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Film News Roundup: San Francisco Film Society Honors Kate Winslet, Kathryn Bigelow, ‘Big Sick’ Writers

Film News Roundup: San Francisco Film Society Honors Kate Winslet, Kathryn Bigelow, ‘Big Sick’ Writers
In today’s film news roundup, Kate Winslet and Kathryn Bigelow are set for a San Francisco honor, Sarah Gadon is receiving an award at AFI Fest, and Freestyle buys “The Banksy Job.”

Awards

The San Francisco Film Society is honoring Kate Winslet, Kathryn Bigelow, and the screenwriting team of Kumail Nanjiani and Emily Gordon at its Dec. 5 awards show.

The 60th anniversary edition of the dinner and awards presentation has been newly positioned to take place in the fall after decades as part of April’s San Francisco International Film Festival. The event will take place at San Francisco’s Palace of Fine Arts Exhibition Center.

Bigelow will receive the Irving M. Levin Award for Film Direction; Winslet will receive the Peter J. Owens Award for Acting; and Gordon and Nanjiani, who teamed on “The Big Sick” screenplay, will receive the Kanbar Award for Storytelling.

“We are thrilled that Awards Night’s move to December has inspired
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Five Things You Didn’t Know about Sarah Gadon

Born on April 4, 1987, Sarah Gadon is a renowned actor who has featured in several top-rated films. She first earned her fame when she made an appearance in the films Cosmopolis and A Dangerous Method. With the experience gained in these appearances, her career continued to grow and she was booked to take up roles in other TV series including Mutant X, Are You Afraid of the Dark, Life with Derek, Oracle, and In a Heartbeat. Sarah has also been doing voice acting and in this role she has lent her voice while featuring in Wayside, Ruby Gloom, and

Five Things You Didn’t Know about Sarah Gadon
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Film News Roundup: Disney Channel’s Mollee Gray to Star in ‘A Night to Regret’

Film News Roundup: Disney Channel’s Mollee Gray to Star in ‘A Night to Regret’
In today’s film news roundup, Disney Channel star Mollee Gray lands the lead in “A Night to Regret,” Sentient Entertainment signs an output deal with Italia Film, and Bleecker Street dates five movies.

Casting

Disney Channel’s Mollee Gray will star in the upcoming film “A Night to Regret,” opposite Marguerite Moreau, Variety has learned exclusively.

Tom Shell is directing from Christine Conradt’s script. Liz Vacovec is producing and Chris Lancey is the executive producer.

Gray will portray a pre-law college student and aspiring filmmaker who makes a careless choice one night that could cost her her life. When she goes missing, her mother and friends band together to do everything in their power to bring her home.

Gray is best known for her role as Giggles in the Disney Channel original movie “Teen Beach Movie” and its sequel, “Teen Beach 2.” She also starred in Lifetime movie “Double Daddy,” and the indie
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Michael Fassbender: After a Year of Flops, Here’s How He Can Recover from ‘The Snowman’

Michael Fassbender: After a Year of Flops, Here’s How He Can Recover from ‘The Snowman’
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors and those who hope to get there. In this edition, we take on Michael Fassbender.

Bottom Line: Fassbender is an asset in any ensemble, from the “X-Men” franchise to “Inglourious Basterds.” Those franchises inflate his bankability in foreign territories, and he’s had two Oscar nominations, but he lacks marquee value. He was the biggest star in well-reviewed $97-million sequel “Alien: Covenant” (Metacritic: 65), which scored just $240 million worldwide, down dramatically from the $430 million earned by its predecessor, “Prometheus.” Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin didn’t even know who Fassbender was when his name came up to play the lead in hot project “Steve Jobs” (Metacritic: 82); and sure enough, even with a full-tilt Oscar push that brought him his first Best Actor nomination, the $30-million movie tanked with just $34 million worldwide. Fassbender tends to be cast as troubled antiheroes (Magneto, Macbeth,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Michael Fassbender: After a Year of Flops, Here’s How He Can Recover from ‘The Snowman’

Michael Fassbender: After a Year of Flops, Here’s How He Can Recover from ‘The Snowman’
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors and those who hope to get there. In this edition, we take on Michael Fassbender.

Bottom Line: Fassbender is an asset in any ensemble, from the “X-Men” franchise to “Inglourious Basterds.” Those franchises inflate his bankability in foreign territories, and he’s had two Oscar nominations, but he lacks marquee value. He was the biggest star in well-reviewed $97-million sequel “Alien: Covenant” (Metacritic: 65), which scored just $240 million worldwide, down dramatically from the $430 million earned by its predecessor, “Prometheus.” Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin didn’t even know who Fassbender was when his name came up to play the lead in hot project “Steve Jobs” (Metacritic: 82); and sure enough, even with a full-tilt Oscar push that brought him his first Best Actor nomination, the $30-million movie tanked with just $34 million worldwide. Fassbender tends to be cast as troubled antiheroes (Magneto, Macbeth,
See full article at Indiewire »

J. Hoberman’s Best Movies of the 21st Century

There have been a lot of lists about the best films of the 21st century. IndieWire has been digging through the last two decades one genre at a time; meanwhile, the New York Times’ top movie critics provided their own takes. J. Hoberman, the longtime Village Voice film critic who now works as a freelancer, decided to join the fray. Here’s his take, also available at his site, and republished here with permission.

People have been asking me, so I thought I might as well join (or crash) the party initiated by the New York Times and put in my two cents regarding the 25 Best Films of the 21st Century (so far). I don’t see “everything” anymore and I haven’t been to Cannes since 2011.

There is some overlap but this is not the same as the proposed 21-film syllabus of 21st Century cinema included in my book “Film After Film.” Those were all in their way pedagogical choices. Begging the question of what “best” means, these are all movies that I really like, that I’m happy to see multiple times, that are strongly of their moment and that I think will stand the test of time.

My single “best” film-object is followed by a list of 11 filmmakers and one academic production company (in order of “best-ness”) responsible for two or more “best films,” these followed by another eight individual movies (again in order) and finally four more tentatively advanced films (these alphabetical). I’m sure I’m forgetting some but that’s the nature of the beast.

Christian Marclay: “The Clock

Lars von Trier: “Dogville” & “Melancholia” (and none of his others)

Hou Hsiao Hsien: “The Assassin” & “Flight of the Red Balloon

Jean-Luc Godard: “In Praise of Love” & “Goodbye to Language”

David Cronenberg: “Spider,” “A History of Violence,” “Eastern Promises,” & “A Dangerous Method

David Lynch: “Mulholland Drive” & “Inland Empire

Ken Jacobs: “Seeking the Monkey King,” “The Guests” (and more)

Cristi Puiu: “The Death of Mr Lazarescu” & “Aurora

Chantal Akerman: “No Home Movie” & “La Captive” (assuming that 2000 is part of the 21st Century)

Paul Thomas Anderson: “The Master” & “There Will Be Blood

Kathryn Bigelow: “The Hurt Locker” & “Zero Dark Thirty

Alfonso Cuarón: “Gravity” & “Children of Men

Sensory Ethnology Lab: “Leviathan,” “Manakamana,” & “People’s Park”

“The Strange Case of Angelica” — Manoel de Oliviera

“Corpus Callosum” — Michael Snow

“West of the Tracks” — Wang Bing

“Carlos” — Olivier Assayas

“Che” — Steven Soderbergh

“Ten” — Abbas Kariostami

“Russian Ark” — Aleksandr Sokurov

“The World” — Jia Zhangke

Citizenfour” — Laura Poitras

Day Night Day Night” — Julia Loktev

“Once Upon a Time in Anatolia” — Nuri Bilge Ceylan

Wall-e” — Andrew Stanton

Related stories'Transformers: The Last Knight' Review: Here's the Most Ridiculous Hollywood Movie of the Year'En El Séptimo Dia' Review: Jim McKay's First Movie in a Decade is the Summer's Surprise Crowdpleaser'All Eyez on Me' Review: Tupac Shakur's Complicated Life Deserves More Than This Sprawling Biopic
See full article at Indiewire »

Rocket Science firms up head of marketing

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: Jonathan Lynch Staunton confirmed for marketing role.

UK sales outfit Rocket Science has confirmed the appointment of former HanWay executive Jonathan Lynch-Staunton as head of marketing.

Lynch-Staunton has been working with the company in recent months on a freelance contract but his move became full-time and permanent late last month.

Based in the London office, Lynch-Staunton will oversee all marketing efforts for Rocket Science, including coordinating release plans with distributors and preparing launches at key markets and festivals.

Thorsten Schumacher, CEO of Rocket Science commented: “This appointment underpins the steady expansion of Rocket Science as we continue to ensure the business is well-positioned to grow amid the rapidly diversifying international market. Jonathan brings unique strategic insight and invaluable experience to our team and will be integral as we continue to grow our company.”

Prior to Rocket Science Jonathan worked at HanWay Films between 2000-2016, where as director of the marketing and publicity departments he worked on titles
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Why Viggo Mortensen’s Surprise Oscar Nomination Is So Fantastic

Why Viggo Mortensen’s Surprise Oscar Nomination Is So Fantastic
Viggo Mortensen has just come in under the radar. But that’s what he tends to do.

One of the biggest surprises in Tuesday’s Oscar-nomination rollout was a Best Actor nomination for the 57-year-old star of Captain Fantastic, an indie movie that, unlike the highly acclaimed Manchester by the Sea, has pretty much remained one since its release in July.

Mortensen is best known for his work as strapping, noble Aragorn in the colossal Lord of the Rings movies but, before and since, he has taken on roles in an unpredictable string of well-directed, carefully chosen movies (Eastern Promises,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Game for Anything: Interview with Assassin's Creed star, Michael Fassbender

  • Cineplex
Game for Anything: Interview with Assassin's Creed star, Michael FassbenderGame for Anything: Interview with Assassin's Creed star, Michael FassbenderBob Strauss - Cineplex Magazine12/21/2016 2:51:00 Pm

Consider the dilemma of the great actors from the British Isles. Stage-trained, versatile and geared toward the classics and the experimental, these days they must commit to some big Hollywood fantasy franchise — Harry Potter, Super-something-or-other — or find their careers forever relegated to a Downton Abbey TV knockoff.

Ireland-raised Michael Fassbender is a case study of such a situation. Highly praised for his challenging work in director Steve McQueen’s Hunger, Shame and 12 Years a Slave, Quentin Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds, David Cronenberg’s A Dangerous Method and the Aaron Sorkin talkathon Steve Jobs, the actor stays in demand by bringing the same passionate, cerebral commitment to the X-Men film franchise and Ridley Scott’s revived Alien encounters.

But a videogame movie? So far,
See full article at Cineplex »

‘Captain Fantastic’ Star Viggo Mortensen Recalls Early Acting Role in CBS Miniseries

‘Captain Fantastic’ Star Viggo Mortensen Recalls Early Acting Role in CBS Miniseries
Viggo Mortensen’s choice of roles demonstrates his broad range, eclectic point of view, and love of complex characters. In David Cronenberg films alone, he has played a hardened Russian gangster in London (2007’s “Eastern Promises”), Sigmund Freud (2011’s “A Dangerous Method”), and a quiet family man thrust into an unusual situation (2005’s “A History of Violence”). But perhaps Mortensen’s most famous role is that of the reluctant king, Aragorn, in “The Lord of the Rings.”

Now, he’s getting the best reviews of his career in “Captain Fantastic,” as a father raising six children off the grid who realizes that holding on too tightly to principles doesn’t always work.

Mortensen got his first mention — his name is misspelled in the credits! — in Variety on April 6, 1984, in a review of the CBS miniseries “George Washington.”

You arrived at acting later than most, as an adult.

I was 22, 23, 24, living in New York,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Michael Fassbender: ‘I was a bit of a worrywart. I’ve tried to work on that’

He does raw and repressed better than anyone, but off-screen the actor is learning how to relax. He talks old friends, forgiveness and on-screen nudity

Michael Fassbender is either one of the world’s most well-adjusted human beings, or the most brilliant liar. “I can lie pretty easily to journalists,” he tells me, and he says he’s good at it. “I have to be.” But as this is the policy a well-adjusted movie star might adopt, talking about it only reinforces the impression of someone unusually at peace with himself.

Fassbender came to fame playing men who are decidedly not at peace with themselves. In 2008, he starred in Steve McQueen’s debut film, Hunger, as the Republican prisoner Bobby Sands on hunger strike. McQueen then cast him as a sex addict in Shame, followed by a sadistic plantation owner in 12 Years A Slave. Fassbender has appeared in Fish Tank and Inglourious Basterds,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

David Cronenberg Joins Cast of Sarah Polley’s ‘Alias Grace’ Series

  • Indiewire
David Cronenberg Joins Cast of Sarah Polley’s ‘Alias Grace’ Series
It was announced earlier this year that writer, director and actress Sarah Polley (“Stories We Tell,” “Take This Waltz”) would be adapting and producing the beloved Margaret Atwood novel “Alias Grace” as a six part mini-series for Netflix, starring Sarah Gadon, Anna Paquin, Paul Gross, and now, David Cronenberg.

Read More: ‘Alias Grace’: Sarah Polley Helming Margaret Atwood Miniseries for Netflix

Alias Grace” is based on the real-life 1843 murders of Thomas Kinnear and his housekeeper Nancy Montgomery in Canada, and the controversial convictions of two household servants, Grace Marks and James McDermott. It is told from the point of view of a fictional narrator, Dr. Simon Jordan, who is researching the case. While McDermott was faced with the death sentence, Grace Marks was sentenced to life in prison, despite her undetermined involvement in the crime. She was absolved of the crime 30 years later.

Read More: David Cronenberg: Why
See full article at Indiewire »

King of hearts by Anne-Katrin Titze

Maïwenn on Louis Garrel: "I chose Louis because I wanted him to bring his poetic side, his offbeat side." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

In Maïwenn's My King (Mon Roi), co-written with Etienne Comar (Haute Cuisine), Vincent Cassel, ever more charming, sinister, and unpredictable, as Georgio, morphs before your eyes on screen. And that says a lot when you remember him as Jean-François Richet's shape-shifting Jacques Mesrine or the wild Otto Gross in David Cronenberg's A Dangerous Method. Standing Tall director Emmanuelle Bercot is Tony, an independent, educated, attractive woman, who falls utterly and completely in love with him.

Louis Garrel: "If I put myself into the skin of Vincent Cassel, as in the skin of John Malkovich …" Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The two have the lighthearted bond of Myrna Loy and William Powell until suspicions cloud the skies as they did for Joan Fontaine when she realizes
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Michael Fassbender: The Next 'James Bond' ?

Oscar-nominated actor Michael Fassbender ("12 Years A Slave"), at 39-years old, has the looks, chops and killer instinct to play the next big screen 'James Bond', now that dog-faced Daniel Craig has officially left the '007' movie franchise:

"To be honest with you", said Fassbender, "I think they should reboot the 'James Bond' series and go back to his origins as a soldier.

"I’ve got a great idea for it actually, so (producer) Barbara Broccoli talk to me..."

The stage-trained actor's feature film debut was the fantasy war epic "300" (2007), playing a 'Spartan' warrior.

Prior to that, he appeared in the HBO TV miniseries "Band of Brothers" (2001) and the Sky One fantasy drama "Hex" (2004–05).

He first came to prominence for his role as 'Ira' activist 'Bobby Sands' in "Hunger" (2008), for which he won a 'British Independent Film Award'.

Subsequent roles include playing a 'Royal Marines' lieutenant in "Inglourious Basterds" (2009)...

...as
See full article at SneakPeek »

New to Streaming: ‘Midnight Special,’ ‘A War,’ ‘The Treasure,’ ‘Le Amiche,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Boy and the Beast (Mamoru Hosoda)

Two worlds collide once young Kyuta (Shôta Sometani) and warrior Kumatetsu (Kôji Yakusho) meet in Mamoru Hosoda‘s The Boy and the Beast. The former was recently orphaned after his mother’s death (she had divorced his father years ago and her family refuses to get in touch with him), currently working his way towards becoming a solitary street
See full article at The Film Stage »

Dp Peter Suschitzky on The Empire Strikes Back, Collaborating with David Cronenberg and the New Wave’s “Boring Light”

British cinematographer Peter Suschitzky is known for his collaborations with David Cronenberg (Cosmopolis, A Dangerous Method, Eastern Promises, A History of Violence, Spider, eXistenZ, Crash, Naked Lunch and Dead Ringers). His eclectic career saw him start working in fantastical “what if” tales on It Happened Here (1966) and Privilege (1967). He worked with Peter Watkins, Albert Finney, Peter Watkins, John Boorman, Ken Russell and Warris Hussein in Britain, before Hollywood came calling. is first trip to Cannes, working on Charlie Bubbles by Albert Finney, was cancelled after the festival was stopped by the May ’68 protests led by Jean Luc-Godard. This year, I met him at the […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Fans Defend Keira Knightley After 'Begin Again' Director's Unprofessional Slam

Update: Director John Carney tweeted an apology note:

From a director who feels like a complete idiot. pic.twitter.com/vfO8m4U2Hl

John Carney (@jayceefactory) June 1, 2016

Original story:

John Carney needs to take his sinking boat and point it home, 'cause fans are not on his side this time. The director of the amazing musical film "Once" just decided to trash Keira Knightley in an interview with the Independent, singling her out as the problem with his last film "Begin Again," co-starring Mark Ruffalo and Adam Levine. He has a new film out called "Sing Street," and while promoting the movie, the Irish director went out of his way to blast the Oscar-nominated actress. So Team Keira came out in force after the interview to blast the director.

Here's part of the interview, which includes the unprompted Keira insults.

How significant was it to make the film in Ireland?
See full article at Moviefone »

Horror Highlights: New Chucky Doll, Wizard World & Crypt TV, Mondo’s Cronenberg Vinyls, Screamfest 2016, Shortwave

Chucky’s back and better than ever… Mezco Toyz presents their newest Chucky doll based on his likeness in the first Child’s Play movie. Also: Wizard World and Crypt TV’s eight-city video showcase, Mondo’s Cronenberg vinyls, the Screamfest 2016 announcement, and over 10 photos from Shortwave.

Photos of Mezco Toyz’s New Chucky Doll: From Mezco Toyz: “Unlike the scarred and battle-damaged look Chucky normally bears (people have tried to destroy him in six films so far), this version represents the cleaner, earlier Chucky. His trademark outfit is un-slashed, his face is not yet mauled.

Just as he did in his films, Chucky has lots to say from his trademark “My name is Chucky” to far more sinister phrases.

The star of the Child’S Play films, Chucky stands fifteen inches tall and features real cloth Good Guys clothing, eleven points of articulation, his trademark orange hair and realistic glass-like eyes.
See full article at DailyDead »

David Cronenberg: Why He’s Considering Retiring From Filmmaking

David Cronenberg: Why He’s Considering Retiring From Filmmaking
David Cronenberg, progenitor of body horror and a favorite of art-house inclined genre fans the world over, may not be at it much longer. That's not entirely by choice, reveals Viggo Mortensen in a Cannes interview with Variety, but rather a sad financial reality: The filmmaker is having more and more difficulty financing his projects. Read More: 'Captain Fantastic' Trailer: Viggo Mortensen Isolates His Family For Love -- Watch Cronenberg directed Mortensen to an Oscar nomination in "Eastern Promises" after first partnering with the actor on "A History of Violence." The two collaborated again for "A Dangerous Method," which also starred Michael Fassbender and Keira Knightley. “I can’t think of another around that long that stays as fresh,” said Mortensen, who's in the South of France with his new film "Captain Fantastic." “It’s ridiculous. Woody Allen makes a movie every year and other directors make whatever they want to.
See full article at Indiewire »
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