7.1/10
37,234
167 user 200 critic

Catfish (2010)

PG-13 | | Documentary | 1 October 2010 (USA)
Trailer
2:20 | Trailer

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ON DISC
Young filmmakers document their colleague's budding online friendship with a young woman and her family which leads to an unexpected series of discoveries.
2 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview:
...
Himself (as Yaniv 'Nev' Schulman)
...
Himself (as Ariel 'Rel' Schulman)
...
Angela Wesselman-Pierce ...
Herself (as Angela Wesselman)
Melody C. Roscher ...
Herself
...
Dancer: Morphoses
Craig Hall ...
Dancer: Morphoses
...
Dancer: Morphoses
Drew Jacoby ...
Dancer: Morphoses
Rubi Pronk ...
Dancer: Morphoses
Adrian Danchig-Waring ...
Dancer: Morphoses
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Storyline

In late 2007, filmmakers Ariel Schulman and Henry Joost sensed a story unfolding as they began to film the life of Ariel's brother, Nev. They had no idea that their project would lead to the most exhilarating and unsettling months of their lives. A reality thriller that is a shocking product of our times, Catfish is a riveting story of love, deception and grace within a labyrinth of online intrigue. Written by Universal Pictures

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Don't let anyone tell you what it is.

Genres:

Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some sexual references | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

1 October 2010 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Sum  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$257,285, 19 September 2010, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$3,234,373, 28 November 2010
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Color:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The song "Megan" sends to Nev titled "Truman Sleeps" is actually from the movie "The Truman Show" (1998). See more »

Quotes

Yaniv Schulman: [First lines] If this is your documentary, you're doing a bad job.
Ariel Schulman: Why?
Yaniv Schulman: Because you're catching me when I don't want to talk about things.
Ariel Schulman: How should we do it?
Yaniv Schulman: Set it up, organise a time with me, put together some materials, emails, we'll get the Facebook conversations printed out and we'll really talk about it.
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Crazy Credits

The opening logos are recorded off a computer (specifically a Mac). The Universal logo is shown as someone using Google Earth. The Relativity Media logo is shown as if it was an online video. The Rogue Pictures logo is shown as a desktop icon. See more »

Connections

References Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984) See more »

Soundtracks

Santorini Taverna
Written by Marc Ferrari & Matt Hirt
Performed by Matt Hirt
Published by Red Engine Music & Revision West
Courtesy of MasterSource Music Catalog
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Inspires Awe/Revulsion, Difficult to Review
16 September 2010 | by See all my reviews

The Awe is from the reality uncovered behind the mystery the first half of the film is devoted to investigating. There are a few moments of fantastic surprise.

The Revulsion one will likely discover occurs during the thinking/discussion that occurs after the film, when they realize the amount of manipulation by the filmmakers on both their subjects within the film and the audience. With their endless pasted-on smirks, its hard to discern which of the two they perceive to be the bigger dupes. Unlike films (like the comparably classic MAN BITES DOG) that explore similar themes of manipulation and non-fiction/fiction blurring with intelligence and dignity, these filmmakers have taken a story with a real humane potential and bankrupted their morals to create a sensational tabloid-like experience, more likely to titillate certain members of the Youtube Generation/make a few bucks/create some buzz.

Inevitably, Catfish is a challenge to review because to continue to discuss why the film inspires such varied emotions would be to give too much away. And to encourage one to see the film in order to further the conversation would be to promote the careers of people who have no business meddling in non-fiction (or is it? In this case, who cares?).

If only there was a way to see it for free... I'm sure the Youtube Generation can think of something.


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