7.5/10
1,563
5 user 85 critic

The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 (2011)

Not Rated | | Documentary, History | 1 April 2011 (Sweden)
Trailer
2:20 | Trailer
Footage shot by a group of Swedish journalists documenting the Black Power Movement in the United States is edited together by a contemporary Swedish filmmaker.

Director:

(as Göran Hugo Olsson)

Writer:

(as Göran Hugo Olsson)
4 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Om våld (2014)
Documentary | Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

The most daring moments in the struggle for liberation from colonial rule.

Director: Göran Olsson
Stars: Lauryn Hill, Kati Outinen, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

This documentary tells the rise and fall of the Black Panther Party, one of the 20th century's most alluring and controversial organizations that captivated the world's attention for nearly 50 years.

Director: Stanley Nelson
Stars: Angela Arnold, Erica Ball, Rhon G. Flatts
Fonko (2016)
Documentary | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

In the Manding language Fonko means "the thing", in Wolof "to take care of each other". The great musical revolution of today takes place in Africa, where urban club music is merging with ... See full summary »

Directors: Lamin Daniel Jadama, Lars Lovén, and 1 more credit »
Stars: Nneka Egbuna, Sister Fa, Neo Muyanga
Documentary | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

Michael Rapaport documents the inner workings and behind the scenes drama that follows this innovative and influential band to this day.

Director: Michael Rapaport
Stars: Q-Tip, Phife Dawg, Ali Shaheed Muhammad
Documentary | History | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

The remarkable story of The Weather Underground, radical activists of the 1970s, and of radical politics at its best and most disastrous.

Directors: Sam Green, Bill Siegel
Stars: Lili Taylor, Pamela Z, Jim Lange
Comedy | Drama | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.2/10 X  

Set ten years after the most peaceful revolution in United States history, a revolution in which a socialist government gains power, this films presents a dystopia in which the issues of ... See full summary »

Director: Lizzie Borden
Stars: Honey, Adele Bertei, Jean Satterfield
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Himself (voice)
...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Himself (voice)
Mable Carmichael ...
Herself (archive footage)
Ingrid Dahlberg ...
Herself (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Himself (voice) (as Ahmir Questlove Thompson)
...
Herself (voice)
...
Himself (voice)
King Gustaf VI Adolf ...
Himself (archive footage) (as Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden)
Coretta Scott King ...
Herself (archive footage)
Arnold Stahl ...
Himself (voice) (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage)
Bertil Askelöf ...
Himself (voice) (archive footage)
Bo Holmström ...
Himself (archive footage)
Edit

Storyline

Footage shot by a group of Swedish journalists documenting the Black Power Movement in the United States is edited together by a contemporary Swedish filmmaker.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A documentary in 9 chapters


Certificate:

Not Rated
Edit

Details

Country:

|

Language:

|

Release Date:

1 April 2011 (Sweden)  »

Also Known As:

Black Power Mixtape  »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

SEK 5,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$17,316, 11 September 2011, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$264,324, 6 November 2011
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Goofs

An interviewee says Medgar Evers was killed in 1968, not 1963 which was actually the case See more »

Quotes

Oerjan Oeberg: The prisoners in Attica revolted and barricaded themselves with 38 guards as hostages. The prisoners produced a list of 30 demands for better living conditions, in exchange for the hostages. The demands were predominantly for more humane treatment: an end to physical abuse, for basic necessities - like toothbrushes and showers every day, for professional training and access to newspapers and books. Also for transport out of the country to a non-Imperialistic nation. The riot lasted for 4 days ...
See more »

Soundtracks

Miles Moods
Written and Performed by Guy Barker
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

evocative and well curated footage
10 November 2011 | by See all my reviews

I saw this in a UK arts centre with a friend from the US who had left High School in 66 or 67 and graduated from college in 70. On her own admission here was another America she has never experienced or known about. What struck me about this is the pacing, the editing allows the protagonists time and space to speak and articulate themselves. There's a section when Angela Davis speaks eloquently and movingly and the camera holds on her for several minutes. This film is essential viewing for any younger people involved in the 'Occupy'or anti globalisation / anti capitalist movements. The issues that the Black Power movement were addressing are still with us. The film has a wonderful soundtrack and music score complementing the footage perfectly. The footage is both evocative and informative, carefully selected. There's shots of everyday street scenes, interviews and dramatic footage of rioting and disturbances. Yes BPMT is short on analysis, but for this viewer the beauty of this film is that I felt an empathy as a fellow human being with these angry, militant people and felt inspired to learn more about the Black Power movement and quietly, calmly, start to listen. I don t feel I have to apologise for being white after watching this or start going all PC simply that I have a better understanding now of where some people were or are coming from. Finally, it's fascinating this film emerges from Sweden. Often held to be a model of 'responsible' capitalism, a proper social democracy where entrepreneur ism and business can live happily alongside social provision and an excellent welfare state. However unlike other European countries such as Britain or France, Sweden never had to address the legacy of a colonial empire and immigration from former colonies. It's very safe for a country, a society where everyone looks the same and speaks the same language to be open, liberal and tolerant. I'm very intrigued as to what the fascination and interest was for the Swedish in the Black Power movement, a question this film doesn't address. Maybe the Black Power activists in this film are being positioned as 'exotic' in the same way that countless documentaries always position Africans as exotic, closer to nature, primitive and so on. Just a thought...


15 of 20 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?
Review this title | See all 5 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Paul Scheer on Why There Are No Bad Movies

Paul Scheer discusses The Disaster Artist and his love of awesomely bad movies. Plus, we dive into the origins of midnight movies and explore how The Room became a cult classic.

Watch now