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Daniel Day-Lewis Struggled With Draping On the Set of Paul Thomas Anderson’s ‘Phantom Thread’

Daniel Day-Lewis Struggled With Draping On the Set of Paul Thomas Anderson’s ‘Phantom Thread’
Daniel Day-Lewis is known to go to extreme lengths when preparing for his roles, staying in character on set and getting inside their mindsets. That seems to be the case for his alleged final performance, in Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread,” in which the soon-to-retire actor plays fictionalized couturier Reynolds Woodcock. According to longtime costume designer Mark Bridges, the mid-fifties period piece found Lewis learning how to drape in preparation for his performance — just not exactly the way he should have.

Read More:‘Phantom Thread’: Enter to Attend Special Screening with Paul Thomas Anderson and Daniel Day-Lewis

The movie, a dark romantic drama that co-stars Lesley Manville as Reynolds’ sister and Vicky Krieps as the dressmaker’s lover, has yet to screen widely. However, Bridges revealed some details about the production process in an interview with IndieWire at the Key West Film Festival, where he received the Golden
See full article at Indiewire »

Sneak Preview Trailer for Paul Thomas Anderson's 'Phantom Thread'

"Reynolds has made my dream come true..." Hold on! The year isn't over yet! There's still a few contenders waiting to premiere. Focus Features has debuted a new "sneak preview" trailer Paul Thomas Anderson's latest film, Phantom Thread, featuring details on sneak preview screenings happening in New York and L.A. Don't forget, PTA ran this kind of preview for The Master a few years ago as well. This is supposedly the final film for acclaimed actor Daniel Day-Lewis, who is retiring from acting (for now). Set in the 1950s in London, the sensual story is about renowned dressmaker named Reynolds Woodcock, as played by Day-Lewis, whose "carefully tailored life" is disrupted by love - as you can watch in this new trailer. The cast includes Lesley Manville, Vicky Krieps, Camilla Rutherford, and Jane Perry. The movie "paints an illuminating portrait both of an artist on a creative journey,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

The Persistence of Vision: Paul Thomas Anderson’s Auterism

By Jacob Oller

Selfishness in direction, but in the best possible way. irector Paul Thomas Anderson is one of the most predominant examples of a modern auteur working today. His films, including Inherent Vice, The Master, There Will Be Blood, and Boogie Nights, are all inextricably his. Figuring out how to put his imagination on screen is the […]

The article The Persistence of Vision: Paul Thomas Anderson’s Auterism appeared first on Film School Rejects.
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Amy Adams Talks ‘Justice League,’ American Cinematheque Award

Amy Adams Talks ‘Justice League,’ American Cinematheque Award
Amy Adams can rise to any challenge: sparkle as a princess, brawl like a Boston barmaid, dance with Muppets, kiss Superman, earn five Oscar nominations and hold her own against Meryl Streep — twice. Still, on Nov. 10, the deeply private, craft-driven actress will face a new test when Tom Hanks, Jake Gyllenhaal, Natalie Portman, Kristen Stewart, Chris Messina and Denis Villeneuve take the stage of the Beverly Hilton Hotel to praise her talents as the 31st recipient of the American Cinematheque Award.

Being lauded for her entire body of work is “a little overwhelming,” says Adams. “I tend to look at things piece by piece.”

As for the prospect of watching a montage of her entire filmography, Adams falls silent. “Yup,” she eventually says with the well-mannered equanimity of an actress who spent years doing dinner theater in Minnesota. Then she giggle-exhales.

“I wasn’t even comfortable at my wedding having my family say things that were nice
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Christopher Nolan Gets Candid on the State of Movies, Rise of TV and Spielberg’s Influence

Christopher Nolan Gets Candid on the State of Movies, Rise of TV and Spielberg’s Influence
There have been extensive doom-and-gloom scenarios about the demise of movies lately, but writer-director Christopher Nolan isn’t among those sounding the death knell. Last summer, as the box office and attendance careened toward their lowest levels in decades, Nolan put his artistry where his optimism was — delivering a jolt of pure cinema with “Dunkirk.”

The picture thrusts viewers into one of the turning points of World War II, recounting a moment when British forces faced total annihilation at the hands of the Nazis. Shot with Imax cameras and presented in 70mm, it also serves as a potent reminder that some things are best delivered on the widest screens possible. “Dunkirk” not only garnered massive critical acclaim, but audiences around the globe flocked to see the film, which grossed $524 million worldwide.

“At a time when there’s all kinds of storytelling around, movies that gravitate toward things that only movies can do carve out a place for themselves
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Phantom Thread’: Paul Thomas Anderson Refuses to Take Cinematography Credit

  • Indiewire
‘Phantom Thread’: Paul Thomas Anderson Refuses to Take Cinematography Credit
Any new Paul Thomas Anderson film is guaranteed to create excitement, but “Phantom Thread” has generated more buzz than usual for two reasons: The drama marks a reunion between Anderson and Daniel Day-Lewis ten years after “There Will Be Blood” and the movie finds the director serving as his own cinematographer on a feature film for the first time. The latter point has been a topic of discussion ever since the movie began production in February without a cinematographer credit on its creative roster. Sources told IndieWire at the time that Anderson had been toying with the idea of working as his own cinematographer for years, but that’s not exactly how the director sees it.

Read More:Paul Thomas Anderson Breaks His Silence on ‘Phantom Thread’: ‘It’s Not Your Standard Love Story

“That would be disingenuous and just plain wrong to say that I was the director of photography on the film,
See full article at Indiewire »

The 20 Best Director-Cinematographer Collaborations Working Today

  • Indiewire
The 20 Best Director-Cinematographer Collaborations Working Today
The gravitational pull that exists between great directors and great cinematographers is natural. Many of the best pairings throughout film history have been project based, with the director or producer picking a cinematographer to achieve a specific look for a particular film. There’s a difference between providing a talented cinematographer with the perfect platform to apply their skills and a director-cinematographer collaboration that elevates the work of both artists, regardless of material.

This list is less about identifying the best looking films of the era – although many are here – and more about celebrating collaborations that have allowed many of the best filmmakers working today to fully express themselves on the big screen.

Dir: Paul Thomas Anderson, Dp: Robert Elswit

The first time Paul Thomas Anderson did not work with Elswitt – “The Master,” shot by Mihai Mălaimare Jr. – the results were (thankfully) great, but it’s fascinating that the director
See full article at Indiewire »

Annapurna Moves Toward Bond 25 With New MGM Distribution Deal

Annapurna Moves Toward Bond 25 With New MGM Distribution Deal
When Annapurna Pictures moved into distribution, Hollywood viewed the move as bold but bizarre. In a market where indies struggle to survive, it was a strange time to reinvent a dying economic model. Now after several costly, high-profile failures, Annapurna and MGM will work together to distribute their films theatrically in the U.S.

Annapurna hired veteran talent — from ex-Weinstein distribution president Erik Lomis and studio marketing exec Marc Weinstock to Focus Features’ publicity chief Adrienne Bowles — but they inexplicably chose “Detroit” as its first release. From director Kathryn Bigelow and writer Mark Boal, the Oscar-winning team behind “The Hurt Locker” and Annapurna’s “Zero Dark Thirty,” this intense recreation of the 1967 race riot in Detroit is a tough sit and demanded special handling from the neophyte distributor.

The movie (Metascore: 78) opened well in 20 theaters in late July, but collapsed when it went wide to 2,800 screens the following weekend. (It topped out at $16.8 million domestic.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Annapurna Moves Toward Bond 25 With New MGM Distribution Deal

  • Indiewire
Annapurna Moves Toward Bond 25 With New MGM Distribution Deal
When Annapurna Pictures moved into distribution, Hollywood viewed the move as bold but bizarre. In a market where indies struggle to survive, it was a strange time to reinvent a dying economic model. Now after several costly, high-profile failures, Annapurna and MGM will work together to distribute their films theatrically in the U.S.

Annapurna hired veteran talent — from ex-Weinstein distribution president Erik Lomis and studio marketing exec Marc Weinstock to Focus Features’ publicity chief Adrienne Bowles — but they inexplicably chose “Detroit” as its first release. From director Kathryn Bigelow and writer Mark Boal, the Oscar-winning team behind “The Hurt Locker” and Annapurna’s “Zero Dark Thirty,” this intense recreation of the 1967 race riot in Detroit is a tough sit and demanded special handling from the neophyte distributor.

The movie (Metascore: 78) opened well in 20 theaters in late July, but collapsed when it went wide to 2,800 screens the following weekend. (It topped out at $16.8 million domestic.
See full article at Indiewire »

Hans Zimmer Got ‘Starstuck’ Meeting Jonny Greenwood, Names Him His ‘Favorite Film Composer’

  • Indiewire
Hans Zimmer Got ‘Starstuck’ Meeting Jonny Greenwood, Names Him His ‘Favorite Film Composer’
Hans Zimmer is one of the most prolific film composers in movie history. An Oscar winner with 10 nominations to his name, Zimmer has worked with everyone from Christopher Nolan to Ridley Scott, Terrence Malick, Steve McQueen, Mike Nichols, and Ron Howard, among many others. He’s such a legend that to be named his favorite film composer would be a huge honor, and such is the case with Jonny Greenwood.

Read More:‘ocean (bloom)’ First Listen: Radiohead and Hans Zimmer’s First Collaboration is An Orchestral Explosion

Speaking to CBC Radio, Zimmer called Greenwood his “favorite film composer” and even admitted to being “starstruck” when he met Greenwood for the first time this year. Zimmer joined forces with Radiohead for a track off the “Blue Planet II” soundtrack, and it was a task that made Zimmer more nervous than usual. “[I didn’t want to] mess up their song, because they’re not just anybody,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Phantom Thread’ Original Score First Look: Jonny Greenwood is Back For More Paul Thomas Anderson

  • Indiewire
‘Phantom Thread’ Original Score First Look: Jonny Greenwood is Back For More Paul Thomas Anderson
Jonny Greenwood’s three collaborations with Paul Thomas Anderson have made him one of the most well-respected film composers in the business, especially since two of the three are widely considered to be modern classics (“There Will Be Blood” and “The Master”). Somehow, the Radiohead lead guitarist is still waiting on that first Oscar nomination for Best Original Score, but things could change this awards season as he gears up for his fourth collaboration with Anderson on “Phantom Thread.”

Read More: ‘Phantom Thread’: Everything You Need to Know About Daniel Day-Lewis’ Final Movie

Anderson’s latest reunites him with his “There Will Be Blood” Oscar winner Daniel Day-Lewis in what will be his reported final role before retirement. The actor plays a famous London fashion designer named Reynolds Woodcock, whose highly controlled life is disrupted by the arrival of a young woman (Vickey Krieps) who becomes his romantic obsession.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Phantom Thread’: Everything You Need to Know About Daniel Day-Lewis’ Final Movie

  • Indiewire
‘Phantom Thread’: Everything You Need to Know About Daniel Day-Lewis’ Final Movie
The Oscar race isn’t over until the last movie screens, and this year one of the final contenders to be unveiled will be “Phantom Thread.” The drama marks the hugely anticipated reunion between Paul Thomas Anderson and Daniel Day-Lewis, who last worked together a decade ago on “There Will Be Blood.” The Upton Sinclair-inspired drama earned eight Oscar nominations, including Best Picture and Best Director, and gave Day-Lewis his second trophy for Best Actor (he’d make history and win a third for “Lincoln” five years later), so anyone would be foolish to underestimate just how big “Phantom Thread” will be this awards season.

Focus Features has been keeping a majority of the details surrounding the movie under lock and key, although the official trailer was finally released on October 23, teasing a gorgeously shot drama about the romantic obsessions of a self-destructive artist. “Phantom Thread” seems to operating
See full article at Indiewire »

Phantom Thread Trailer: Paul Thomas Anderson, Daniel Day-Lewis, and Fine 1950s Clothing

Paul Thomas Anderson makes mesmerizing movies. I didn't see Hard Eight for years, unfortunately, but Boogie Nights entranced me through multiple viewings. I couldn't stop watching it - every time it appeared uncut on cable I was drawn back to it. And the same for Magnolia -- even though I pretty much hated it! Seeing Punch-Drunk Love on opening day in a packed Los Angeles theater left me speechless, and then absorbing There Will Be Blood at Fantastic Fest from a seat that was far too close to the screen near popped every blood vein in my head. (A later outdoor viewing on one of its West Texas filming locations was just as memorable.) Watching The Master, first on 35mm, and then on 70mm with...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Phantom Thread trailer: Daniel Day-Lewis' final film

Joseph Baxter Oct 24, 2017

Daniel Day-Lewis is an eccentric fashion designer for the elite in the Phantom Thread trailer...

Daniel Day-Lewis has justifiably acquired a reputation as the most eccentrically chameleonic actors out there. However, this past summer, the 60-year-old actor and three-time Best Lead Actor Oscar winner announced his most shocking role to date: retiree. Consequently, the upcoming historical drama, Phantom Thread will purportedly stand as Day-Lewis’s final film role.

If the pledge holds, he’s going out with a bang, reunited with director Paul Thomas Anderson for an introspective character study.

The Phantom Thread trailer showcases what (for now,) stands as Daniel Day-Lewis’s last onscreen role before he takes a proverbial curtain call from the movie industry. Here, he delves into 1950s London, playing Reynolds Woodcock, a fashion designer and dressmaker for Britain’s high society types, be it royalty, celebrities, heiresses and the generally wealthy. While
See full article at Den of Geek »

Phantom Thread: watch the trailer for Daniel Day-Lewis's final film before retirement

Set in the fashion world of post-war London, the drama sees the acclaimed actor collaborate with director Paul Thomas Anderson for the first time since There Will Be Blood

The first trailer for Phantom Thread, Daniel Day-Lewis’s final film before retirement, has been unveiled.

Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, the film stars the acclaimed actor as Reynolds Woodcock, a renowned dressmaker who enters into a complex relationship with a strong-willed woman (Vicky Krieps) in 1950s post-war London. It’s the second collaboration between Day-Lewis and Anderson, following 2008’s oil-boom drama There Will Be Blood. As with that film, the music for Phantom Thread has been composed by Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood, who also provided the score for Anderson’s films The Master and Inherent Vice.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

2018 Oscar predictions: Annapurna Pictures looms with ‘Detroit,’ ‘Downsizing,’ ‘Phantom Thread’

  • Gold Derby
2018 Oscar predictions: Annapurna Pictures looms with ‘Detroit,’ ‘Downsizing,’ ‘Phantom Thread’
In just five years, Megan Ellison‘s Annapurna Pictures has established itself as a producer of quality films. Among its Oscar contenders to date: 2012 – “The Master” and “Zero Dark Thirty”; 2013 – “American Hustle” and “Her”; 2014- “Foxcatcher”; 2015 – “Joy”; and 2016 – “20th Century Woman.” This year, it is both producing and […]
See full article at Gold Derby »

Harvey Weinstein Praises Darren Aronofsky’s ‘mother!’

  • The Playlist
Movie producer and studio honcho Harvey Weinstein is also a part-time columnist at Deadline, where he has space to share his musings. And like every other cinephile, who seem to be the only people who bought a ticket for “mother!,” he has an opinion on Darren Aronofsky‘s divisive horror movie. But unlike everybody else, Weinstein starts of his piece by reminding you that he distributed Paul Thomas Anderson‘s “The Master.” In fairness, he brings it up because he claims that just like “mother!,” it was a genius picture that also received an F-grade CinemaScore, but actually, that’s not true.

Continue reading Harvey Weinstein Praises Darren Aronofsky’s ‘mother!’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Harvey Weinstein On Why Polarizing Darren Aronofsky Pic ‘Mother!’ Is A Masterpiece

  • Deadline
Harvey Weinstein On Why Polarizing Darren Aronofsky Pic ‘Mother!’ Is A Masterpiece
Editor's Note: Harvey Weinstein is an occasional contributor to Deadline when he has something on his mind. One of my favorite films that I ever distributed is Paul Thomas Anderson’s The Master. Believe me, it’ll live in history long after most celluloid fades. When you watch it and then watch something like John Huston’s documentary Let There Be Light, the subtext of The Master is understanding an entire generation’s need — especially World War II veterans — to find some…
See full article at Deadline »

‘It’ Lives Again, ‘mother!’ Dies at Box Office

  • Indiewire
‘It’ Lives Again, ‘mother!’ Dies at Box Office
Stephen King’s mighty “It” is single-handedly reviving box office totals after a bleak late summer. It is rare for the second weekend of a hit film to provide the majority of the gross for the time period, but that’s what Warner Bros. achieved on the horror flick’s second weekend. While not as dominant as it was in its September record initial three days, $60 million represented barely more than a 50 per cent drop. Not bad.

With almost $219 million in the till so far and a strong hold, forget $300 million as an ultimate domestic total — $350 million now looks possible. “It” is already the third-biggest modern-day September release ever after only ten days. It will soar past “Rush Hour” by next weekend, and end up almost certain behind “Crocodile Dundee” (adjusted to current ticket prices, at about $410 million) as best for the month in the era of wide initial releases.
See full article at Indiewire »

10 Actors Who Were Almost in Doctor Strange

  • MovieWeb
10 Actors Who Were Almost in Doctor Strange
It was a beautiful validation for comic book fans everywhere when the Marvel Cinematic Universe grew so unstoppable that some of the trippiest and hardest-to-adapt characters were finally able to star in their own franchises, with A-list actors to boot. None have been weirder than Doctor Strange. And now, It's hard to imagine anyone other than Benedict Cumberbatch in the role of the Sorcerer Supreme, who Steve Ditko and Stan Lee introduced in the pages of Strange Tales back in the summer of 1963. But things could have turned out a lot different.

As things got cooking for Marvel's Phase 3, there were a slew of big name actors in contention for the magical role of Doctor Stephen Strange. And a few A listers came very close to signing that contract. As Marvel puts it, Benedict Cumberbatch was always the first choice. But we're not so sure about that, as one particular
See full article at MovieWeb »
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