7.3/10
217
2 user 3 critic

The Armoire (2009)

After a game of hide-and-seek, 11-year-old Aaron is hypnotized to solve the mystery of his missing friend.

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1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
William Cuddy ...
Aaron
...
Gwen
Penelope Corrin ...
Lea Martell
...
Harry
Dennis James ...
Detective Lee
...
Dr. Mendoza
Lois McDonald ...
Mrs. Day
...
Tony
Rebecca Auerbach ...
Ms. Penner
...
Deputy Smith
Catherine Fitch ...
Heather
Mathew Lyons ...
Rick
...
Lisa McKay
Leigh Cahais ...
Choirgirl
Claudia Chan ...
Choirgirl
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Storyline

Adolescents Aaron and Tony are playing a game of hide and seek in Aaron's house, Tony now the hider and Aaron the seeker. When Aaron can't find Tony, he gives up. Tony has apparently gone missing, which brings the authorities and news media in on the case. Ultimately Aaron is placed under hypnosis to see if he remembers anything significant about that day leading up to the game of hide and seek. As Aaron remembers backward from that game, he reminisces about an earlier incident in the armoire in his bedroom. Written by Huggo

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Genres:

Short | Comedy

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Details

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Release Date:

21 May 2010 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Other reviewers are missing the point
9 June 2010 | by See all my reviews

I saw this at Rooftop Films, and the premise of the second segment of short films was that all the films were about "Imaginary Friends." True, I didn't see much in "The Armoire" that alone suggested the idea that the friend was imaginary, in fact at the end it almost seemed like the friend could be real. The ambiguity of this is what made it fascinating, though.

If you approach this film with the premise that the friend is imaginary, nothing at all seems implausible. In fact, as a work of the boy's imagination, it makes complete sense, and is, in fact, quite a beautiful, painful, and rather brilliant work.


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