Exit Through the Gift Shop
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

14 items from 2016


Cinema Eye Names Top Documentaries and Directors of the Past Decade

21 September 2016 12:54 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Cinema Eye has named 10 filmmakers and 20 films that have been voted as the top achievements in documentary filmmaking during the past 10 years. Founded in 2007 to “recognize and honor exemplary craft and innovation in nonfiction film,” Cinema Eye polled 110 members of the documentary community to determine the winning films and filmmakers just as the organization kicks off its tenth year.

Read More: Behind the Scenes of Cinema Eye’s Secret Field Trip for Nominees

Among the films chosen are Joshua Oppenheimer’s “The Act of Killing,” Laura Poitras’ Oscar-winning “Citizenfour” and Banksy’s “Exit Through the Gift Shop.” Poitras and Oppenheimer were both also named to the list of the top documentary filmmakers, joining Alex Gibney, Werner Herzog and Frederick Wiseman, who recently won an honorary Oscar and will be saluted at the annual Governors Awards on November 12.

“It’s fantastic that he is being recognized by the Academy for a »

- Graham Winfrey

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Van Toffler’s Digital Studio Gunpowder & Sky Acquires John Sloss’s FilmBuff

20 September 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Gunpowder & Sky, the digital studio backed by The Chernin Group’s and At&T’s Otter Media, has acquired distribution company FilmBuff. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. FilmBuff is a nine-year-old distributor founded by veteran sales agent John Sloss behind indie movies like “Senna,” Jared Leto‘s “Artifact” and the Oscar-nominated documentary “Exit Through the Gift Shop.” Lately it has focused more on distribution deals for content creators with digital-first platforms like Mashable, YouTube and Vice. As part of the acquisition, FilmBuff CEO Janet Brown will become the executive vice president of the newly dubbed GunPowder & Sky Distribution. »

- Oriana Schwindt

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Gunpowder & Sky Acquires FilmBuff Indie Film Distributor

20 September 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Gunpowder & Sky, the digital content studio launched by Van Toffler and backed by At&T and Chernin Group, has acquired independent content sales and distribution company FilmBuff.

Financial terms of the deal aren’t being disclosed. New York-based FilmBuff, founded in 2008, has been an early mover in digital distribution and has expanded into digital-first content in recent years. FilmBuff will be rebranded as Gunpowder & Sky Distribution, and will be led by FilmBuff CEO Janet Brown in her new role as executive VP of distribution.

“Now we have development, production, marketing and distribution – it’s a full panoply of services for independent creators,” said G&S chief Toffler, formerly CEO of Viacom Media Networks Music Group and a longtime MTV exec. “Now we have an arm that will let us sell stuff around the world, and not only our own stuff, but also for to the Fullscreens, Vices and Mashables.”

According to Toffler, »

- Todd Spangler

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Gunpowder & Sky Forms Sales And Distribution Arm Following Acquisition Of FilmBuff

20 September 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Tubefilter.com | See recent Tubefilter News news »

Digital studio Gunpowder & Sky, which was co-founded by former Viacom and Endemol executives Van Toffler and Floris Bauer, has acquired FilmBuff, an indie content sales and distribution company. This means that nine-month-old Gunpowder & Sky now comprises in-house development, production, financing, and distribution capacities in its quest to develop subversive short-form and feature-length premium content. Now, the company says, it will be able to distribute and market originals globally across all platforms, and represent third-party producers and creators as well.

FilmBuff, which has offices in Los Angeles and New York, will be rebranded Gunpowder & Sky Distribution as part of the deal, and former CEO Janet Brown has been named Gunpowder & Sky’s Evp of distribution. Founded in 2007, FilmBuff was responsible for distributing the Oscar-nominated Exit Through The Gift Shop as well as Rooster Teeth’s Lazer Team. In addition to bold-faced publishers like Vice, Conde Nast, and Mashable, FilmBuff has also handled branded content from Ge, »

- Geoff Weiss

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Arthouse Audit: ‘The Beatles: Eight Days a Week’ Concert Doc Soars in Hybrid Release

18 September 2016 10:50 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Reaching back over a half century, “The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years” thrived with a contemporary mix of theaters and Hulu home viewing availability to become a major grossing event this weekend. The Ron Howard concert doc led an otherwise bleak set of new openers as audiences wait for top titles from festivals to reach theaters.

Included among the openers are two films from directors of Best Picture winners that got little attention: “Mr. Church” from Bruce Beresford (“Driving Miss Daisy”) and “Finding Altamira” from Hugh Hudson (“Chariots of Fire”). Fortunes take different paths. Ron Howard directed “Eight Days a Week,” while Clint Eastwood and Oliver Stone are nabbing attention with “Sully” at #1 and “Snowden” farther back in the pack, respectively.

Opening

“The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years” (Abramorama) – Metacritic: 72

$615,632 in 88 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $7,243 ; Cumulative: $772,467

Ron Howard is the latest Oscar-winner (see Eastwood, »

- Tom Brueggemann

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Saving Banksy Trailer: A Documentary About Removing Street Art

8 September 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

One of my favorite documentaries is Banksy‘s Exit Through The Gift Shop, which premiered at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival. That film, which was directed (or at very least edited) by Banksy himself, takes a look at the ride of street artist Mr. Brainwash using his story as a cautionary tale for the industry built […]

The post Saving Banksy Trailer: A Documentary About Removing Street Art appeared first on /Film. »

- Peter Sciretta

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The Best Films That Blur the Line Between Fact and Fiction

31 August 2016 11:36 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

There is no other place where fact and fiction become more indistinguishable from one another than at the cinema. What you see isn’t always what you get: a manufactured image might feel genuine, while an image that feels inauthentic might be the real thing. The finest stories can often be found somewhere in the middle. As Pablo Picasso once said, “Art is not truth. Art is a lie that makes us realize truth.”

Kate Plays Christine, the latest film from Actress and Fake It So Real director Robert Greene, caught a great deal of attention at Sundance — we gave it the highest grade at the festival — and is now in limited release. It’s a documentary that follows actress Kate Lyn Sheil (House of Cards) as she prepares for the role of Christine Chubbuck, a real-life news reporter who committed suicide via handgun on live television in 1974, and the »

- Tony Hinds

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Doc Corner: Reality Bites in 'Kate Plays Christine'

23 August 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Glenn here. Each Tuesday bringing you reviews of documentaries from theatres, festivals and on demand.

There is so much to unpack within Robert Greene’s Kate Plays Christine, not least of which is whether the film ought to be considered a documentary in the first place. Greene pushes the concept of documentary as a malleable construct that audiences should question the authenticity of much further than his previous 'non-fiction' work, Actress. This time by altogether abandoning reality, he calls into question everything we see in a documentary. By making the audience ask what is and is not real in Kate Plays Christine, Greene is essentially making us question what is real in any documentary and consider the motivations and mechanics behind them.

Audiences have no doubt asked these questions before in famously are-they-or-aren’t-they works of documentary like Catfish, Exit Through the Gift Shop, and even this year’s Tickled. »

- Glenn Dunks

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'Kate Plays Christine' looks like a mind bender of a documentary

5 August 2016 1:42 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Clip It: Each day, Jon Davis looks at the world of trailers, featurettes and clips and puts it all in perspective. This documentary is a pretty intense foray into the world of performance art. Kate Lyn Sheil, who is well known indie movie actor, sets out to play Christine Chubbuck, a real-life news reporter who killed herself on air in 1974. Dark stuff. Especially because Kate Lyn Sheil is a perfectionist and she's plumbing the depth of her soul to get the character right.  This can't be good for a person's mental health. Right? That's what this documentary seems to really be about: the commitment it takes for someone to fully empathize with the mentally ill and what happens when you take on too much of that water for yourself. It's always exciting to see people really dedicated to their art. And I love brain-tingling documentaries. My favorite is Exit Through the Gift Shop, »

- Jon Davis

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The Banksy Job review – old street art spat makes tedious viewing

19 April 2016 2:58 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The theft and return of the celebrated street artist’s sculpture is treated like a major art heist in a film that riffs on Banksy’s Exit Through the Gift Shop

This film dredges up an unsurprisingly long-forgotten news story and stretches it out mercilessly to 90 minutes. In March 2004, Banksy’s first sculpture – a version of Rodin’s The Thinker with a traffic cone on his head and retitled The Drinker – was taken from the central London plinth where the street artist had left it and “kidnapped”. In December, more than a decade later, it was returned to the same spot, only now the statue was seated on a toilet and retitled The Stinker.

Sophisticated stuff, barely registering on the scale of art heists given that the work was a) totally unguarded and b) pretty much worthless, both financially and artistically. (Even Banksy himself only offered £2 for its return.) Yet »

- Alex Needham

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The Banksy Job review – old street art spat makes tedious viewing

19 April 2016 2:58 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The theft and return of the celebrated street artist’s sculpture is treated like a major art heist in a film that riffs on Banksy’s Exit Through the Gift Shop

This film dredges up an unsurprisingly long-forgotten news story and stretches it out mercilessly to 90 minutes. In March 2004, Banksy’s first sculpture – a version of Rodin’s The Thinker with a traffic cone on his head and retitled The Drinker – was taken from the central London plinth where the street artist had left it and “kidnapped”. In December, more than a decade later, it was returned to the same spot, only now the statue was seated on a toilet and retitled The Stinker.

Sophisticated stuff, barely registering on the scale of art heists given that the work was a) totally unguarded and b) pretty much worthless, both financially and artistically. (Even Banksy himself only offered £2 for its return.) Yet »

- Alex Needham

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Cinetic Media Adds Management Division, Expanding Services for Indie Filmmakers

22 January 2016 5:40 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

John Sloss' New York-based Cinetic Media, longtime sales rep for indie filmmakers, is adding a management division to its expansive portfolio of services, which also include film financing, distribution ("Exit Through the Gift Shop," "Senna"), and corporate consulting. Developing its management capabilities allows Cinetic to leverage its existing relationships with filmmakers by offering, in essence, to take care of their careers full-time—and to generate more income. The company has opened an L.A. office and plans to add to its current management staff of five. At Sundance, where the Sloss and his team throw an annual party at Zoom to cap off the the first weekend of dealmaking, Cinetic is representing Asif Kapadia (“Ali and Nino”), Brian Oakes (“Jim”), and Rebecca Miller (“Maggie’s Plan”), among others.   »

- Anne Thompson and Matt Brennan

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Oscar-Nominated Doc 'The Look of Silence' Leads Cinema Eye Honors

14 January 2016 8:23 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The prizes for Oppenheimer and producer Signe Byrge Sørensen made Cinema Eye history: they are the first filmmakers to win Outstanding Feature or Outstanding production twice, for "The Act of Killing" (2014) and now "The Look of Silence." Sørensen also tied Laura Poitras ("Citizenfour") for the most Cinema Eye wins ever, with four. Read More: "Oscar Nominations 2016 (Full List)" Otherwise, Cinema Eye spread the wealth among numerous highlights from the year in nonfiction filmmaking, including Oscar nominees "Amy"—which took home Best Editing, for "Exit Through the Gift Shop" and "Senna" editor Chris King's record-breaking third win in the category—and "Cartel Land," which shared Best Cinematography with Audience Award-winner "Meru." Laurie Anderson's "Heart of a Dog," Crystal Moselle's "The Wolfpack," and Jafar Panahi's »

- Matt Brennan

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‘The Look of Silence’ Wins Top Documentary Award at Cinema Eye

13 January 2016 7:21 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Look of Silence,” Joshua Oppenheimer’s examination of the Indonesian genocide of the 1960s, has won the top documentary award at the 9th Annual Cinema Eye Honors.

The Look of Silence” also won the directing award for Oppenheimer and the outstanding production honor for Signe Byrge Sørensen. Oppenheimer and Sørensen were honored in 2014 in both categories for the companion documentary “The Act of Killing.”

Chris King won his third Cinema Eye editing award for “Amy,” making him the first person to win three awards in the same category. He won the previous awards for “Exit Through the Gift Shop” and “Senna.”

Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin mountain-climbing film “Meru” won awards for Audience Choice and Cinematography. The latter award was shared with “Cartel Land” cinematographers Matthew Heineman and Matt Porwoll.

Laurie Anderson won the award for original score for “Heart of a Dog.” Stefan Nadelman and Hisko Hulsing took »

- Dave McNary

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

14 items from 2016


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