Insidious (2010) Poster

(I) (2010)

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  • Eight-year-old Dalton Lambert (Ty Simpkins) suddenly and inexplicably slips into a coma. When his parents, Renai (Rose Byrne) and Josh (Patrick Wilson) get no answers from the medical profession they turn to spiritualist Elise Rainier (Lin Shaye) who says that Dalton has astral projected too far into other dimensions and that his spirit is now trapped in a place called "the Further". Meanwhile, a demon with "fire on his face" and several ghosts are vying for a chance to possess the empty shell of Dalton's body.

  • Insidious is based on an original screenplay by Australian screenwriter Leigh Whannell. It was followed by Insidious: Chapter 2 (2013) (2013) and Insidious: Chapter 3 (2015) (2015).

  • The malevolent entities are said to have an "insidious agenda". In this context, insidious means that they start out slowly but gradually become more and more sinister. Sneaky and devious are synonyms.

  • Josh finds Dalton and starts to look for a way out of the Further, guided by the sound of Renai's voice. Along the way, he meets up with the old woman and confronts her, telling her to get away from him. As she reaches out to him, Josh awakens from his projection and Dalton from his coma. Later, while Dalton pigs out in the kitchen eating spaghetti, Josh gathers up the old photos of himself, intending to dispose of them. As he hands them to Elise, Elise looks at his hands and sees that they are gnarled and wrinkly, like an old woman's hands. She quickly snaps a picture of Josh with her digital camera, causing Josh to go into a rage and strangle her. Hearing Josh screaming, Renai goes to see what's wrong. She is horrified to find Elise dead. Renai looks into Elise's camera and sees a photo of the old woman possessing Josh's body. In the final scene, Josh is heard saying to Renai, "I'm right here." Renai turns to face him and gasps.

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