7.6/10
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73 user 118 critic

Restrepo (2010)

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ON DISC
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 10 wins & 19 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
The Men of Battle Company 2nd of the 503rd Infantry Regiment 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team ...
Themselves
Juan 'Doc Restrepo ...
Himself
Dan Kearney ...
Himself
LaMonta Caldwell ...
Himself
Aron Hijar ...
Himself
Misha Pemble-Belkin ...
Himself
Miguel Cortez ...
Himself
Sterling Jones ...
Himself
Brendan O'Byrne ...
Himself
Joshua McDonough ...
Himself
Kyle Steiner ...
Himself
Angel Toves ...
Himself
Mark Patterson ...
Himself
Stephen Gillespie ...
Himself
Marc Solowski ...
Himself

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Storyline

Sebastian Junger and Tim Hetherington's year dug in with the Second Platoon in one of Afghanistan's most strategically crucial valleys reveals extraordinary insight into the surreal combination of back breaking labor, deadly firefights, and camaraderie as the soldiers painfully push back the Taliban. Written by Sundance Film Festival

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

One platoon, one valley, one year

Genres:

Documentary | War

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language throughout including some descriptions of violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

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Release Date:

6 August 2010 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Restrepo - Inferno in Afghanistan  »

Filming Locations:


Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$35,581 (USA) (25 June 2010)

Gross:

$1,330,894 (USA) (3 December 2010)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The movie's title comes from Private First Class Juan "Doc" Restrepo, whose memory is also honored in the company's isolated base camp, OP Restrepo. See more »

Quotes

Joshua McDonough: They're gathering intel right now, basically, on how to deal with us because they haven't - - there's no real research or intel on how to treat us right now because they haven't had to deal with people like us since WWII and Vietnam, you know, dealing with guys that are coming back from 15 month deployments with as much fighting, you know, as we went through.
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Connections

Referenced in Stones (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Touch Me
Written by Jon Astrop
Performed by Günther & the Sunshine Girls
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User Reviews

Objectivity
19 August 2010 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

"The horror! The horror! " Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness.

CNN describes Afghanistan's Korangal Valley as "the most dangerous place in the world." After seeing the powerful documentary Restrepo, I can understand the description, and I can admire an almost new dimension to that type of film: objectivity.

An American company of soldiers spent 15 months in that valley with filmmakers Tom Hetherington and Sebastian Junger recording the soldiers' combat and more importantly their personal reactions. For indeed Restrepo is about soldiers fighting an enemy they can't see, a boredom they can't leave behind, and friendships they will keep forever, depending on how long forever can be in such a hostile environment.

The singular feature of this Oscar-winning film is its attempt to make no judgment about the appropriateness of the war; it just chronicles the lives of young men stretched by fate to an endurance few of us could even imagine. Not that it's all that bloody or manic; it's just that the terror of an enemy hidden by mountains hangs about like a fog to such an extent that when they do kill one far away in the foothills, they rejoice as if they had wiped out a platoon. When the tired soldiers dance to "Touch Me (I Want Your Body)" by Gunther and Samantha Fox, they celebrate life, not killing.

Back to that objectivity: Even a documentary marries fiction when directors choose some images over others. In Restrepo the choices lead me to question how the US could ever win this war, not because that's the directors' statement but because the successes are limited to building a stronghold, Restrepo (named after a fallen comrade), at the top of a mountain among mountains that dare the most powerful army in history to try to win this one when none has ever been won here. Indeed, the army has subsequently withdrawn.

While the fictional Hurt Locker minimized its bloodshed in favor of the representational, Restrepo takes no liberties but goes for the real, which in this case is like waiting around a movie set for something to happen. And when it does, it can win an Academy Award.


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