7.5/10
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The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 (2011)

Not Rated | | Documentary, History | 1 April 2011 (Sweden)
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Footage shot by a group of Swedish journalists documenting the Black Power Movement in the United States is edited together by a contemporary Swedish filmmaker.

Director:

(as Göran Hugo Olsson)

Writer:

(as Göran Hugo Olsson)
4 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Himself (voice)
...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Himself (voice)
Mable Carmichael ...
Herself (archive footage)
Ingrid Dahlberg ...
Herself (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Himself (voice) (as Ahmir Questlove Thompson)
...
Herself (voice)
...
Himself (voice)
King Gustaf VI Adolf ...
Himself (archive footage) (as Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden)
Coretta Scott King ...
Herself (archive footage)
Arnold Stahl ...
Himself (voice) (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage)
Bertil Askelöf ...
Himself (voice) (archive footage)
Bo Holmström ...
Himself (archive footage)
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Storyline

Footage shot by a group of Swedish journalists documenting the Black Power Movement in the United States is edited together by a contemporary Swedish filmmaker.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A documentary in 9 chapters


Certificate:

Not Rated
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

|

Release Date:

1 April 2011 (Sweden)  »

Also Known As:

Black Power Mixtape  »

Box Office

Budget:

SEK 5,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$17,316 (USA) (9 September 2011)

Gross:

$264,324 (USA) (4 November 2011)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
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Did You Know?

Goofs

An interviewee says Medgar Evers was killed in 1968, not 1963 which was actually the case See more »

Quotes

Stokely Carmichael: Now, let us begin with the modern period of - I guess we could start with 1956. For our generation, this was the beginning of the rise of Dr. Martin Luther King. Dr. King decided that in Montgomery, Alabama; black people had to pay the same prices on the buses as did white people, but we had to sit in the back. And we could only sit in the back if every available seat was taken by a white person. If a white person was standing, a black person could not sit. So Dr. King and his associates got ...
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Soundtracks

Don't Stop
Written & performed by Ahmir-Khalib Thompson & Ommas Keith
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User Reviews

 
A documentary that details a near-revolution in the United States.
5 October 2011 | by See all my reviews

A bunch of Swedish lefties became idealistically preoccupied with American Black nationalism in the late '60s, and shot a ton of footage intended for Swedish television. Much of it wasn't used, however, and the filmmakers have only recently finished editing it into a feature. Much of this is powerful. Stokley Carmicheal's presence impressed me most of all. I didn't feel as if anything in the film felt unnecessary, except perhaps a petty feud with TV Guide for criticizing Sweedish television, which I doubt was at the center of consciousness of many African-American activists of the time. The trajectory of the film is depressing. We witness a leftist renaissance in the USA crumble as drugs (which the film forcefully suggests were introduced by the FBI) change the escape route of an oppressed community from activism to addiction.


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