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Film Review: ‘Phantom Thread’ is Both Beautiful and Muddled

Chicago – There is a certain beauty in human creation, and the fashion industry allows that we can be individual in the sense of our clothing choices. The perfection that those creators attend to is nicely defined in “Phantom Thread,” but as an exploration of their personal life, it is frustrating.

Rating: 3.0/5.0

This is the unique auteur mind of Paul Thomas Anderson (“The Master,” “Inherent Vice”) and the way he approaches his film topics is mind altering. It’s always fascinating to try and interpret his often anti-hero films, and they always fall into one category… The Films of Paul Thomas Anderson. “Phantom Thread” is an obsessive movie, about the machinations of a fictional designer of fashion (portrayed by Daniel Day-Lewis, in what he is saying is his final on-screen role) in post-war 1950s London. The centerpiece of his adventure is about a relationship with a woman who he cannot live without,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

The ‘Phantom Thread’ Score is Now Streaming, Watch a Few New Clips

The ‘Phantom Thread’ Score is Now Streaming, Watch a Few New Clips
Only a few people have been able to see Phantom Thread in theaters since its limited release in December, but the Paul Thomas Anderson movie remains as tantalizing as ever. The release of its gorgeous, stirring soundtrack certainly helps. The score by Jonny Greenwood, who has collaborated with Anderson three times before on There Will Be Blood, The Master, and […]

The post The ‘Phantom Thread’ Score is Now Streaming, Watch a Few New Clips appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Barry Jenkins Adores ‘Phantom Thread’: It Feels Like the Evolution of My Favorite Paul Thomas Anderson Movies

Barry Jenkins Adores ‘Phantom Thread’: It Feels Like the Evolution of My Favorite Paul Thomas Anderson Movies
Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread” has quickly become a favorite among some of our favorite directors, including Edgar Wright, Rian Johnson, and now Barry Jenkins. The “Moonlight” Oscar winner finally caught up with the romantic drama in the new year and had nothing but raves to share with his social media followers.

Read More:Paul Thomas Anderson’s Beautiful Struggle: Trump, Retirement, and Death Made ‘Phantom Thread’ One of His Hardest Films

“‘Phantom Thread’ is just exquisite, an unfiltered work; a sublime object,” Jenkins wrote about the film. “Object in the sense that, when viewed from different angles, in varying moods, it reveals more and more of itself, other emotions and, for a film overrun with aesthetic objects, deepened ideas.”

Jenkins was particularly impressed with the fact Anderson was able to pull off such an achievement while handling so many on-set duties. “Phantom Thread” marked the first time the director worked without a cinematographer.
See full article at Indiewire »

Jonny Greenwood’s Oscar-Worthy ‘Phantom Thread’ Score is Now Streaming in Its Entirety — Listen

Jonny Greenwood’s Oscar-Worthy ‘Phantom Thread’ Score is Now Streaming in Its Entirety — Listen
Sit down and turn up the volume. Jonny Greenwood’s gorgeous and Oscar-worthy original score for Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread” is now streaming in its entirety online and it more than deserves all of our attention.

Read More:Jonny Greenwood’s ‘Phantom Thread’ Original Score is Used in Nearly 70% of the Movie

The score marks the fourth collaboration between Greenwood and Anderson after “There Will Be Blood,” “The Master,” and “Inherent Vice,” and it could very well be Greenwood’s best film score yet. The musician has never earned an Oscar nomination. “Phantom Thread” deserves to change that.

IndieWire named Greenwood’s “Phantom Thread” score the best of 2017. “If Greenwood’s contributions to ‘Phantom Thread’ are the most beautiful (and self-sustaining) music that he’s ever written for the screen,” wrote David Ehrlich, “it’s only because his compositions are even more inextricable from this movie than they were from his last three scores.
See full article at Indiewire »

Timothée Chalamet & Armie Hammer on Sex Scenes in ‘Call Me by Your Name’: Awards Season Spotlight Profile

Timothée Chalamet & Armie Hammer on Sex Scenes in ‘Call Me by Your Name’: Awards Season Spotlight Profile
One the most beautifully directed films of awards season, “Call Me by Your Name” is a vibrant meditation on first love — and its inevitable impermanence. As Elio and Oliver, the film’s electrifying duo, every movement by Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer is precisely chosen and effortlessly natural. The timid lovers dance nervously around each other, both physically and metaphorically, whether it’s to the tune of the Psychedelic Furs or the trickle of an Italian fountain.

Based on the novel by Andre Aciman, “Call Me by Your Name” takes place at an Italian countryside villa in the mid-1980s. Oliver (Hammer), an older American graduate student, falls in love with Elio (Chalamet) while living with the family as a research assistant to Elio’s father. Building gradually, the sexual energy between them comes through with a longing glance, intellectual sparring, or the spaces between their bodies. According to Chalamet,
See full article at Indiewire »

Mondo is Bringing Paul Thomas Anderson’s ‘Magnolia’ Original Score to Vinyl For the First Time

Mondo is Bringing Paul Thomas Anderson’s ‘Magnolia’ Original Score to Vinyl For the First Time
Mondo is celebrating the release of Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread” by bringing the iconic score to his character epic “Magnolia” to vinyl for the first time. The 3-lp set features all of the film’s songs by Aimee Mann and the complete score by Jon Brion. The vinyl goes on sale January 17.

Read More:The 50 Best Mondo Movie Posters

Magnolia” was released in 1999 following the crossover success of “Boogie Nights.” The sprawling saga featured Anderson’s most star-studded ensemble, including Julianne Moore, Tom Cruise, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Philip Baker Hall, William H. Macy, John C. Reilly, and more. Cruise was nominated for the Best Supporting Actor Oscar.

Mondo will release the original songs and score not only on vinyl for the first time, but also for the first time in a single release. The collection features new artwork from Joao Ruas and is pressed on 180 gram colored vinyl. The
See full article at Indiewire »

Robert De Niro Unleashes on Trump at Politically-Charged National Board of Review Gala

The dresses had a little more color, but the National Board of Review’s 2018 Awards gala — honoring Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks, Greta Gerwig, Jordan Peele and “The Post,” among other creators and projects — continued the charged, often political awards-season conversations begun at the Golden Globes on Jan. 7.

Nbr’s annual awards ceremony, the winners of which were previously announced, got off to a speedy, focused start, but it didn’t take long for the events of the last year, from #MeToo to the Trump presidency, to come up.

Robert De Niro proved the most direct in his introduction of Meryl Streep, who was picking up the best actress award for her performance in Stephen Spielberg’s “The Post.” De Niro encouraged applause for an off-hand dismissal of Trump. “Let’s clap for that,” he said. “This f—ing idiot is the president. It’s ‘The Emperor’s New Clothes.’ The guy is a f—ing fool. Come
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Timothée Chalamet on His ‘Hero’ Paul Thomas Anderson and ‘Intensely Honest’ Scene in ‘The Master’ That Changed His Life

Timothée Chalamet on His ‘Hero’ Paul Thomas Anderson and ‘Intensely Honest’ Scene in ‘The Master’ That Changed His Life
It’s the hottest move on the awards season circuit these days: using an acceptance speech to pay homage to your cinematic heroes while also attempting to line up your next big gig. At last week’s New York Film Critics Circle Awards, “Phantom Thread” star Lesley Manville filled in for Paul Thomas Anderson when it came time to accept his Best Screenplay award, reading off a speech that included an appeal to Best Supporting Actress winner Tiffany Haddish to work with him, going so far as to literally provide her (and the entire room) with his phone number in hopes of connecting.

At Tuesday night’s National Board of Review awards event in New York City, the tables were turned, with Breakthrough Performance winner Timothée Chalamet, the revelatory star of “Call Me by Your Name,” using his own acceptance speech to profess his adoration for Anderson, lightly asking for
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: Phantom Thread Exquisitely Unravels Genius

In terms of the last three films crafted by the greatest showman in cinema, P.T. Anderson, in which I include his latest - dare I say - masterpiece, I’m fairly distrusting of reviews conducted after a single screening. And yet, that is exactly what I’m nevertheless delighted to be tasked with achieving today. There aren’t many filmmakers operating on this dense a level - the works of Stanley Kubrick and David Lynch come to mind - but films like The Master and Inherent Vice are the best kind of heady cinematic riddles; wherein each layer is meticulously constructed to offer distinctly nuanced energies. Many will, and have, countered this argument by saying films shouldn’t require three admission tickets in order to catch an idea of...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

‘There Will Be Blood’ and the Poetry of Paul Thomas Anderson’s Elegant Magnum Opus

Looking back on this still-young century makes clear that 2007 was a major time for cinematic happenings — and, on the basis of this retrospective, one we’re not quite through with ten years on. One’s mind might quickly flash to a few big titles that will be represented, but it is the plurality of both festival and theatrical premieres that truly surprises: late works from old masters, debuts from filmmakers who’ve since become some of our most-respected artists, and mid-career turning points that didn’t necessarily announce themselves as such at the time. Join us as an assembled team, many of whom were coming of age that year, takes on their favorites.

Paul Thomas Anderson is, at heart, a poet. While firmly on the side of traditional narrative cinema, his films have always favored aesthetic and textual lyricism over purely prosaic storytelling, even the masterfully precise prose of professed
See full article at The Film Stage »

Paul Thomas Anderson Talks His Career, Comedy, and ‘Phantom Thread’ in 100-Minute Conversation

Paul Thomas Anderson’s exquisite Phantom Thread is now in theaters, which means the second-best thing about a new film from the director comes with it: interviews with Paul Thomas Anderson. One of the greatest–and, as of now, most comprehensive–was his conversation on The Bill Simmons Podcast (from this appearance alone, one can already sense his latest film might have a wider appeal than his last few, as fascinating as they were.)

More of a career-spanning discussion than specifically about his latest film, he talks about his love for classic trailers, but an all-around dislike for the current marketing ploys (“There’s too much yapping about things before they are even done.”) He also dives into Boogie Nights and clashing with Burt Reynolds, which was ultimately fruitful for the final product.

Perhaps the most illuminating section is when he talks about the comedy of his most recent films.
See full article at The Film Stage »

All 8 Paul Thomas Anderson Movie Ranked Worst to Best (Photos)

  • The Wrap
All 8 Paul Thomas Anderson Movie Ranked Worst to Best (Photos)
One of the most acclaimed directors under the age of 50, Paul Thomas Anderson is a master of character-driven dramas. He is known for working with some of the world’s finest actors in films about obsessive men. Some of those men are obsessed with such predictable vices as gambling (“Hard Eight”), porn (“Boogie Nights”) and drugs (“Inherent Vice”). The poison of other obsessive men in Anderson’s films has been more complex — a mind-controlling religious cult (“The Master”), the oil industry (“There Will be Blood”), sexual politics (“Magnolia”) and haute-couture dressmaking (“Phantom Thread”). Anderson’s actors never disappoint, but occasionally his.
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Phantom Thread’ Film Review: Paul Thomas Anderson, Daniel Day-Lewis Strike a Pose

  • The Wrap
‘Phantom Thread’ Film Review: Paul Thomas Anderson, Daniel Day-Lewis Strike a Pose
After mining the American soul (“Boogie Nights,” “There Will Be Blood,” “The Master”) as brilliantly as any working director has in the last 50 years, Paul Thomas Anderson moves to 1950’s England for “Phantom Thread,” his mesmerizing follow-up to the loosey-goosey “Inherent Vice.” An elegantly stitched romance of vector-crossing emotional neediness, it’s set in an evocative ecosphere of haute couture fashion. But by the time it reaches its appetizingly perverse end, the film primarily reaffirms Anderson’s own skill at hand-crafting exquisitely conflicting interior and external worlds. Advance word zeroed in on the movie’s status as three-time Academy Award-winner Daniel Day-Lewis’s swan.
See full article at The Wrap »

Scott Reviews Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread [Theatrical Review]

I’ve maintained what I consider to be a healthy distrust of my past self, which is to say, while I maintain many of the same interests throughout my life, I tend to look skeptically on what specifically obsessed me when I was younger. This is a film review, so I’ll keep my examples there – I still quite like Fight Club, but when I was 18, I thought it the greatest film ever made and dared anyone to prove me wrong. These days, I still like David Fincher, but he seems in some ways ossified to that time in my life, no longer a major artist, but an interesting, dependably esoteric and highly-skilled director. I feel that way of many of my obsessions from that era, those still-working filmmakers who haven’t gotten any worse but rarely seem to become appreciably better. Or perhaps it’s my own restlessness, eager
See full article at CriterionCast »

Why the ‘Phantom Thread’ 70mm Screenings Are a Unique Experiment That Could Look Significantly Different

Why the ‘Phantom Thread’ 70mm Screenings Are a Unique Experiment That Could Look Significantly Different
Starting on Christmas Day in New York and Los Angeles, followed by four other cities on January 12, Paul Thomas Anderson’s new film “Phantom Thread” will have special 70mm screenings in select theaters. It’s a rare treat anytime a print gets projected in 2017, while the special 70mm screenings of films like “Hateful 8” and “Dunkirk” have become must-see cinephile events that showcase the incredible detail that comes from working in larger format celluloid.

Anderson’s “The Master” was a perfect example. Since it was shot on 70mm, seeing the vividness of the image projected in 70mm heightened the power of the hallucinatory imagery as Joaquin Phoenix’s wayward soul falls under the spell of Philip Seymour Hoffman’s guru.

However, “Phantom Thread” is a different kind of movie — and its 70mm release will be instructive — even to Anderson’s lighting and camera crew – in terms of seeing what the film looks like in 70mm.
See full article at Indiewire »

Buffy the Vampire Slayer Rewatch: Surprise

  • TVfanatic
Brace yourselves, Buffy the Vampire Slayer fans. We've got a special Friday edition of the rewatch just for you. (And things are about to become intense from here on out.)

Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 2 Episode 13 was the beginning of the series's change in tone. Sure, there were dramatic and dark hours before "Surprise," but there's something at this moment that changed it all. It helped shaped the progression to become the show we all know and love.

Let's dig deeper and find out why in "Surprise."

I loved watching Buffy's prophetic dreams.

It's such an underrated part to the series. Many forget that it's an ability she has as a Slayer because it was slowly phased out; however, it makes such a difference when used. Some of her adventures were only solved because of the dreams.

The last we do see this ability appear is in Buffy the Vampire Slayer
See full article at TVfanatic »

‘Phantom Thread’ Score First Listen: Jonny Greenwood Really Needs That First Oscar Nomination

‘Phantom Thread’ Score First Listen: Jonny Greenwood Really Needs That First Oscar Nomination
Jonny Greenwood has worked with Paul Thomas Anderson three times before, including “There Will Be Blood,” “The Master,” and “Inherent Vice,” but he may have just saved the best for the fourth time. “Phantom Thread,” Anderson’s latest about the romance between a famous London fashion designer (Daniel-Day Lewis) and a country waitress (Vicky Krieps), finds Greenwood working with his biggest orchestra yet (a 60-string ensemble) and crafting his most lush melodies to date.

Read More:Jonny Greenwood’s ‘Phantom Thread’ Original Score is Used in Nearly 70% of the Movie

“We talked a lot about ‘50s music, what was popularly heard then as well as what was being written and recorded,” Greenwood recently told Variety about the score. “Nelson Riddle and Glenn Gould’s Bach recordings were the main references. I was interested in the kind of jazz records that toyed with incorporating big string sections, Ben Webster made some good ones,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Phantom Thread’: Paul Thomas Anderson Says “Reynolds Woodcock” Was A Joke Name That Stuck

From a distance, it might be easy to look at the films in the latter half of Paul Thomas Anderson‘s career (“Inherent Vice” aside) and believe the filmmaker to be a Very Serious Person. Certainly, pictures like “There Will Be Blood,” “The Master,” and his latest, “Phantom Thread,” come from a filmmaker who cares deeply about his craft.

Continue reading ‘Phantom Thread’: Paul Thomas Anderson Says “Reynolds Woodcock” Was A Joke Name That Stuck at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Oscars 2018: How the ‘Dunkirk’ and ‘Phantom Thread’ Original Scores Dodged Disqualification

In the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ announcement of 141 films qualified for Best Original Score, the biggest news stemmed from an absence: No controversy. “I, Tonya” and “The Greatest Showman” scores were deemed ineligible based on their predominant use of songs, while “Call Me By Your Name” and “Detroit” didn’t even submit, presumedly knowing they wouldn’t qualify. Those omissions merit a shrug, unlike the outrage that followed last year’s disqualification of Johann Johannsson’s “Arrival” and Lesley Barber’s “Manchester By the Sea” scores.

This year, people were closely watching what happened to Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood and legend Hans Zimmer. Each has a history of running afoul of qualification rules, and each has one of the most celebrated scores of 2017, “Phantom Thread” and “Dunkirk.”

In the case of Greenwood, devoted fans still haven’t gotten over the disqualification of his brilliant 35-minute original score
See full article at Indiewire »

The 50 top films of 2017 in the Us: No 4 Phantom Thread

Daniel Day-Lewis makes his swansong in Paul Thomas Anderson’s pitch-black romantic comedy about falling in and out of love

• More on the best Us films of 2017

• More on the best UK films of 2017

• More on the best culture of 2017

We allow a suspension of disbelief when it comes to films in genres that would collapse without it, but there’s less room for fantasy in those about relationships. There’s a reason why the romantic comedy has become something of a dead genre and it’s not entirely Katherine Heigl’s fault. We can’t help but pick holes in any element of a big-screen courtship that doesn’t ring true. We might forgive some of the more swoon-worthy grand gestures of a story, but we need to believe what we see when we’ve all got at least a modicum of real-world experience with romance.

It has become
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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