Wallander (2008– )
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The Fifth Woman 

Three elderly men, Holger Eriksson, Gosta Runfeldt and Eugen Blomberg, are murdered in seemingly unrelated incidents. The smell of perfume on Runfeldt's suitcase suggests a woman's ... See full summary »

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(as Aísling Walsh)

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, (novel)
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Claire Cox ...
Yvonne
Howard Swinson ...
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Sven Tyren (as John Paul Hurley)
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Stefan Karlsson ...
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Sadie Shimmin ...
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Bo Runfeldt (as Edward Hughes)
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Storyline

Three elderly men, Holger Eriksson, Gosta Runfeldt and Eugen Blomberg, are murdered in seemingly unrelated incidents. The smell of perfume on Runfeldt's suitcase suggests a woman's involvement. None are mourned by their families, who regarded them as bullies and womanizers, which shocks Wallander, whose own father has just died. A dedication in a book by Eriksson to a woman called Krista leads to the members of a former self-help group for abused women, attended by Vanja, Runfeldt's ex-lover. Is one of these women the killer? Written by don @ minifie-1

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17 October 2010 (USA)  »

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Trivia

Phyllis Logan and Dudley Sutton both appear in this episode. They were co-stars in the series 'Lovejoy' starring Ian McShane. See more »

Goofs

In the first scene with Wallander, he stops his car and the sound of a conventional hand brake is heard. The Volvo V70 II does, however, have an electronic parking brake, which does not make such a sound. See more »

Connections

Version of Den 5:e kvinnan (2002) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Poor Wallander--Is There No Peace?
12 November 2015 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

You can draw your own conclusions about the ending. Let's face it. Wallander seems to love too much, even those who are dangerous and psychotic. He values human life on the one hand, but has trouble giving that to those closest to him. In this episode, he deals with he death of his father, a complex artist who thinks his son is wasting his life and embracing unhappiness. The story here is about a series of maligned women and the murders of their oppressors. The murders are strikingly cruel and hard to explain. Wallander believes that there is a connection among the different deaths, and it is finding that connection that is at the root of his investigation. Kenneth Branagh continues to portray the long suffering police detective. He is faced with pain every step of the way. He is dogged in his efforts to discover those who have done terrible things, but realizes that sometimes there is causality in their actions. I believe that he can identify with their suffering because he experiences so much of his own. I read some of the Menkel books and had no idea Wallander was so depressed. I am planning on watching the Swedish version of these stories to see how he is portrayed. I think this particular story is the most interesting and well-rounded of the Branagh canon.


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