandolfini's Satisfying Last Role)

8/10
Author: FilmMuscle from United States
14 September 2014

Tom Hardy, since he tremendously introduced himself to moviegoers in 2008's Bronson, has been consistently building up one of the most impressive filmographies in recent years. Like Michael Fassbender (another exceptional actor who blew up onto the scene in the past decade), every time he's involved in a project, chances say it will be good. Even if it might not, you can always expect him to bring his A- game, constantly changing accents, tones, and personalities. This man is a chameleon actor if there ever was one. In The Drop—a tense crime drama—he portrays a reserved bartender in Brooklyn—a bar that's a drop spot for dirty debts and gangster meet-ups—timidly keeping to his business and proficiently doing his duty. He works alongside James Gandolfini who also appears to mind his own and strenuously tries to continue pleasing the Chechen mobsters who pick up their cash deposits from the drop every once in a while.

The film is sharply edited where every shot builds further suspense with the complement of a foreboding, eerie score. The cinematography is intricately detailed, expecting the audience to pick up on things as the thrilling plot advances, whether the object of interest is in the background, foreground, or the clear focus in a close-up. The pace of the picture never slugs down since every scene is considerably pivotal and the twists and turns keep coming.

In addition to Hardy's and Gandolfini's unsurprisingly fantastic performances, we have a whole cast from the likes of Noomi Rapace (an emotionally vulnerable single woman), Michael Aranov (a chilling, dubious villain as the head of the Chechen mob who makes the viewers anxious with his every glance and subtle threat), and Matthias Schoenaerts (a mysterious and unstable figure) that all share the energy of each scene they appear in.

With that being said, the expected romance subplot between the two leads calms the compelling nature of the thriller and arguably takes up too much time even though it ties into the major plot line with its relations (in a somewhat contrived manner, mind you). The very end also feels like it was shoehorned in just for the sake of ending on a positive note rather than an ambiguous/cynical one that the previous scene, with its mesmerizing monologue, set up. The alternative would've been a superior and fitting conclusion for the characters and the overall narrative.

On another note, many recent films have failed to deliver on the tension they tryingly promised—films like Gravity and Captain Phillips. Establishing tension is certainly very tricky; one can't drag scenes on for too long, and you can't exhaust your viewers with excessive suspense either. The two heretofore mentioned failed in that regard while The Drop managed incredibly tight editing (efficiently transitioning from scene to scene with a competent beat and continually building apprehension), as well as its eccentric characters that obviously seem emotionally unpredictable. Is this encounter going to blow up into an execution/firefight, or will the rivals peacefully negotiate?

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4 out of 9 people found the following review useful:

A good movie that could have been great.

7/10
Author: Viced from United States
12 September 2014

Michael R. Roskam burst onto the scene a few years back with "Bullhead" which was deservedly nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.

In his first English language, American film, Roskam works with a script by the great author Dennis Lehane to tell the story of Brooklyn bartender Bob, waitress Nadia, has-been Cousin Marv, and the mysterious Eric Deeds.

The plot of "The Drop" has been done before to various degrees, and Lehane's script was surprisingly predictable. Although the material wasn't particularly fresh, the actors and a few strong scenes make it worthwhile.

Hardy, although a bit inconsistent, delivers a quietly great performance. You just want to give the guy a hug. Gandolfini is unsurprisingly fantastic in his final big screen performance. He plays to perfection a middle aged has-been that's ticked off with what his life has become. The direction they took with his character was predictable and left me very disappointed, but I'm happy that his last performance was this good. Noomi Rapace arguably gave the best performance in the film, and probably the best supporting actress I've seen so far this year. She does a great job playing a damaged woman trying to lead a good life, and her scenes with Hardy (and the dog!) are some of the best of the movie. Schoenaerts (who was sensational in Roskam's Bullhead) is good, but not given too much to do with a one-dimensional character. And the dog! Rocco! One of the all-time great dog performances in my opinion.

The movie is also really funny at times (mainly Gandolfini in the first half hour and Hardy with the dog). It drags a bit at times, and like I said above the script could have been a lot better.... but it's still a very good movie that easily could have been a great one with a few changes. I'll still see it again, and I'm sure it will stay in my top 10 of the year.

And as a huge fan of James Gandolfini, I'm sad to say this is the last time we'll ever see him on the big screen. But I'm happy that Roskam did him justice with one last great performance. RIP to one of the all-time greats.

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7 out of 15 people found the following review useful:

The Drop

8/10
Author: hohriver from United States
11 September 2014

I felt compelled to write this review because I was fortunate enough to see this movie at an advance screening, and because I do not think the movie will be around long.

The reason I think it will not be around long is because this movie is for adults. It is character driven with a well written storyline. It does not have anything that would appeal to most movie goers....no car chases, moronic humor, or gratuitous sex. The Drop starts slow, but you have to pay attention to what goes on in the movie, and what the characters both do and say. It picks up speed and intensity, and is well worth your time.

The storyline is a very interesting underworld crime caper, but it is very nuanced, with excellent acting by all the leads. I was only familiar with the late James Gandolfini, and he does not disappoint, and the other actors, although unknown to me were also outstanding.

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4 out of 10 people found the following review useful:

I Like Mike

7/10
Author: David Ferguson (fergusontx@gmail.com) from Dallas, Texas
12 September 2014

Greetings again from the darkness. Much of what I write here contradicts my long maintained stance that a strong story/script is the basis for any movie worth it's proverbial weight. This neighborhood crime drama does not spin a twisty plot. Nor does it flash fascinating and colorful mobsters. Instead, it's the acting that elevates this to the point of neo-noir must see.

This is James Gandolfini's final movie. He passed away while director Michael Roskam (Bullhead) was in editing mode. Gandolfini plays Cousin Marv, a would-be wise-guy who never-really-was and is now bitter and desperate, in a beaten down kind of way. As a farewell, Gandolfini leaves us a final reminder of what a powerful screen presence he was, and what a terrific feel for character and scene he possessed.

The real attraction and the main reason to see the film is the outstanding and mesmerizing performance of Tom Hardy. In many ways, his bartender Bob is the polar opposite of his infamous Bane from The Dark Knight Rises. Quasi-effeminate in his vocal deliverings, and moving with a slow, stilted shuffle, Bob is one of the least imposing guys you would likely look right through. At least that's the first impression. Hardy is so nuanced, we aren't even certain when his character evolves and exposes his true make-up. When he does, it's the highlight of the film.

Noomi Rapace, in yet another intriguing turn, plays local waitress Nadia, who befriends Bob after he rescues an abused puppy. Since the movie is based on Dennis Lehane's short story "Animal Rescue", it's no surprise that the main characters each share a need to be rescued. Nadia's ex-boyfriend is played to full creepy effect by Matthias Schoenaerts (so great in Rust and Bone, 2012). The scenes between Schoenaerts and Hardy show the movie at its tension-filled best.

As with most neighborhood crime dramas, there are many secrets, local legends, and allegiances in doubt. The players are weary and dream of either better times or ending the misery. Mr. Lehane wrote the novels that led to some other fine films: Mystic River, Gone Baby Gone, and Shutter Island. He has a feel for realistic characters, and his material depends on extraordinary acting for fulfillment. This slow boil benefits from some of the best acting we could ask for.

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2 out of 8 people found the following review useful:

Requiem for A Lightweight - Gandolfini's solid in his swan song.

8/10
Author: george.schmidt (gpschmidt67@gmail.com) from fairview, nj
12 September 2014

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

THE DROP (2014) *** Tom Hardy, Noomi Rapace, James Gandolfini, Matthias Schoenaerts, John Ortiz, Elizabeth Rodriguez, Michael Aronov, Ann Dowd. Meat and potatoes crime drama from Dennis Lehane (adapting his short story "Animal Rescue") about a Brooklyn bar that houses a 'drop' for mob money for betting and other crimes run by its former owner Gandolfini (in a solid swan song; his final performance) and his cousin Hardy, the bartender with a murky past who finds himself between family and honor. Rapace is a damaged goods local girl who meets cute with Hardy bonding over a battered pit bull puppy. Fine ensemble including Ortiz as a local police detective investigating several crimes encompassing the pub and Schoenaerts as a spooky thug that gets Hardy simmering a low boil when he's not busy doing a dese/dem/dose accent and echoes of Brando in ON THE WATERFRONT as a dim-bulb whose shrewd persona he wears like a mask. Director Michael R. Roskum channels Sidney Lumet via early Martin Scorsese in his Noo Yawk production of requiems for lightweights.

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