Texas Chainsaw 3D
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A Note Regarding Spoilers

The following FAQ entries may contain spoilers. Only the biggest ones (if any) will be covered with spoiler tags. Spoiler tags have been used sparingly in order to make the page more readable.

For detailed information about the amounts and types of (a) sex and nudity, (b) violence and gore, (c) profanity, (d) alcohol, drugs, and smoking, and (e) frightening and intense scenes in this movie, consult the IMDb Parents Guide for this movie. The Parents Guide for Texas Chainsaw 3D can be found here.

No in fact this film is a direct sequel to the original 1974 The Texas Chain Saw Massacre and ignores the events of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986), Leatherface: Texas Chainsaw Massacre III (1990), and The Return of the Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1994). This film also has nothing to do with producer Michael Bay's 2003 version or to the prequel that followed it in 2006.

The 1973 scene has four actors returning from previous installments. John Dugan reprises his role as Grandpa from the first movie. Bill Moseley, who played Chop Top in Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2, plays Drayton Sawyer (popularly known as "The Cook") from the first two movies. Gunnar Hansen, who played Leatherface in the first movie, plays a new relative called Boss Sawyer. Later in the film, Marilyn Burns, who played Sally Hardesty in the first film and in Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation, portrays Verna Sawyer-Carson.

The film takes place several weeks after Verna's death, which was September 29, 2012 (according to her gravestone). Given the group is celebrating Halloween, film takes place most likely in the last week of October. The post-credit scene takes place in November.

How old is Heather?

The script says that she is in her early 20s, but there has been debate over how old she should be given the original film was made in 1974, and a title card at the beginning of the film places the date at August 19, 1973. (While Heather is searching through the police file, 1973 is smudged out except for one part just before she realizes who her mother was, you can clearly see that the date is Aug. 19 1973.) Presumably this was either an oversight by the filmmakers, or an act of reconnecting the series continuity to make the events of the original film take place sometime in the late 1980s, despite the original film's release date. Everything in the film points to the story taking place in 2012, e.g., smart phones, today's gas prices, modern technology, and the date on Verna's tombstone.

Boss Sawyer and Bear Sawyer (David Bell) are two white-bearded men who appear to be in their sixties. Dodie Brown is Loretta Sawyer, the mother of Edith Rose Sawyer, who later becomes Heather Miller (Alexandra Daddario). Verna Sawyer-Carson is Heather's grandmother.

A draft of this film's script had his name being Jebadiah Sawyer. This was changed to Jedediah "Jed" Sawyer. He was called Bubba by his brother Chop Top in Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2. However, Bubba could have just been a nickname. It has been used between brothers. In the comic Jason vs Leatherface, Nubbins calls Drayton "Bubba" because he treats him like a brother.

That is not answered in the film. Earlier in the film, Heather used the code "0819" to get through the gate. She could have called her foster parents and told them the code before meeting Leatherface. However, that would seem like a bit of a stretch since she was mad at them for lying to her and they did not wish for her to go there in the first place. Another possibility is that she gave them the code after Leatherface took her in. Whether or not she intended to have them killed by Leatherface as revenge for their deception is unknown.

It is implied that Leatherface dug her up and put her in the house, possibly to treat it as if it was alive. This is not something unheard of in the series. In Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2, Chop Top uses his twin brother Nubbins' corpse as a puppet and pretends that it is alive. In Leatherface: Texas Chainsaw Massacre III, the Sawyers seat Grandpa's corpse at the dinner table and treat it as if it was alive. At the end of this film, Leatherface buries Verna again after accepting Heather into his home.

Heather decides to live with Leatherface because he defended her and she has realized that everyone who was close to her before had lied to her. The letter from her grandmother helps her realize that she has finally found a family. Verna writes that Leatherface will protect her as long as she takes care of him.

Yes. Heather's adoptive parents, Arlene and Gavin Miller, arrive at her new house, hoping to get a share of what she has inherited. Leatherface opens the door and appears with a chainsaw.

Mark Lanegan - The Beast In Me

Producer Carl Mazzocon asked Moseley to play the character portrayed by Jim Siedow in the first two films. Moseley thought that it was strange that he was asked to play him instead of Chop Top and said in an interview that the rights to the film series, which Lionsgate purchased from Platinum Dunes, may not have included Chop Top. Moseley was good friends with Siedow in the years before he died and wanted to protect his legacy, instead of having some other actor do a job that was not up to par.

Not only since 2007's overly brutal TCM: The Beginning, gruesome acts of violence are one of the series' trademarks. Therefore, it was fitting that the newest entry received the MPAA's infamous NC-17 rating. Since that is not lucrative for a theatrical release, censorship was applied in order to get the "R" rating (for strong, grisly violence and language throughout). Also, past experiences let hardcore fans keep calm because the uncensored version could be expected on the home video releases later on. Unfortunately, the announcement for the DVD and Blu-ray did not contain any information about a longer cut of the movie. Would customers really have to accept the censored "R"-rated version on those releases, as well? After weeks of silence, many of them tended to do so and were completely surprised once again when the news broke that the unrated version does indeed exist and will be available exclusively as video-on-demand on US iTunes. The censorship isn't as exciting as the background facts. The alterations are typical MPAA repertoire, so it's either framecuts or usage of harmless alternate material. Altogether 11 differences can be found between both versions and a detailed comparison with pictures can be found here.

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